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Symphonic Music - Released November 29, 2010 | Sony Classical

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An historical album if there is one, with its iconic cover photo. Conducting from the piano in Rhapsody in Blue, Leonard Bernstein manages to capture the lean vigor and impertinence that emanates from the work. He whips up a beefy orchestral contour while subtly jazzy, intensely inspired and romantic in feeling. The dynamic Suite An American in Paris is full of that energy that Bernstein used to know how to distil like no other did. Listen to the orchestra rip into the Charleston. These recordings, from 1958-59, are fabulous, and well worthy of their reference status. The famous West Side Story Symphonic Dances, and the Symphonic Suite "On the Waterfront" complete this album of American music bursting with infectious enthusiasm. © Qobuz 
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Classical - Released February 16, 2018 | Myrios Classics

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After several albums respectively dedicated to Liszt's Transcendental Études or Mussogorsky and Schumann, or to Concertos by Tchaikovsky (the First) and Prokofiev (the Second) for the Myrios Classics label, Russian-American pianist Kirill Gerstein is diving into the colourful and rhythmical world of Gershwin. Happily, he has chosen the Jazz Band (1924) version of Rhapsody in Blue, which he has transformed into an almost-cubist work, in perfect symbiosis with the equally-keen work of David Robertson: the piano-playing is really angular, sometimes chilling; the brass recalls the most modernist work of Bartók or Prokofiev or the new American music, at the start of the 1920s. The same goes for 1925's Concerto in F, the extraordinary Earl Wild's cool playing under the direction of Arthur Fiedler (RCA, 1959) dissipates with Gerstein and Robertson, to make way for more percussive sounds. Kirill Gerstein also offers - this album being made up of recordings made in concert - various arrangements (or paraphrases) of some of the more famous American songs, including a particularly juicy I Got Rhythm from Earl Wild. A particularly stimulating album for the winter months. © 2018 Théodore Grantet/Qobuz
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Opera - Released July 9, 2021 | PentaTone

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The ultimate American "folk opera". The Philadelphia Orchestra and conductor Marin Alsop present a live recording with highlights of Gershwin’s self-proclaimed American “Folk Opera” Porgy and Bess, together with a stellar cast and the Morgan State University Choir. Since its premiere in 1935, Porgy and Bess has been one of the most significant attempts to – following Antonin Dvořák’s famous instruction of 1893 – create American classical music inspired by Afro-American styles such as jazz, spirituals and the blues. It has also proven to be a powerful catalyst for bringing more diverse casts to the opera stage. The hard-knock life at a Charleston waterfront tenement is presented here by an outstanding cast including Lester Lynch (Porgy), Angel Blue (Bess, Clara and Serena), Chauncey Packer (Sportin’ Life) and Kevin Short (Crown, Jake). Multi-award-winning soprano Angel Blue is one of the most promising voices of her generation, while Chauncey Packer is arguably one of the greatest and sought-after Sportin’ Life interpreters today. Lester Lynch and Kevin Short both enjoy a flourishing stage career, as well as a vast Pentatone discography. © Pentatone
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Jazz - Released August 31, 2007 | Stockfisch Records

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Jazz - Released November 27, 2020 | ENJA RECORDS Matthias Winckelmann

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released October 13, 2017 | Alpha

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It’s not rare for jazz musicians to venture into the world of baroque, often with great success: so, asks Jos van Immerseel - why not the other way around? And so he decided to record... Gershwin. With the original instrumentation and arrangements, on period instruments! Gershwin's period, that is: not the period of sackbuts and cromornes. The piano used on Rhapsody in Blue was a 1906 Steinway; the piece was first orchestrated by Ferde Grofré in 1906 for a jazz band (Gershwin had dragged his feet and dawdled and the work was finally performed before the ink was dry: and even then, the piano part appears to have been almost completely improvised). Also present are the tranquil vision of an American in Paris as distilled by Immerseel; several songs by Claron McFarren, who is certainly not of that era, but whose voice cleaves closely to a recognisable North American inter-war style; while Gershwin's Magnum Opus, Porgy and Bess, is presented as an orchestral suite. There is no accounting for taste, and everyone will form their own view of this baroque-jazz interpretation of the tradition. But whatever your own personal preferences, this is an experience not to be missed.
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Country - Released February 26, 2016 | Legacy Recordings

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When George Gershwin died on July 11, 1937, Willie Nelson was only four year old. A few decades later, we speak of both artists as legends, two monuments of twentieth century music. Perhaps from opposing categories in music, but genius loves company and this fact erases any borders. And this record is further highlighted by the porosity of both worlds. In 2015, Willie received the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song, never before awarded to a country artist. This delicious album entitled Summertime - Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin is, therefore, no real surprise in terms of its quality. The nasal voice and of Texan marries to to perfection with the velvet melodies and perfect prose of Gershwin. Among the eleven selected titles, two are interpreted in duet with Cyndi Lauper (Let's Call the Whole Thing Off), and Sheryl Crow (Embraceable You) respectively. At over 82 years ago, Nelson is more crooner than ever here, but in his way that is completely his own. ©MZ/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 24, 2005 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released January 24, 2014 | Les Indispensables de Diapason

