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Keyboard Concertos - Released April 19, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Le Choix de France Musique
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Concertos - Released July 26, 2011 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released February 3, 2017 | LSO Live

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Symphonies - Released June 16, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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With Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting, the Chamber Orchestra of Europe here presents Mendelssohn’s complete Symphonies (Nos. 1 to 5), composed between 1824 and 1842. Considered by some to be “the best chamber orchestra in the world” (BBC2 Television), the Chamber Orchestra of Europe was born three decades ago from the desire of several young musicians of the former European Union Youth Orchestra (EUYO) to pursue the adventure as an orchestra. After a few – unavoidable – changes within its ranks, this ensemble – currently – based in London retains the spirit that prevailed over its creation, shaped by complicity, generosity and liberty. Without a dedicated music director or conductor, the orchestra is now reunited with Yannick Nézet-Séguin, with whom there is, according to the latter, “a completely unique bond”. Their most recent releases, such as in Mozart’s operas, highlighted this shared complicity. And, after a complete collection on Schumann, it is only fair that the conductor and his musicians explore the effusive lyric, the “classical” side of German romanticism, by working on Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy’s five symphonies. But the aim however with these five symphonies is to explore widely differing universes: the very romantic Symphony No. 3, “the Scottish”, in which Wagner heard a “prime landscaper”; Symphony No. 4, “the Italian”, is almost a great symphonic poem, as illustrated (by?) numerous composers after 1834; Symphony No. 2, “Lobgesang”, ends on an immense cantata full of praise, which approach was inspired by Beethoven’s Ninth; Symphony No. 5 is strongly linked to Protestant religion, as its fugue finale cites one of the Lutheran chorales used, notably, by Johann Sebastian Bach: “Eine feste Burg ist unser Gott” (Our God is a secure fortress) (cf. Cantata BWV 80). © Qobuz, based on a Philarmonie de Paris leaflet for concerts in Paris, February 2016.
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Classical - Released August 27, 2012 | Signum Records

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Keyboard Concertos - Released February 1, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1974 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 15, 1979 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released February 5, 2013 | Naxos

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Classical - Released June 22, 2018 | Channel Classics Records

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With one of the very best orchestras in the world, the Budapest Festival Orchestra, one of today’s most fascinating conductor, Iván Fischer, offers one of the most beautiful recent interpretations of Mendelssohn’s integral A Midsummer Night's Dream. In other words: first the Overture, the phenomenal stroke of genius of a seventeen-year-old – one can only wonder where he discovered all of these orchestral inventions, as in 1826, templates were still rare and Berlioz had yet to enter the musical scene. Afterwards, the remaining pieces were composed sixteen years later for the theatrical presentation of Shakespeare’s play with musical interludes: thirteen very diverse pieces, ranging from the fabulous Scherzo − a masterpiece of finesse and orchestral invention – to delicious singing moments, as well as a pre-Mahler funeral march (reminiscent of Frère Jacques from Mahler’s Symphony No. 1), the overly well-known wedding march, the grotesque dance, and many more. There is little doubt that this is, if not Mendelssohn’s greatest masterpiece, at least one of his absolute pinnacle works. Presented here in a truly irresistible interpretation. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released July 21, 1980 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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It’s with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra that Leonard Bernstein undertook the project to describe the Scottish mist from Felix Mendelssohn’s Overture The Hebrides and Symphony No. 3. The bond between this orchestra and Bernstein was particularly strong, from his very first concert in Palestine in 1947 until his death. In 1948 he performed a concert for the armed forces in the recently formed state that had a tremendous impact, with Bernstein becoming a cult figure among Israelis. He directed the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra every year and made several recordings with them. In this one, the orchestra’s winged virtuosity and limpid colours are absolutely remarkable, and once again, the extraordinary energy of the American conductor stands out, with his way of bringing musical phrases to life by making Mendelssohn’s radiant romanticism shine. The overture The Hebrides is no less than a musical miracle, full of melodic beauty and well constructed, making it a sort of marine musical painting, a precursor of impressionism, in the same way Turner’s paintings often suggest more than they show. Written during several trips, the “Scottish” Symphony, which received the favour of young Queen Victoria – to whom the piece was dedicated −, remains one of Mendelssohn’s most popular works due to the richness of its melodies and its atmosphere so conducive to dreams and imagination. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Symphonies - Released March 3, 2017 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
Mendelssohn’s warmly lyrical and evocative Scottish symphony is paired with his confident and precocious first symphony for the first in a series of recordings in multi-channel surround sound for PENTATONE by the conductor Andrew Manze and the NDR Radiophilharmonie. It’s no wonder that Robert Schumann dubbed Mendelssohn the “Mozart of the nineteenth century”; with his felicitous gift for melody and meticulous craftsmanship, his music positively brims with youthful spontaneity and exuberance, blending dreamy poetic flights with moments of affecting tenderness and serenity. Inspired by his visits to Scotland and the Hebrides and the romantic novels of Sir Walter Scott, his outstanding Symphony No. 3 in A minor (“Scottish”) is a colourful reminiscence of its rugged landscapes steeped in history, and an affectionate homage to the proud Highlanders he met there. It was an instant success on its first performance and rivals the popularity of the overture The Hebrides, also inspired by the splendour of Scotland. No less impressive is his masterly Symphony No. 1 in C minor, composed when he was just 15 years old. From its noisy and impetuous opening to its triumphant conclusion, this confident and adventurous work shows the influence of Mozart, Haydn and Weber but the effect is unmistakeably Mendelssohnian with fugal passages, unforgettable melodies and busy, inventive scoring. (Text from the Pentatone website)
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Symphonic Music - Released September 1, 2017 | LSO Live

