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Concertos for wind instruments - Released October 19, 2018 | Accent

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
In 1709, the music-loving Landgraf Ernst Ludwig from Darmstadt had discovered Christoph Graupner as a harpsichordist at the Hamburg Opera in 1709 and had hired him on the spot. The Landgraf had made a real stroke of luck with Graupner, because he was not only an outstanding musician but also a perfect organizer of the courtly musical life and especially for the church music which had to be performed weekly. Over the years, more than 1,400 works of sacred music and more than 250 concertos and orchestral works have gathered from his pen and paper. L’arpa festante and Rien Voskuilen have put together an exquisite selection with orchestral music from this repertoire for the present album: two concertos for oboes and trumpets and two Ouvertures for transverse flute in the French style, probably all from the first half of the 1730’s. © Accent
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Classical - Released September 21, 2018 | Christophorus

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released May 25, 2012 | Challenge Classics

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Chamber Music - Released November 2, 2018 | K&K Verlagsanstalt

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released February 16, 2018 | Accent

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
What a shame Graupner’s name is mostly remembered in conjunction with his contemporary, Johann Sebastian Bach: indeed the Leipzig authorities wanted to hire Graupner – whose employer at the time, the court of Hesse-Darmstadt, raised his salary, getting him to stay in this position for his entire life – as Thomaskantor after Telemann and three other musicians declined the offer. Then came a moment of immense administrative stupidity, as the city council decided to hire Bach, declaring: ”For important reasons, the situation is delicate and since the best men are not available, mediocre ones must be considered”. But this is not the point here: Graupner is far from mediocre himself, and his talent quickly comes through upon listening to these three cantatas (out of some 1,400 cantatas that have survived to this day!) and two orchestral works (out of over 200 ensemble pieces). His melodic and harmonic language is extremely rich, and he doesn’t hesitate to borrow from “old-school” resources to write his music, while often exploring the lyrical idiom of his time, particularly from Italy. Here, the delightful soprano Dorothee Mields is supported by the ensemble Harmonie universelle, led alternately on the violin by Florian Deuter and Mónica Waisman. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 7, 2014 | Christophorus

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released March 1, 2011 | Carus

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Accent

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 9 de Classica-Répertoire
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Classical - Released June 7, 2019 | CPO

Booklet
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Classical - Released December 7, 2018 | CPO

Booklet
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Classical - Released April 7, 2015 | CPO

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released February 21, 2006 | Analekta

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Classical - Released September 20, 2010 | CPO

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Classical - Released September 16, 2008 | Analekta

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Classical - Released March 23, 2018 | CPO

Booklet
Almost a precise contemporary of Handel and Rameau, Christoph Graupner (1683-1760) was the "second choice" of the Leipzig city council in 1723, when they had to choose a new Cantor and Telemann turned them down. We know that Graupner didn't get permission from his employer to leave for Leipzig, and so their third choice was Bach: the council was annoyed at having to "settle for a mediocrity". Graupner stayed in Darmstadt, where, throughout his long career, he managed to write 1,400 devotional cantatas – and we can only salute the decision of his legatees to defy his dying wish that his works be destroyed! That said, posterity would see his work largely consigned to the shadows: a truly unjust state of affairs, given that Graupner was an exceptional composer, as demonstrated by these five cantatas which were written for Epiphany. Exceptional: and also a great musical curiosity, because, although he never left Germany, he set about copying out the music of his European contemporaries for his own edification; and his own scores brought in various rare instruments, such as the flûte d’amour, the oboe d'amore, the viola d'amore, and, more adventurously, the chalumeau – an ancestor of the clarinette, heard here in the cantata Die Waßer Wogen im Meer sind groß, one of the less-common sounds in baroque music, although often used in Vivaldi and Teleman. The five works on this album were written between 1730 and 1753: the composer's mature period, in which his language and imagination were overflowing with originality. His breadth of vision for want of a better word, the artful contrasts, the rarity of the orchestral sounds, give this music a profound air of mystery: the sheer number of his works in circulation have probably put off a number of performers who perhaps mistake such a great quantity for a dilution of quality. Alas... If Graupner had only limited himself to writing five cantatas, his works would be lauded to the heavens – and commentators would regret that he never wrote more. © SM/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released June 15, 2018 | CPO

Booklet
This is the second instalment of the Das Leiden Jesu, written by Graupner for Lent in 1741 at the court of Darmstadt. As was his wont, the composer experimented freely – in his day, he had a lot of latitude from his employers – in particular in terms of instrumental accompaniments: a number of solo instruments, using an ancestor of the clarinet and, in several cantatas (though not the ones here), very daring writing. Of course, as was the done thing in those days, the melodic forms closely follow the lyrics, using a principle of "musical painting" or "figuration" which Bach would often call upon. The Mannheimer Hofkapelle, conducted by Florian Heyerick, takes care to play using exactly the same period instruments, in the same arrangement, and in the same historical venues that Mannheim's orchestra would have used in days gone by. We eagerly await the next instalment! © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released August 28, 2009 | Berlin Classics

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Classical - Released October 10, 2006 | Groupe Analekta, Inc.

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Classical - Released May 13, 2008 | Analekta

Booklet
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Classical - Released February 17, 2004 | Groupe Analekta, Inc.