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Classical - Released November 10, 2016 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
Giovanni Antonini's 2016 release with Il Giardino Armonico on Alpha Classics is a polished album of Baroque chamber music for recorder, alto and tenor chalumeaux (predecessors of the modern clarinet), solo violin, strings, and continuo. While the program opens with Jacques-Martin Hotteterre's brief Prélude for solo recorder, the rest of the program consists of four works by the prolific Georg Philipp Telemann, which show diversity of instrumentation and a mix of Baroque forms. The two works featuring a recorder soloist, the Suite in A minor and the Concerto in C major, are bright, attractive vehicles that shine a spotlight on Antonini for his virtuosity and controlled tone. In the Sonata in F major for two chalumeaux, violin, and continuo, Antonini plays tenor chalumeau and is joined by Tindaro Capuano on alto chalumeau and Liana Mosca on violin, and the rich sonorities of the two chalumeaux bring warmth to the performance. The Concerto di Camera in G minor for recorder, two violins, and continuo returns Antonini to his principal instrument and to the vigorous displays of the first half of the program. The church acoustics of San Marco, Milan provide a bit too much resonance for a true chamber feeling, though the musicians are closely recorded, and all of the solo parts are front and center. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 15, 2021 | PentaTone

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It is well-known that the baroque language is a kind of musical Esperanto whose codes spread throughout the European continent, each nation contributing to inspire, or possibly contaminate, its neighbours. Unlike the sedentary Johann Sebastian Bach who only travelled through his colleagues' scores, his prolific friend Georg Philipp Telemann travelled throughout Europe and retained in his works the style he had discovered in Poland. Like many of his contemporaries, Telemann seems to have been fascinated by Polish folk dances, which were very popular throughout Europe and known by various names: chorea polonica, baletto polacco, polnischer Tanz or saltus polonicus. But this music from Poland itself came from elsewhere before being transformed in turn. "After hearing the music of the taverns for just one week, one remains imbued with it for life", wrote Telemann.This enthusiasm is conveyed to us today by the violinist Aisslinn Nosky and her Holland Baroque ensemble, through a bouquet of works perfectly reflecting the musical whirlwind heard by Telemann in Krakow and the surrounding area. Polonié, Polonesie, Concertos-Polonois, Partie Polonois, Hanac come to recreate the joy of dance and the bitter perfumes of pipes, all drenched in an alcohol that should not be consumed in moderation. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released March 23, 2018 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
From the start of the 18th century, Lutheran Germany has kept the tradition of performing an oratorio for the Passion in Holy Week. In Hamburg, where Telemann is said to have spent 46 years as musical director, he would have overseen as many Passions. But if we include his previous jobs, that would take the number of works by Telemann for this theme alone to over sixty! These Passions could be strictly liturgical, that is, they could closely follow the text of one of the Gospels; but they could also liberally paraphrase the story of the Passion, following a version by a contemporary author; or they could represent a meditation on the events. And so Seliges Erwägen by Telemann, whose full title leaves no doubt as to the content: Oratorio of the Passion, or Spiritual Contemplation on the bitter suffering and death of Jesus Christ, to inspire prayer, in several meditations taken from the account of the Passion. Not a linear account of the Passion, as with Bach: but a series of individual meditations set to music. The work was first composed in 1719, and then reviewed and completed three years later for Hamburg, where the first performance took place on 19 March 1722 the success was considerable, and the work was performed again and again many times throughout the following decades. This was probably the most-performed work on the Passion in the 18th century, out ahead even of Telemann's Brockes Passion... There is no evangelist here, nor storyteller, but rather an evocation of the main events of the Passion. That is why there are only two main "roles" here: Christ, with six airs and six recitations, and the allegory of the Devotion (soprano or tenor) as the mouthpiece for the thoughts of the faithful, with eight airs and eight recitations. The sole narrator is Peter, with his denial and despair, and Caiaphas, the high priest who condemns Jesus, comes on for a single, very violent, air. This is very much a series of individual devotional meditations. The instrumentation in particular is extraordinarily rich. Alongside the strings, the continuo and the standard woodwind, a dash of colour is added by two horns, two chalumeaux, ancestors of the clarinet – what a pity that Bach never made the most of this sound – echoing recorders, a magnificent bassoon solo that intermingles with the soprano's voice; in short, once again, Teleman proves to us that far from being a mill for middle-of-the-road baroque, he is in fact one of the most imposing musical minds of his age. The Freiburger Barockorchester and a lovely soloists come together to perform this work.. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 15, 2019 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Often seen as playing second fiddle to his close friend Johann Sebastian Bach, Georg Philipp Telemann is making a spirited comeback and taking his place among the best composers of his day. In the manner of a Vivaldi production, Telemann's abundant work can be intimidating in its sheer quantity. A multiple instrumentalist, violinist, conductor, ensemble performer, Gottfried von der Goltz has dug up this group of six sonatas referred to as the Frankfurt Sonatas, named for the town where they were published in 1715. Leaving the Court of Bach's native Eisenach, Telemann set up in Frankfurt in 1712 as the chapelmaster of the Franciscan church. He would become one of the richest citizens of the town thanks to the ample emoluments he received in this post. These six sonatas are written in "stilo francese", all divided into four movements: a solemn overture followed by a faster second movement, and then a cantabile finishing with a lively, virtuoso finale. This strict schema gives range to a range of sonatas, which vary widely in their writing style and steer clear of the then-fashionable trio-sonata form, offering a tremendous free rein to the lead instrument. They are only equalled by Bach's sonatas for flute and violin. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 8, 2013 | Arcana

