Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$7.99
CD$5.99

Classical - Released October 1, 2010 | London Philharmonic Orchestra

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES$3.60$8.99(60%)
CD$2.92$7.29(60%)

Classical - Released June 5, 2012 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
JoAnn Falletta and the Ulster Orchestra present a diverse program of lesser known works by Gustav Holst, the composer of the perennially popular suite The Planets. Holst's music was informed early on by the late Romantics, and traces of Johannes Brahms can be plainly heard in the Walt Whitman Overture, which Holst composed at college when he was still searching for a personal style. The Symphony in F major, "The Cotswolds," was a major step forward in developing a distinctive voice, and though it partakes of conventions in British symphonic writing, it shows a growing awareness of folk music's potential in his work. A Winter Idyll, influenced by Holst's teacher, Charles Villiers Stanford, shows much the same tentative exploration of the Walt Whitman Overture. But there is a pronounced change in flavor and mood in the Japanese Suite and the symphonic poem, Indra, which show Holst's adoption of impressionist harmonies and atmospheric orchestration, as well as a turning away from purely German influences to draw on Asian musical ideas and philosophies. Fans of Holst's music will find the last 25 minutes of the CD will put them on familiar ground, though the first 40 minutes of the album will at least provide context for his career. The orchestra delivers satisfying performances, and Falletta leads with great control and clarity, so all the pieces feel fully realized and exciting to play. © TiVo
HI-RES$4.75$7.99(41%)
CD$3.00$5.99(50%)

Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | LSO Live

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released October 11, 2019 | Reference Recordings

Hi-Res Booklet
Reference Recordings proudly presents Holst’s best known and beloved works in a new interpretation from Michael Stern and the Kansas City Symphony. This release was recorded in the beautiful and acoustically acclaimed Helzberg Hall, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. It was produced by David Frost. The Kansas City Symphony has a vision to transform hearts, minds and its community through the power of symphonic music. Founded in 1982, the Symphony has established itself as a major force in the cultural life of the community. Praised for performances of uncompromising standard, the orchestra is the largest in the region and holds a national reputation under the artistic leadership of Music Director Michael Stern. This is the seventh in Reference Recordings’ series with Kansas City Symphony. © Reference Recordings
HI-RES$10.49
CD$8.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1974 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Classical - Released November 11, 1971 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Symphonic Music - Released October 5, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
Sir Andrew Davis returns to his exploration of Holst’s orchestral works with the brilliant BBC Philharmonic, a series initiated almost ten years ago by the late Richard Hickox, then taken over by another expert in British repertoire. This selection of orchestral works by Holst provides a remarkable overview of his career, ranging from such early works as A Winder Idyll – composed in 1897 when he was still studying at the Royal College of Music – to the Scherzo of a symphony on which he was working towards the end of his life. None of the music recorded here was published in his lifetime, and the Scherzo – rarely heard though it is – is the only work to have entered the repertoire. A Moorside Suite, originally written for brass band, is featured here in the composer's rarely heard arrangement for strings. The young British cellist Guy Johnston is the soloist in Invocation, one of Holst’s most significant works, calling for a subtle balance of virtuosity and expressive qualities. © Chandos
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Symphonic Music - Released February 17, 2012 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Symphonic Music - Released July 28, 2006 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
CD$6.49

Symphonic Music - Released May 24, 2016 | Les Indispensables de Diapason

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
Although best remembered for his devotion to the core Austro-Germanic repertoire, Austrian conductor Herbert von Karajan did flirt with the English repertoire in the '50s and early '60s. There are EMI recordings of him leading the Philharmonia in Vaughan Williams' Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis and Britten's Variations on a Theme by Frank Bridge and rehearsal recordings of him leading the Orchestra Sinfonica della RAI di Roma in Walton's First Symphony. His last affair was this 1961 performance of Holst's The Planets with the Vienna Philharmonic. Recorded in bone-crushing -- but still deep and colorful -- sound by John Culshaw, Karajan's view of The Planets, like his view of Vaughan Williams and Britten, is decidedly superficial. This is not to say that his conducting is anything less than superb. Karajan was one of great technical virtuosos and he misses nothing in Holst's monumental score -- not the balances, not the details, not the colors, not the rhythms, nothing. But everything inside Holst's score is more or less missing: "Mars" has power but lacks point, "Venus" has beauty but lacks soul, "Mercury" has speed but lacks strength, "Jupiter" has weight but lacks humor, "Saturn" has mass but lacks fear, "Uranus" has muscle but lacks wit, and "Neptune" has carefully calculated gradations of dynamics but altogether lacks any sense of blissful departure into infinite space.
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released April 24, 2020 | Delphian

