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Classical - Released November 8, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released November 22, 2019 | Alia Vox

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Classical - Released November 8, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 18, 2019 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released November 1, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 25, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Sacred Vocal Music - Released October 24, 2014 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released December 1, 1991 | harmonia mundi

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Cantatas (secular) - Released November 23, 2018 | Erato

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Record of the Month - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Archiv Produktion

Distinctions Diapason d'or du siècle - Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released October 9, 2007 | LSO Live

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Full Operas - Released November 2, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released May 4, 2015 | ECM New Series

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Classical - Released February 5, 2016 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
For this performance, Philippe Jaroussky has picked a bouquet of pieces from lesser-known operas. Siroe, Riccardo primo, Flavio, Tolomeo and many others, written for the London stage between 1715 and 1740. With his Artaserse ensemble, which Jaroussky considers to have been the place where he has been able to fully mature, over several years of playing concerts all over the world,  the counter-tenor also presents a reflection on the repertoire of the castrato. Because, since this little procedure was discontinued, the singers tackling these roles have been performing airs which were not written for us, and have to be adapted to us. Bearing in mind that when Haendel put on an opera with a different troupe, he didn't hesitate to re-work entire roles to adapt them to new singers; Jaroussky has taken it upon himself to do the same for some of these airs, which he knows are not suited to his type of voice, and for which original versions with the correct tones are not always available. Regardless, this is an excellent exploration of Haendel's rarities, with some virtuoso turns, and material running from the introverted to the narrative, the lyrical to the explosive. Note that Artaserse are playing without a conductor, Jaroussky leading from the front, with his voice. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 1983 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released October 1, 2012 | Passacaille

Hi-Res Distinctions Diapason d'or - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Prise de Son d'Exception
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Classical - Released October 13, 2017 | Alpha

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Why record yet another of Handel’s Messiah, asks Hervé Niquet, when the market is already flooded by over a hundred different references? And he answers that he went through the different scores that exist and decided on the very interesting 1754 version which features five soloists instead of the usual four, devised for the annual Messiah production at London’s Foundling Hospital. It must be remembered that, when Handel arrived somewhere to perform his oratorio, he had soloists of varying standards available to him. So he would quickly revise his score accordingly to produce a new version form of his Messiah. When examining the various rewritings that resulted, one may observe that soprano arias have been transposed for alto, that a bass aria has been reduced to half its length – the singer for that particular production must have been rather weak. All this is directly related to the reality of Handel’s situation as a concert promoter. In those days, to earn a living from his music, a composer – royalties did not exist yet, and publishers would recklessly pillage scores without bothering to refer to the composer – had to get his works performed and make a profit on the box office. The idea of not retouching a work to avoid ‘spoiling’ or ‘distorting’ it is a much more modern one. There must be around a dozen versions of Messiah, most by Handel himself, others rewritten later – by Mozart for one of them. The 1754 version is rarely performed because it calls for five soloists: two sopranos, alto, tenor and bass. The listener of this new recording will thus be sent back over 250 years ago in London’s Foundling Hospital. © SM/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released February 9, 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica
It was for the occasion of the Covent Garden premiere of his oratorio Joshua in 1748, that Handel composed – or rather arranged – the first of his three Concerti a due cori (« Cori » does not mean here a vocal group, but two instrumental groups – two oboes, two horns, and one bassoon each, a total of ten soloists – answering to each other on the playing grounds provided by the strings), namely the HWV 332. At that time, it was customary to lighten up performances of the largest compositions, especially oratorios, with a sprinkling of instrumental pieces. But as Handel was a busy man and a businessman, and producing so much music so fast was no easy feat. This accounts for the fact that so many of his instrumental pieces are in fact recyclings – transcriptions, reorchestrations, transcriptions, according to what was available and requested – of earlier works, mostly his own, sometimes that of fellow composers – who would not necessarily be informed of the pillage. In the case of Concerto a due cori No. 1, Handel plundered a handful of his own operas and oratorios. The second of Handel's Concerti a due cori, HWV 333, written around the beginning of 1747, was premiered at Covent Garden in 1748 as part of a huge musical banquet, the main course of which was the brand new oratorio Alexander Balus. Here, the composer drew from some of his own English oratorios: Esther and Messiah, the latter still quite unknown. The wind groups take over melodic lines given to singers in the original choral versions of the adapted music. The third Concerto, HWV 334, contains mostly brand new music – yes! – even though the first movement is reworked in part from Handel's so-called Fitzwilliam Overture, for two clarinets and horn, while the concluding Allegro, with its brilliant and difficult horn writing, is a rewrite of a hunting aria from his own opera Partenope. For this recording, the Freiburger Barockorchester has added a twist: each soloist group is accompanied by its own string ensemble, thus creating a higly energetic stereo effect. One orchestra is conducted (from the violin) by Gottfried von der Goltz, the other – also from the Konzertmeister position – by Petra Müllejans. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Qobuzissime - Hi-Res Audio