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
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Chamber Music - Released January 8, 2021 | CPO

Booklet
Georg Philipp Telemann’s chamber oeuvre has always had a significant place in the repertoire of the Camerata Köln. The ensemble’s contributions to this field have included complete recordings of magnificent cyclical work groups such as his Essercizii musici, Trios of 1718, Six Concerts et Suites, Die kleine Kammermusik, and Der getreue Music-Meister. The present release rounds off the complete recording of Telemann’s concertos with wind instruments on a total of 16 albums on CPO. The Baroque orchestra La Stagione Frankfurt led by Michael Schneider performed the orchestral compositions, and the Camerata Köln was responsible for the chamber works – and the wind soloists of the two ensembles are identical. The second release of the Concerti da Camera once again contains chamber masterpieces by Telemann featuring a complex texture of parts in a concerto style in which each of the concertizing instruments is allowed to come forward with thematic material as well as with figurations. © CPO
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Classical - Released May 24, 2019 | Ramée

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
No eighteenth-century composer was so adept at so many musical styles as Georg Philipp Telemann. Telemann's versatility and inventiveness kept his musical style avant-garde during his entire life. He was not only praised by his contemporaries but was highly respected by the next generation: his fame was immense. Thererfore New Collegium, one of the promising ensembles of the younger generation, has chosen for their first studio recording on the Ramée label to show Telemann the chameleon, the breadth of his musical palette. Some of the pieces will undoubtedly sound familiar; others, such as the Italianate Trio for violin and cello obbligato, or the pastoral Trio for two violins in scordatura, will surely be delightful, new surprises for many. Coming in and out of disguise with Telemann’s chameleonic notes we often find ourselves wondering: is this truly music by just one composer, not six? © Ramée
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Classical - Released January 8, 2021 | CPO

Booklet
The work group formed by Telemann’s overture suites is regarded as exemplary and even today offers a wealth of discoveries – and the three works presented here in album recording premieres certainly answer this description. It is difficult to determine the chronological order of Telemann’s extant overture suites because the composer incorporated very different influences into them, not only from French music since the invention of the form by Jean-Baptiste Lully but also from the “Lullists” active in Germany such as Johann Sigismund Kusser, Philipp Heinrich Erlebach, and Johann Fischer. And for Telemann’s pronounced tendency to mix existing formal, stylistic, and generic traditions, the overture suite formed an absolutely ideal foil. Here we can find diverse characters, formal combinations, and stylistic interconnections in great supply. The great imagination and spirit at work here are also shown in the plentiful stores of surprising ideas that shine like flashes of brainstorm lightning in various passages. © CPO
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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Accent

