Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released June 5, 2020 | Seattle Symphony Media

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month
What an album from Thomas Dausgaard! The Danish conductor is at ease in the Nordic repertoire and took on Sibelius’ Kullervo (Hyperion) following Paavo Berglund’s world-premiere performance in Bournemouth in 1970. He now continues as Music Director for the Seattle Symphony Orchestra with the second instalment of their recordings of all of Nielsen’s Symphonies, featuring Symphonies 1 & 2.His conducting is remarkably lively and fluid here and is mindful of the rhythm as well as the peculiarities of the instrumentation, which is filled with combinations of unusual timbres. Indeed, Symphony No. 2 (1901-1902, the same time as Sibelius’ Symphony No. 2) also hints at what was to come in Nielsen’s later work, especially through its woodwind arrangements.In this delicate score, Thomas Dausgaard characterises the four temperaments depicted in the movement with astonishing finesse; opening with the Collerico  (Choleric), an energetic allegro, followed by the delightful Comodo e Flemmatico (Phlegmatic), almost nonchalant temperament. The third is an energetic andante that evokes Bruckner’s choral works with dark brass creating the Malincolico (Melancholic) mood. Finally comes a more hesitant tone in the Sanguineo (Sanguine), a skilful mix between the initial collerico and the middle malincolico, with dynamic strings and brassy outbursts.Symphony No. 1 (Op. 7, FS 16, 1892, the same year that Kullervo was premiered) is transformed under the baton of Thomas Dausgaard into an exciting orchestral study that transcends the young Nielsen’s many influences in a veritable burst of creativity. From the very first opus, Thomas Dausgaard offers the listener a glimpse down the radically different path that Nielsen would go down compared with his Finnish counterpart Sibelius, (whom he deeply admired, as evidenced by the letters they exchanged!) and their very different relationship with tradition. An interpretation with much more acuity than many others. A must-listen. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Symphonies - Released May 5, 2015 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released February 3, 2015 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The second installment in Sakari Oramo's superb hybrid SACD cycle of the symphonies of Carl Nielsen on BIS presents the Symphony No. 1 in G minor and the Symphony No. 3, "Sinfonia espansiva," two ruggedly independent works that reflect the composer's late Romantic style yet point to the modernism to come. While the Symphony No. 1 was influenced by Brahms and offers a rich harmonic language, propulsive rhythms, and a fairly homogenous orchestral palette, the Symphony No. 3 is striking for its reliance on unfolding counterpoint and long-breathed lines, and most notable for the use of wordless parts for soprano and baritone voices in the pastoral slow movement. These performances by Oramo and the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra are exceptional for their stunning power and spacious feeling, though the crisp details and focused sound quality will be the biggest draw for audiophiles. This package on BIS follows Oramo's 2014 release of the Symphony No. 4, "The Inextinguishable," and the Symphony No. 5, Nielsen's most popular symphonies, and the extraordinary quality of these recordings gives high hopes for the conclusion of the series. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$18.49
CD$12.49

Symphonic Music - Released March 9, 2015 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released February 4, 2014 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet
Sakari Oramo's hybrid SACD of Carl Nielsen's most popular symphonies, the Symphony No. 4, "The Inextinguishable," and the Symphony No. 5, is a sonic showcase of works that ordinarily aren't treated as display pieces. Nielsen's scoring is clean and precise, and his handling of the orchestra is distinctive and often brilliant, so it's only natural that Oramo would take full advantage of the resources of the superb Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra and BIS' state-of-the-art technology to present these symphonies with optimal sound quality. However, while listeners will be amazed by the incredible tone colors and the fantastic separation of parts in these recordings, they should still appreciate the symphonies for the strength of their ideas and the rigor of their development: these are serious essays that must be regarded among the greatest of symphonies. Nielsen's organic structures are strikingly clear in Oramo's interpretations, and there isn't any of the murkiness that attends other performances that strive for atmospheric effects. Oramo instead understands that the counterpoint reveals all, and as long as all the lines are heard clearly, as they are here, the symphonies unfold their themes logically and inevitably, revealing themselves as cogent essays in the tradition of Beethoven and Brahms, albeit with a Nordic flavor. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$22.49
CD$14.99