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Symphonic Music - Released September 21, 2018 | LSO Live

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Keyboard Concertos - Released September 28, 2010 | PentaTone

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Mendelssohn did not set out to write his first piano concerto until the age of 23, relatively late considering the composer's short lifetime. He had reservations about his ability to produce a concerto that was more than just pyrotechnic bravura. Indeed, the first concerto is filled with Mendelssohn's trademark mercurial filigree and brisk, busy passages, but he also achieves a wonderful sense of stillness and serenity in the central Andante that contrasts beautifully with the outer movements. The Second Concerto came about some five years later and already Mendelssohn's growth as a composer can be heard with the concerto's more serious, refined, and less showy nature. Performing these two energizing but sometimes overlooked concertos, as well as the Op. 29 Rondo brillant, is pianist Martin Helmchen and the Royal Flemish Philharmonic under Philippe Herreweghe. Apart from Helmchen's commanding technical skills and clear musical direction, and the RFP's sensitive but authoritative accompaniment, what makes this album an especially successful one is tone of the piano itself and PentaTone's recorded sound quality. Helmchen's piano is a tiny bit bright, and even a little dry, which actually serves Mendelssohn quite well; every note comes out crystal clear, even in the busiest, most complicated passages. PentaTone's highly detailed SACD layer gives even more definition to the piano and allows the orchestra to be punchy and vivacious without obscuring Helmchen in the slightest. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 2, 2018 | PentaTone

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Andrew Manze started his music career as a baroque violinist with the Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir, and then the Academy of Ancient Music and the English Concert. Only later he started dabbling in more ancient repertoires, ranging from romanticism to modern partitions, conducting non-baroque classical orchestras. As the head of the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra, he gives us a profoundly delicate and transparent interpretation, with great care given to respect Mendelssohn’s partition, highlighting countless little details. The listener will no doubt feel like he’s hearing Mendelssohn’s Italian for the first time, or at least believe he’s discovering a long-forgotten original version: but no, it is exactly the partition as we know it, or at least as we thought we knew. As for the Symphony “Reformation”, it is here more designed like a fine and beautiful orchestral score rather than an unpalatable reformed mammoth. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 6, 2008 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released June 1, 2018 | PentaTone

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Classical - Released April 7, 2014 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released September 29, 2017 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - Qobuzissime - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
For their first recording, the Arod Quartet has selected Mendelssohn, one of the pillars of the quartet's art, in particular his masterpiece, the Fourth Quartet in E Minor of June 1837 - more Mozartian than Beethovian in its structure and development, to be sure, even if it bears Mendelssohn's hallmark from the first note to the last. To find the influence of the deaf genius, we have to look in the Second Quartet Op. 13 of 1827, a work written shortly after Beethoven's death, the full extent of whose innovations Mendelssohn was only just discovering. The Arod Quartet continues its album with Four Pieces for Quartet, assembled posthumously and numbered Op. 81 by Mendelssohn's successor at the Gewandhaus, Julius Rietz, and based on four disparate pieces from various eras. Finally, the album closes with the Arod's re-interpretaton of a Lied, sung here by Marianne Crebassa, whose theme takes in several passages from Beethoven note for note, a real homage from the young composer to his illustrious elder. It’s worth noting that the Arod Quartet, only founded in 2013, has shot to global prominence, having performed at the Paris Philharmonic, the Louvre Auditorium, the Théâtre des Bouffes du Nord, the Metz Arsenal, and further afield the Salzburg Mozarteum, the Vienna Konzerthaus, the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the Zurich Tonhalle, London's Wigmore Hall, as well as in Tokyo, Finland, Switzerland... the list goes on! © SM/Qobuz