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Blues - Released December 4, 2020 | Evidence

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Jazz - Released October 16, 2020 | Karen Souza

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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Oehms Classics

European performers have cottoned to the fact that Gershwin and Ravel make a good pairing on disc: they knew each other and liked each other's music, and Ravel understood jazz better than any of his contemporaries, with the possible exception of Kurt Weill. The booklet for this German release goes on to sketch out a list of similarities between the two that reads like something out of Ripley's Believe It or Not: they both died of brain diseases in 1937, both were snappy dressers and players who never married, both smoked, and so on. Gershwin asked Ravel to take him on as a student, but was turned down with the now-classic question, "You're already a first-rate Gershwin? Why would you want to be a second-rate Ravel?" The Ravel Concerto for the left hand, composed in 1930, is ideal as a counterpoint to Rhapsody in Blue; it may be Ravel's jazziest work, and it similarly relies on sweeping piano figures juxtaposed with busier orchestral passages into which the piano is woven. The two works are separated by Gershwin's An American in Paris, given a peppy reading here by the Radio Symphony Orchestra of Vienna. The Viennese musicians seem a little less comfortable with the Rhapsody in Blue, although pianist Pascal Rogé gives attractive, tuneful but not oversentimental readings of both Gershwin's Rhapsody and the Concerto for the left hand. Clear SACD sound (sampled on a good conventional stereo) with impressive dynamic range from Oehms is another plus; the opening passages of the Ravel will show off the powers of good stereo equipment, and the kaleidoscopic quality of An American in Paris comes through in full. Not a definitive recording of any of the works involved, but a convincing whole. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released November 24, 2017 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released November 4, 2016 | Masterworks

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Classical - Released December 21, 2012 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released February 7, 2012 | Naxos

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Even without the Rhapsody in Blue, and even with the comparatively rarely heard Rhapsody No. 2 for piano and orchestra, there is absolutely no shortage of recordings of the music on this Naxos release. But it merits strong consideration from Gershwin fans, and not only for its budget price. The chief attraction is the Concerto in F, which pianist Orion Weiss and conductor JoAnn Falletta approach less as a cousin to the Rhapsody in Blue than as the most elaborate development of Gershwin's purely classical side. He set out to write a work in classical three-movement concerto form but actually achieved something slightly different: a group of unique ways of developing jazz- and blues-flavored material. The restrained, almost deliberate approach offered by Weiss and Falletta runs counter to type for Gershwin but brings out many small details in the concerto. It works a bit less well in the brash, cinematic Rhapsody No. 2 (the work, originally entitled "Rhapsody in Rivets," was written for a film soundtrack), but in the final I Got Rhythm Variations all the forces loosen up a bit, in keeping with the quasi-improvisatory nature of the work, and the variations make a satisfying finale. The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra is sharp throughout, with a brass section that responds well to the rhythmic qualities of Gershwin's scores, and the bright, spacious sound environment of the orchestra's Kleinhans Concert Hall home base is another plus. You can never have too many fresh, accurately executed Gershwin recordings. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 1, 2013 | Chandos

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Chinese pianist Xiayin Wang emerged as something of a specialist in American music with her spectacular recording of Earl Wild's Gershwin fantasias in 2010, and she continues to amass a strong track record with this Chandos release, nicely recorded at the Royal Concert Hall in Glasgow. It's interesting how novel the trio of piano concertos by Gershwin, Copland, and Barber are as a program, for they all have a great deal to say to each other, and each finds its way between jazz and modernistic influences. Given that you get here a Chinese pianist teaming with Scottish musicians, with not an American in sight, it's safe to say that the music is beginning to get the respect it deserves. Wang's performances of the Barber Piano Concerto, Op. 38, is wonderful. With clean, delicate passagework in the upper registers, she finds the composer's characteristic lyricism in this sometimes thorny score, and in the modernistic jazz of Copland's Piano Concerto, composed in 1926, is very nearly as good, tough and rhythmically brash. The weakest performance of the three, oddly enough in view of Wang's stellar work in Gershwin-related material previously, is the Gershwin Piano Concerto in F (not F major as the packaging and booklet have it here); there is nothing to object to, but the performance lacks the contained jazz energy that makes great readings of the piece work. The restraint may come from the Royal Scottish National Orchestra under Peter Oundjian, who are peppy throughout but are not confirmed Gershwin interpreters. This is, however, a revelatory program, very well performed. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 16, 2018 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released January 20, 2017 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released November 4, 2016 | Masterworks

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