Chamber Music - Released September 3, 2013 | Dacapo

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released November 10, 2017 | Seattle Symphony Media

Hi-Res Booklet
This version of Danish composer Carl Nielsen’s Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4 were recorded live by the Seattle Symphony under the direction of its “first guest conductor” and also Danish, Thomas Dausgaard – who from the 2019-20 season will become its Music Director. Symphony No. 3 − “Sinfonia Espansiva” − written in 1910, is unique for having wordless vocal parts sung by a soprano and a bass in the second movement (who can be replaced by a clarinet and a trombone if necessary); interestingly this rather sinister Andante pastorale − already evocative of Shostakovich − was played at the composer’s funeral in 1931. The Symphony conveys a ferocious energy, expansive in the first movement that gave its name to the work, restrained in slower movements, and rather solemn and festive throughout the rest. Symphony No. 4, composed in 1915 and called “The Inextinguishable”, is also packed with energy, chaotic at times, and sometimes more channelled in the joy or magnitude of the gesture, with an orchestration of great originality. It’s a shame Nielsen isn’t featured more often on the programmes of French orchestras. © SM/Qobuz
From
CD$9.99

Concertos - Released November 18, 2008 | Chandos

Booklet
Carl Nielsen composed extensive incidental music for a 1919 Copenhagen production of a play, Aladdin, or the Wonderful Lamp. The lavish original production stretched to such a length that it had to be presented on two evenings, and the composer contributed 80 minutes of music scored for full orchestra, chorus, and vocal soloists. The director cut and rearranged the music to the extent that Nielsen disavowed responsibility for the production, but later went on to arrange the music for concert presentation, and in this form it has remained popular particularly with Danish audiences. Nielsen was a master of writing for the theater, and the music for Aladdin is colorful and varied in its moods and styles. It's tinged with a mild Middle Eastern exoticism, and Nielsen consciously evokes the simplicity of folk traditions in some sections. Many of the set pieces were intended for moments of stage spectacle -- processions, dances, and celebrations -- and give the composer the opportunity to let his imagination run free, and there are many occasions of sweeping Romantic passion. While the score doesn't represent Nielsen's most profound or original musical thought, it's an entirely attractive piece. Aladdin's length and requirements for large musical forces make performances of the complete score relatively rare, so this lively, evocative, and musically nuanced performance with the Danish National Symphony and Chamber Choir D/R, led by Gennady Rozhdestvensky, make an ideal introduction to the work. Chandos' sound is clean, and captures a good balance between warmth and clarity. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$11.99
CD$10.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1963 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res
From
CD$14.99

Opera - Released November 1, 1990 | Chandos

Booklet
From
HI-RES$29.99
CD$19.99

Classical - Released June 30, 2015 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
Recorded with the BBC Philharmonic between 2012 and 2015, John Storgårds' box set of the six symphonies of Carl Nielsen follows his 2014 Sibelius cycle on the same label, and he maintains the same high standards of interpretation and performance that made the previous set worthwhile. Storgårds conducts Nielsen's symphonies with an emphasis on their intellectual rigor, muscular counterpoint, and rugged orchestration, so for the most part he eschews lushness and rich tone colors and opts instead for lean textures and crisp articulation, which are essential to Nielsen's sound. Yet these performances are surprisingly vibrant and colorful, and quite appealing for their clarity and distinct separation of parts, while the reproduction gives the musicians a sense of space and presence. However, listeners who have grown accustomed to Chandos' superb audiophile recordings will be disappointed that these are standard stereo CDs, and as good as they sound, they would have been incredible in the multichannel format. As it stands, Storgårds' cycle faces direct competition from Alan Gilbert's hybrid SACD set with the New York Philharmonic, so with comparable approaches and rather similar musical results, this package's clearest advantage is its affordability. © TiVo
From
CD$10.49

