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Classical - Released August 23, 2019 | Bru Zane

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Mélodies (French) - Released June 22, 2018 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - 5 étoiles de Classica
Remembering Gounod as just a masterful composer of great French operas, it’s easy to forget that he also wrote, among many various pieces of work, close to one hundred and fifty melodies throughout is long and rich career. Surprisingly, almost one third of these pages were written in English (during his years in London, between 1870 and 1874), about fifteen of them are in Italian, as well as a few in Spanish and German. Most of them of course are in French, among which Tassis Christoyannis and Jeff Cohen selected twenty-four gems, a comprehensive array ranging from his very first published melody – his Où voulez-vous aller from 1839, the year of his Prix de Rome! – to his À une jeune Grecque of the utmost maturity, in 1884. The composer explored all of the styles he held dear, with all the eclecticism he’s famous for: French romanticism, German Lied, orientalism, old-fashioned archaic writing… Gounod was particularly sensitive to the words’ meaning as much as their sound, the back and forth of verses and the variety of periods, and excelled in finding a melodic movement to perfectly fit the inflexions of pronunciation, the expressive flow of speech and setting the perfect phrasing for an eloquent result. With him, unlike his illustrious elder Berlioz, music served the words, carried them and elevated them if possible. Let’s discover this beautiful pearl rosary, made of works we would love to hear in recital more often. © SM/Qobuz
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Quartets - Released April 20, 2018 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica
On the occasion of the bicentenary of Charles Gounod’s birth, this first complete string quartet (including two unpublished ones) on period instruments reveals an unknown part of his production, dominated by vocal music. Composer of the very end of the 19th century, Gounod and his five quartets are the worthy heir of the Viennese classicism tradition. The lyrical accents of the Quartet in G minor or the airy lightness of the Scherzo of the Petit Quatuor evoke nothing less than the names of Schubert and Mendelssohn. The musicians of the Quatuor Cambini-Paris (Julien Chauvin, Karine Crocquenoy, Pierre-Éric Nimylowycz and Atsushi Sakaï) gracefully reproduce these pages, full of gravity and sweetness. © Aparté/Little Tribeca
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Classical - Released March 29, 2019 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
After winning the Prix de Rome for his cantata Fernand in 1839 and spending two years in Rome, Gounod should have gone on to study in Germany, but he managed in 1842 to persuade the authorities that he should remain in Rome to work on a symphony. In 1843 he visited Mendelssohn who (while trying to dissuade him from wasting his time on Goethe’s Faust!) urged him to write another symphony. We do not know how much of the First Symphony Gounod had completed by then, but it is not surprising that Mendelssohn figures as one of the key influences on both symphonies. After performances of individual movements in 1855, premieres were given of the First on 4 March that year and of the Second on 13 February 1856. Yan Pascal Tortelier and his Iceland Symphony Orchestra demonstrate outstanding precision and musicality in these unjustly neglected works. © Chandos
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Full Operas - Released September 14, 2018 | Bru Zane

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica
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Sacred Vocal Music - Released January 15, 2018 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
It might be hard to believe that there could still exist a "discographic world first" when it came to the works of Gounod, and harder still to imagine that it could be such a substantial piece as this. And yet… Saint François d’Assise, a little oratorio in two parts first performed in 1891, has remained obscure up until now, to the point that its very existence has proved something of a surprise. And then all of a sudden, in 1996, the manuscript came back to light quite by accident: and here is its first recording, although several recordings had been made since its rediscovery. Gounod's last oratorio, of rather more modest proportions than Rédemption or Mors et Vita, with its great unity and flavoursome, carefully-tailored archaisms, conjures up both Franciscan austerity and that fullness of sound for which Gounod had such a knack. According to the composer himself: "I wanted the first of the two tableaux to be a musical translation of that beautiful tableau by Murillo showing Christ on the cross leaning over to St. Francis and putting his arm around his neck. The second tableau would be a translation of that fine work by Giotto, The Death of St Francis, surrounded by his brothers. " Let the listener be guided by his own lights. The album is rounded off with Hymne à Sainte Cécile, also by Gounod, and then Légende de Sainte Cécile by Liszt, written in 1874; and it should come of no surprise that the work is sung in French: it is, after all, the work's original language. © SM/Qobuz
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Sacred Vocal Music - Released March 3, 2011 | Mirare

Booklets Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording
This Requiem in C Major is Charles Gounod's last work, written in memory of one of his grandsons, who died in 1889. Feeling his strength diminishing, the old composer may also have written it with his own impending death in mind. As he was rehearsing for its first performance, Gounod was taken ill after singing the Benedictus in duet with his daughter. It is a luminous work, full of sweetness and peace, in a serene ambience which is close to that of the Requiem that Fauré had written a few years earlier. On this record, Michel Corboz uses Henri Büsser's adaptation for string quintet, harp and strings, for an intimate and interior feel, while deploying Gounod's melodic flights which were all his own, the fruit of a career writing many religious works. The author of adozen operas, he composed a good thirty masses, six requiems, oratorios, motets and cantatas. The Messe en sol mineur chorale sur l’intonation de la liturgie catholique in G Minor, first performed in 1888, is a substantial work, probably written after a meeting in Angers between Gounod and dom Joseph Pothier, the writer of a learned work dedicated to Gregorian melodies. Constructed on the basis of several liturgical themes, this Mass aims to unite Palestrinian purity with the radiant lyricism of Mozart, who was a second God to Gounod. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Opera - Released July 12, 2019 | Naxos

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The international success of after its premiere in 1859 completely overshadowed all of Gounod’s subsequent operas. He had known Goethe’s masterpiece for two decades and brought to the text his gifts for memorable melody and rich orchestration. Added to this, the plot of Faust’s ageing and the heroine Marguerite’s redemption, offered the opportunity for the most spectacular stage effects. Heard here in its 1864 London version with an additional air and without spoken dialogue or ballet, Faust represents 19th-century French opera at its peak. © Naxos
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Classical - Released January 1, 2016 | Orfeo

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Classical - Released March 6, 2020 | Rondeau

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Classical - Released September 18, 2012 | American Symphony Orchestra

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Classical - Released October 19, 2009 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 1998 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released August 20, 2009 | Warner Classics

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Cantatas (sacred) - Released January 12, 2018 | Ediciones Singulares

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 étoiles de Classica
An icon of French Romanticism thanks to the enduring popularity of his operas Faust and Roméo et Juliette, Charles Gounod competed three times for the prestigious Prix de Rome between 1837 and 1839. Thus he composed three unpublished cantatas for soloists and orchestra, including Marie Stuart et Rizzio and La Vendetta, which he never had the opportunity to hear in performance. Revealed for the first time, these three cantatas, fine examples of French Romanticism, show a young composer with a remarkable flair for opera. In the end Fernand won him the coveted prize, carrying with it the privilege of a three-year stay (from 1840) at the Villa Medici in Rome. While there he produced several sacred compositions, which have also remained unknown until now. His splendid Messe vocale for unaccompanied choir, written in a neo-Palestrinian style, deserves a place on the programme of every vocal ensemble. © Palazzetto Bru Zane
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Classical - Released July 24, 2020 | TACET Musikproduktion

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