Hi-Res Booklet
Gustav Holst's The Cloud Messenger, Op. 30, of 1913, is all but forgotten. A giant choral-orchestral setting of an epic Sanskrit love poem, the work was, in Holst's mind, to be a major expansion of the music on Indian subjects he had been pursuing since the first years of the century. Unfortunately, the premiere was sunk by a ghastly error (no semi-choir was provided, and the singers attempted to sight-read the music, with predictably disastrous results), and the work fell out of the repertory, eclipsed by more modernist concepts. Even today, it's a substantial budgetary undertaking for even the big British choirs Holst imagined. Hence this chamber arrangement for 15 players by Joseph Fort: the idea is to revive the work, which is doubtless interesting. The piece, unlike some others by Holst of the period, doesn't include much reference to actual Indian music, but it does have an attractively romantic-mystical atmosphere that survives the reduction in forces. The tale recounts the efforts of a king to have a cloud take a message to his wife in the Himalayan mountains. The paean to marital love was a bit out of fashion in the year of The Rite of Spring, but Holst's airy score, coming to rest in quiet ecstasy at the end, reflects the ancient text well. The Choir of King's College London and the Strand Ensemble achieve the right transparent texture, and the choir also does well with the encore, the Five Partsongs, Op. 12, also of a romantic nature. Certainly of interest to Holst buffs, this album will also attract those exploring the question of India in the British cultural mind. © TiVo
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Classical - Released November 16, 2018 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res
CD$4.99$9.99(50%)

Classical - Released January 3, 2012 | Oehms Classics

Holst's most popular composition is transcribed here for organ, which may please fans of the instrument but may or may not please fans of The Planets. The organ can't help but bring out all the grandeur and majesty of Holst's original. The power of the gods is unmistakable in the deep richness and sheer volume of the instrument's notes. "Mars" and "Jupiter" make the transfer to organ the most successfully, in those respects. The range of colors is quite broad in them, although, naturally, not as varied in timbres as that of full orchestra. And the build-up of sustained notes is a little muddying at times. "Uranus" is slightly plodding and lacking liveliness in the beginning, but then picks up steam so that the magician's power is evident . The least successful movement is "Mercury." The transcription just isn't always in a high enough register or flute-like, and Hansjörg Albrecht doesn't have the speed to convey Mercury's fleetness effectively. "Saturn" is kept in the lower registers, again making it hard to distinguish notes. The mystical nature of "Neptune" takes on more of a spookiness with the resonance of the organ. It's always interesting to hear how the capabilities of the king of instruments can be exploited and how close it can come to replicating orchestral colors, but this transcription delivers uneven results. © TiVo
CD$12.99