Classical - Released September 1, 1988 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Classical - Released March 3, 2017 | Signum Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
Unlike his more conventionally melodic Violin Concerto of 1911, Carl Nielsen's Flute Concerto and his Clarinet Concerto reflect his coming to terms with modernism in the 1920s, and share similar expressions of unease and instability with his Symphony No. 5 and the Symphony No. 6, "Sinfonia Semplice," which were composed in the same decade. Nielsen wrote the Flute Concerto in 1926 for Holger Gilbert-Jespersen and the Clarinet Concerto in 1928 for Aage Oxenvad, both members of the Copenhagen Wind Quintet, an ensemble Nielsen especially admired for its beautiful tone. Yet the music in each work is quite demanding, with solo parts that often play up technical difficulties over lyricism, and the orchestra provides contentious accompaniment, at times threatening to overwhelm the soloists with aggressive outbursts and sniping commentary. For this 2017 album on Signum Classics, flutist Samuel Coles and clarinetist Mark Van de Wiel are joined by Paavo Järvi and the Philharmonia Orchestra in vivid renditions of both concertos, and the exotic Aladdin Suite is provided as filler. While the sound of the recording is exceptional for a standard CD, it's unfortunate that a multichannel version wasn't issued, because the soloists are spectacular in the concertos, and the Philharmonia plays in top form, with clean separation of parts, remarkable depth, and wonderfully rich tone colors. Recommended for any newcomers to Nielsen's music. © TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Classical - Released September 10, 2007 | Warner Classics

While not for everyone -- those who think modernist music should be painful and pessimistic need not apply -- this disc coupling Carl Nielsen's Flute Concerto and Clarinet Concerto along with his Wind Quintet will appeal to fans of the Danish composer's unique brand of optimistic modernism. As superlatively played by flutist Emmanuel Pahud and clarinetist Sabine Meyer with Simon Rattle and the Berliner Philharmoniker in the concertos and with three principals from the orchestra in the quintet, these performances are light, lyrical, and lovely with sprightly tempos, radiant textures, and an unbeatable feeling for ensemble. Faced with competition from nearly every great flutist of the last 50 years, Pahud makes the Flute Concerto very much his own with his warm tone, sparkling technique, and cogent interpretation. Meyer, surely one of the great clarinetists of the last 50 years, plays the Clarinet Concerto with an elegant tone, an effortless technique, and the kind of artless control that makes her performances absolutely irresistible. With the ever-alert Rattle and the always superb Berlin Orchestra, Pahud and Meyer turn in extraordinary performances of the concertos. And with bassoonist Stefan Schweigert, oboist Jonathan Kelly, and hornist Radek Baborák, Pahud and Meyer together turn in a jovial performance of the quintet. EMI's digital sound is clear, warm, and detailed. © TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Classical - Released November 1, 1989 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

From
CD$12.99

Classical - Released August 1, 1990 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

From
CD$50.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

From
CD$9.99

Chamber Music - Released April 7, 2015 | BIS

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
From
CD$9.99

Full Operas - Released April 28, 2008 | Chandos

Carl Nielsen composed extensive incidental music for a 1919 Copenhagen production of a play, Aladdin, or the Wonderful Lamp. The lavish original production stretched to such a length that it had to be presented on two evenings, and the composer contributed 80 minutes of music scored for full orchestra, chorus, and vocal soloists. The director cut and rearranged the music to the extent that Nielsen disavowed responsibility for the production, but later went on to arrange the music for concert presentation, and in this form it has remained popular particularly with Danish audiences. Nielsen was a master of writing for the theater, and the music for Aladdin is colorful and varied in its moods and styles. It's tinged with a mild Middle Eastern exoticism, and Nielsen consciously evokes the simplicity of folk traditions in some sections. Many of the set pieces were intended for moments of stage spectacle -- processions, dances, and celebrations -- and give the composer the opportunity to let his imagination run free, and there are many occasions of sweeping Romantic passion. While the score doesn't represent Nielsen's most profound or original musical thought, it's an entirely attractive piece. Aladdin's length and requirements for large musical forces make performances of the complete score relatively rare, so this lively, evocative, and musically nuanced performance with the Danish National Symphony and Chamber Choir D/R, led by Gennady Rozhdestvensky, make an ideal introduction to the work. Chandos' sound is clean, and captures a good balance between warmth and clarity. © TiVo