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Rock - Released December 11, 2020 | Reprise

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Pop - Released October 2, 2020 | Nonesuch

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American folk is a traditional affair. It’s historically patriotic. Old songs are handed down from generation to generation, evolving as they go. Musicians play together as a family, passing the torch from one to the next. Joachim Cooder is no exception to the rule. He’s Ry Cooder’s son, an incredible musician with a broad vision for folk. Joachim often played with his father and here his father accompanies him on Over That Road I’m Bound, his debut album dedicated to covering old-time musician Uncle Dave Macon’s repertoire. Macon, who was born in 1870 and died in 1952, was one of the founding fathers of folk and country. He was immediately recognisable thanks to his high-pitched nasal voice and lively banjo playing. Joachim Cooder does of course respect Macon’s sound, but he also modernises the songs, almost appropriating them. On the opening track he plays the electric mbira, a strange African-inspired instrument that’s like a cross between a xylophone and a thumb piano, with a graceful sound that sets the tone for the rest of the album. His arrangements bring Africa to mind (you can hear echoes of Vieux Farka Touré, Ali’s son on guitar) as well as Ireland and the Appalachians. The vocal harmonies glide around like a warm breeze and the string instruments (guitar, violin, banjo...) weave new patterns into the fabric of Uncle Dave Macon’s songs. The record is beautifully produced: subtle, modern, soft to the ear and never old-fashioned. Joachim Cooder is definitely his father’s son. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 9, 2020 | Warner Records

The Linkin Park phenomenon in the year 2000 confirmed the rise of nu-metal in the mainstream. Their debut album, Hybrid Theory, opened up new musical and commercial avenues, selling what’s now approaching 30 million copies. Three years after their lead singer Chester Bennington died, the time has come to celebrate. This anniversary box set contains the original album as well as Reanimation (the remixed version released two years later by the band’s guitarist and rapper Mike Shinoda) and the Hybrid Theory EP, the group’s very first album released in 1999. Following these albums we are treated to a B-sides and Rarities, making the box set a particularly interesting release. The album also showcases the band’s love for England (where their music was lapped up) with live BBC broadcasts of tracks like In the End and Papercut on which Bennington holds back on his usually-hoarse voice for a softer take. The same can’t be said for the live performances at London’s Docklands Arena where the tracks A Place In My Head and Points of Authority end up sounding like a gigantic wall of sound. Then there are the LPU Rarities, the fifth part of the box set. Composed of studio scraps and demos, it shows how Linkin Park evolved and includes Mike Shinoda’s work on drum machines and synthesizers. The group’s electronic side is emphasised here, forecasting the band’s sonic evolution and their leader’s solo career. Finally, to bring things to a close, the Forgotten Demos bring twelve unreleased tracks together from a time when Linkin Park were still called Xero. They were operating anonymously and did not yet have Chester Bennington in their ranks but rather singer Mike Wakefield. The sound was much more raw and simplistic. It’s in this final part that we find the origin of one of the most important groups of the last twenty years. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released June 26, 2020 | Lucky Mojo Records

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Christmas Music - Released December 1, 2020 | Sumerian Records

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Punk / New Wave - Released July 24, 2020 | Closed Casket Activities

On their long-awaited debut album, Gulch flawlessly justify their standing as one of the most hyped acts in hardcore. Across just eight songs in 15 minutes, the Santa Cruz group summon the beastly force of metalcore and the spasmodic heft of powerviolence, all while maintaining the energy and primal swagger of hardcore. Like many of the genre's greatest bands, Gulch came to prominence for their fearsome live show. Even if they weren't able to capture the electric presence of their set on here (which they do), a collection of rudimentary songs that were menacing enough to send post-pandemic pits into frenzies would have been just fine. However, the most pleasant surprise about Impenetrable Cerebral Fortress is how listenable it is. Save for its bullet-spraying intro track, most of the songs begin with an instrumental passage that allots some necessary breathing room and gives each, mostly sub-two-minute cut its own distinguishing character. Gulch are in and out in the span of a local opener's set here, but the record is surprisingly breathable and doesn't feel rushed or strung together haphazardly. That said, the feral character that Gulch is known for is still completely intact. Elliot Morrow screams like he's actively trying to pop blood vessels, heaving and huffing ad-libbed yawps during a track like "All Fall Down The Well", and shrieking the refrain of "Self-Inflicted Mental Terror" with so much force that his words are barely intelligible. Each song finds its way into either a savage mosh part or a gnarly two-step riff, but there are tasteful moments of grindcore drumming and death metal riffing that push things even further. The record will surely cement Gulch's status as one of this era's finest heavy hardcore bands, but its best track might be the terrific outlier of a closer, "Sin In My Heart". After 12 minutes of slavering brutality, this song begins with clean melodic guitar leads, tempered drumming, and a pained vocal delivery that's more akin to post-hardcore bands like Ceremony and Modern Life Is War. After a minute and a half, the distortion kicks in and it's back to the pit floor, but the rest of the track has an unexpectedly bright and catchy character to it for a band as nasty as Gulch. It's a salient indication that Impenetrable Cerebral Fortress is more than just an overdue gift to fans who've been rocking their sweatshirts since 2018. It’s a promise that Gulch has much more to offer. © Eli Enis/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 11, 2020 | Reprise

In the 15 months between the release of Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere and After the Gold Rush, Neil Young issued a series of recordings in different styles that could have prepared his listeners for the differences between the two LPs. His two compositions on the Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young album Déjà Vu, "Helpless" and "Country Girl," returned him to the folk and country styles he had pursued before delving into the hard rock of Everybody Knows; two other singles, "Sugar Mountain" and "Oh, Lonesome Me," also emphasized those roots. But "Ohio," a CSNY single, rocked as hard as anything on the second album. After the Gold Rush was recorded with the aid of Nils Lofgren, a 17-year-old unknown whose piano was a major instrument, turning one of the few real rockers, "Southern Man" (which had unsparing protest lyrics typical of Phil Ochs), into a more stately effort than anything on the previous album and giving a classic tone to the title track, a mystical ballad that featured some of Young's most imaginative lyrics and became one of his most memorable songs. But much of After the Gold Rush consisted of country-folk love songs, which consolidated the audience Young had earned through his tours and recordings with CSNY; its dark yet hopeful tone matched the tenor of the times in 1970, making it one of the definitive singer/songwriter albums, and it has remained among Young's major achievements. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Folk/Americana - Released February 9, 2021 | Keeled Scales

Says Katy: « I’ve always been uneasy with the idea of alternate universes, or realities. Even choose-your-own-adventure books used to stress me out. I wondered if it might be equally interesting and more helpful to consider “alternate universes” something as simple as other people. Around the time I wrote this song, I had been considering what I’d retain from a relationship if or when it ended —what I might be left with in the long run, after it didn’t hurt anymore. I realized that it’d be an alternate version of myself. Hell, how many parts of whatever I call a self aren’t even accessible without a particular interaction? The idea of “Portals” is just a nod to this notion that transformation is almost always painful. “Portals” is me thinking about the alternate, purely interior worlds that slide open with each person/universe we intersect with, and if what we think of as “closeness” to that person has anything to do with what gets opened.»
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Africa - Released June 8, 2020 | Laure Compagny

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Folk/Americana - Released August 27, 2020 | Gearbox Records

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