Classical - Released April 4, 1987 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Regarded as a masterful interpretation since its appearance in 1987, Charles Dutoit's award-winning recording of Gustav Holst's The Planets deserves all the praise it has received from fans and critics alike. Dutoit takes the Montréal Symphony Orchestra through the work's seven astrological movements with spot-on accuracy and determined drive, so the musicians stay alert and their energy never flags throughout this dazzling tone poem. "Mars, the Bringer of War," is naturally the test of any orchestra's mettle, and the machine-like rhythms and savagely dissonant fanfares are executed with devastating force and penetrating color. "Venus, the Bringer of Peace," sets a completely different mood, and the orchestra displays some of its softest and most ethereal timbres here. "Mercury, the Winged Messenger," is a fleet scherzo that shows off the woodwinds' dexterity, and "Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity," is an ebullient study of the orchestral palette, which sounds robust and full in this responsive digital recording. The darker movements that follow -- "Saturn, the Bringer of Old Age"; "Uranus, the Magician"; and "Neptune, the Mystic" -- present challenges that only a subtle conductor and an acute orchestra can meet, and Dutoit and the MSO convey their increasingly mysterious moods with remarkably controlled and nuanced playing. There are many recordings of The Planets that have appeared since this disc's release and that offer it as an audiophile showpiece, particularly in SACD formats with amazing multichannel surround-sound. However, this fairly early digital recording holds its own place, and listeners who want a great performance with really good reproduction can appreciate this disc without worrying about its standing among later, state-of-the-art recordings. Highly recommended. © TiVo
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Symphonic Music - Released February 1, 2011 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
The Planets is undeniably Holst's most popular composition, but this album's goal is to put it into the larger context of his output by including one orchestral piece written a few years before it and one piece written at about the same time. Both of the less familiar pieces have exotic themes -- Beni Mora, subtitled "Oriental Suite," and Japanese Suite -- but they avoid the fake orientalism of so much post-Romantic music, even though the second work uses some authentic Japanese tunes. They are solidly crafted, attractive pieces, but they lack the thematic distinctiveness that characterizes all of the movements of The Planets. The final movement of Beni Mora is intriguing in its repetition of a single accompanimental figure that continues almost through the work's entire length. The pieces are a logical extension of Holst's ongoing interest in Asian cultures and the integration of the aesthetic he had expressed in pieces like the opera Sávitri and the choral Hymn from the Rig Veda. Andrew Davis leads the BBC Philharmonic in subtle and energetic readings of the pieces, but it is in the spectacular orchestral writing of The Planets that they really dazzle. Their performance of "Mars" has all the pulse-quickening, churning ferocity, and volume the score calls for, beautifully contrasted with the stark, strange serenity of "Venus" and the individuality of each of the movements is strongly etched. Davis manages to tone down the plummy Britishness that sometimes characterizes "Jupiter" without tamping down its jovial character. In "Neptune," the women's voices (the women of the Manchester Chamber Choir) are a little too present; the balance would have benefited from more of a sense of mysterious remoteness. Otherwise the sound quality is superb: full, warm, and spacious. © TiVo
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Classical - Released December 8, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released July 17, 2020 | OA2 Records

HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Symphonic Music - Released January 27, 2009 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released October 1, 2013 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
CD$7.29

Classical - Released April 24, 2007 | Naxos

Booklet
Prior to this disc, Howard Griffiths was best known as a conductor of the lesser-known late-Classical/early-Romantic Austro-Germanic symphonists: Ignace Pleyel, Franz Krommer, Paul Wranitzky, and their ilk. On this 2005 Naxos disc he turns in spirited and soulful performances with the English Sinfonia of the music of English modernist Gustav Holst. By programming the well-known St. Paul and Brook Green Suites along with the less-well-known A Song of the Night for violin and orchestra and A Fugal Concerto for flute, oboe, and strings, Griffiths grants the listener familiar only with the composer's extremely well-known Planets Suite a much broader picture of Holst's achievement. The soloists are all consistently marvelous, although violist Andriy Viytovych is particularly impressive in his ardent performance of the late Lyric Movement for viola and chamber orchestra. The English Sinfonia's ensemble performances are powerfully cohesive, amazingly agile, strongly rhythmic, and, when it's called for, wonderfully atmospheric. But best of all, after years spent in the Austro-Germanic wilderness, Griffiths seems wholly sympathetic to Holst's richly intellectual, exquisitely colorful, austerely lyrical, and deeply if reservedly emotional music and his Holst performances are in the same league as Hickox, Hogwood, and perhaps even Boult. Recorded in lush sound at St. Clements Church, Islington, London, by producer Jakob Händel, these performances will gratify anyone who enjoys English modernist music in general and Holst in particular. © TiVo