Booklet
The Mediterranean Sea has been the hub of resettlement and migration for centuries. After the fall of the Byzantine Empire, the people who settled in those areas that were depopulated by years of war, expulsion and flight. And in 1492, the Spanish Reconquista led to the expulsion of the Sephardic Jews, who brought their culture to many countries around the Mediterranean. Even today, the Mediterranean again plays an inglorious role in flight and expulsion. The German gambist Friederike Heumann has taken this as an opportunity to present, together with the Turkish singer Nihan Devecioglu and the Spanish guitarist Xavier Díaz-Latorre, the many ancient cultures around the Mediterranean: the tradition of the Sephardic people, songs from Lebanon, Turkey, Armenia and Greece, art music from Venice to Fado in Spain and Portugal, whose influences reach as far as South America. © Accent
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Concertos - Released April 21, 2017 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
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Chamber Music - Released January 12, 2015 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released October 7, 2014 | Oehms Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released July 16, 2021 | CPO

Booklet
“Specializing in unknown repertoire, CPO is now serious about uncovering yet another veritable treasure:” this is what "Klassik-Heute" wrote of Vol. 1 of the Wind Overtures by Telemann. This master of all musical trades was also active and extremely successful in the field of "Harmoniemusik" – the compositional genre for wind ensembles entrusted with military, hunting, and table music. The wind version of the work known as the “Alster"-Overture heard along with other works on Vol. 2 is regarded as a model example of this artistic philosophy of Telemann’s. However, what is a more important key to the significance of the work is the knowledge that the movements following the overture are practically to be understood as an audio instrumental preview of the serenata composed by Telemann and going along with them. In this overture-suite the “musical artist” presents to our ears highly atmospheric sound depictions of Hamburg and what were then its country surroundings, through which the Alster River flowed. Even the singing swans majestically gliding along the Alster are represented in a wonderfully beautiful sarabande. At the end there is a spirited gigue in which shepherds, hunters, nymphs, and Pan, as it were, gather together again in order to conclude the musical preview anticipating the "serenade". © CPO
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Classical - Released September 30, 2016 | Glossa

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Classical - Released August 13, 2021 | CPO

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This album features three dazzling but previously only little-known compositions for royals from Telemann’s immense trove of vocal music. The selections have been chosen from the field of commissioned and occasional compositions written for special occasions such as acts of homage, funerary ceremonies, weddings, birthdays, and inaugurations. Two works from Telemann’s primary creative field, that of church music, round off the program. The three works featured on this recording have in common points of reference to the particular English kings during whose reigns they were written; these monarchs were also in personal union the Prince Electors of Braunschweig-Lüneburg (for short: “Electors of Hanover”). All three works are distinguished by scoring for an ensemble with trumpets as “royal instruments” – sometimes in a majestic function, sometimes in a tonally subdued, mournful function – and with a bass singer as the vocal representative of the monarch. These works brimming with ideas and designed with virtuosity and color are from the master’s late compositional period and, depending on the particular occasion, express gratitude, appreciation, or grief vis-à-vis the British-Hanoverian rulers. Although these feelings certainly first and foremost reflect the stance of those who commissioned them, Telemann’s musical settings lend them universal appeal. © CPO
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Classical - Released March 13, 2007 | Evidence

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Classical - Released July 16, 2021 | CPO

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Between 1717 and 1765 Georg Philipp Telemann composed more than 1 700 cantatas for performance on all the Sundays of the church year. Some dozen annual cycles from his period as music director in Frankfurt am Main and above all those from his Hamburg years have come down to us. In quantitative terms, the four Sundays of Advent and the three days of Christmas are the most strongly represented – with almost about two hundred cantatas. Apart from the cantatas for solo voice and solo instrument with basso continuo from his anthology Harmonischer Gottesdienst of 1725, only a few compositions for larger ensembles from this treasure trove have been edited and recorded. This album features four cantatas by Telemann that may be regarded as world-premiere recordings. They are musical gems that impress us with their melodic originality and musical character and even after more than 250 years are very much worth being performed again! © CPO
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Classical - Released August 25, 2014 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released October 28, 2016 | Accent

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Classical - Released January 4, 2019 | CPO

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