Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Violin Concertos - Released April 13, 2018 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month - Exceptional Sound Recording - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - 5 étoiles de Classica
Today, Finland is one of the richest musical countries on Earth. Thanks to the exceptional quality of its musical teaching it produces numerous composers, conductors and artists who perform all over the world. The very rich catalogue of the dynamic Finnish publisher Ondine contains several recordings of the German violinist Christian Tetzlaff (Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin) by Bach, Mozart's sonatas, Trios by Brahms, concertos by Mendelssohn, Schumann and Shostakovich); and the Finnish conductor Hannu Lintu (Sibelius, Mahler, Enescu, Berio, Messiaen, Lindberg, Melartin), but it is their first record together. Bartók's two Violin Concertos were written thirty years apart, for two virtuosos. While the Second Concerto in the form of variations on a theme that develop ingeniously across three movements, has been well-known for a long time, the first remained unheard for years. Written as a declaration of love for the Hungarian-Swiss violinist Stefi Geyer, for whom Bartók had fallen, it was a secret kept by the dedicatee: it was only long after the composer's death that the violinist let Bartók's patron and close friend, the conductor Paul Sacher, know about the work. He would see that it was performed, with Hansheinz Schneeberger, but only in 1958. Bartók's two concertos, essential parts of the repertoire for violin and orchestra would enjoy a well-deserved resurgence in interest among a younger generation of violinists – the recording of the same works by Renaud Capuçon for Warner came out a few weeks ago. This new version, magnificently recorded, carefully explores all the orchestral richness, in perfect dialogue with Christian Tetzlaff's outstanding violin. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released September 28, 2010 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording - Hi-Res Audio
Written over a span of nearly 20 years, Bartók's three piano concertos were composed not at the behest of other performers as the violin and viola concertos were, but for the composer himself. Much like the virtuoso composer/performers of earlier generations, Bartók composed his three monumental concertos to take on concert tours and, of course, to generate income. Each of the concertos closely adheres to the Classical three-movement structure exemplified by Beethoven, even concluding each work with a rondo movement. The motivic development, use of modes, and incorporation of other musical forms is all Bartók's own. This Chandos album of the three Bartók concertos features pianist Jean-Efflam Bavouzet who completed an immensely successful complete survey of the Debussy complete solo piano works. Though Debussy and Bartók are stylistically quite different, the attributes that so distinguished his Debussy performances -- broad range of colors, meticulously controlled touch, transparent articulation, effortless control of tempo -- make for brilliant Bartók as well. Accompanied by the BBC Philharmonic under Gianandrea Noseda, Bartók's muscular orchestral writing and continuous dialogue (or arguments, as the case may be) between soloist and orchestra are seamless and cohesive. Even during the most brash, forceful brass fanfares, Noseda maintains a keen sense of balance that always allows Bavouzet's powerful sound to ring through. Conversely, the intimate, hushed sound quality achieved in the Second Concerto's Adagio is enough to make listeners want to hold their breath. After listening to such satisfying performances, listeners will be left hoping that Chandos has more plans for Bavouzet and Bartók. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Violin Concertos - Released August 24, 2010 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Though he was not himself a violinist, Béla Bartók managed to compose two incredible violin concertos, the second of which is considered by some to be the most important violin concerto of the 20th century. The first concerto was written for the unrequited love of his youth, violinist Stefi Geyer, who never performed the work publicly and kept hold of the manuscript until her death in 1956. The two-movement work is filled with references to Bartók's relationship with her; the first movement luxuriously romantic and the second a pyrotechnic display of sheer virtuosity. The Second Concerto came about nearly two decades later from a commission. Though the work is in a Classical three-movement format, the inner workings are a mesmerizing series of motivic variations entirely of Bartók's design. Performing on this PentaTone Classics album are violinist Arabella Steinbacher and the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande under Marek Janowski. Steinbacher continues in her recent trend of producing exemplary recordings and joining forces with equally refined orchestras. Both concertos are executed with virtually flawless technical accuracy: polished intonation, precise rhythm and articulation, and a right arm that equally creates long, flowing lines and aggressive, forceful accents. Steinbacher's connection with the score is clear as she guides listeners through the emotions of the First Concerto and the ingenious variations of the Second. Janowski leads his orchestra in a sensitive yet robust accompaniment, and PentaTone's sound is rich, full, and clear. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$15.49
CD$10.99

Classical - Released November 27, 2020 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet
Even in the context of it no longer being unusual to present Bartók's string quartets as firmly classical works, rather than majoring on their Hungarian folk echoes, the Jerusalem Quartet's Bartók's is still striking for its sheer polish and beauty of tone. We heard it with the first installment of their cycle, covering numbers 2, 4 and 6. Now we have it again with numbers 1, 3 and 5. The beauty doesn't come at the expense of drama or momentum, either. Thinking of momentum in particular, Quartet No. 1's final Allegro vivace is bristling with it, although it's perhaps other qualities that leap most to the fore across this ravishing reading. Written in 1909 as a farewell to the violinist Stefi Geyer, for whom Bartók had long nursed a painful, unrequited love, this work is a melding of his late Romantic, Germanic or Austro-Hungarian early background, with the new influences of Debussy and folk music, and here the melding of all this is often sublime. For instance drop in at at 2'15” and 8'37” in the final movement for ecstatic climaxes which, to the already intoxicating wholetone harmonies and pentatonic scales, these four bring a luminosity of tone and sumptuously wide sound that brings shimmering Debussy orchestral scores to mind. Or for an example of the Viennese elegance with which they've dealt with the Hungarian folk echoes, head to the violin double-stops preceding that second climax (from 7'00” onwards) which are all the more effective for the Jerusalem not having taken the overt gypsy shindig route. On to 1927 for the Third Quartet - and Bartók's later, more concentrated and abstract style - and under the Jerusalem's fingertips its succession of special string effects are bringing fresh sonic treats at every twist and turn: eerily beautiful sul ponticello passages; glissandi despatched with both firm control and fluid flexibility; a fabulous depth of tone when the score (often) demands; razer-sharp definition to the lines, whether over homophony or contrapuntal interweavings. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released September 13, 2019 | Orfeo

Hi-Res Distinctions Diapason d'or
From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Classical - Released February 26, 2021 | PM Classics Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
The violence and horror depicted in Bartók’s Miraculous Mandarin channel the events of the collapse of the first Hungarian Soviet Republic and the Red and White Terrors of 1919-1921 that followed. The inscrutable Mandarin falls into a trap set up by a gang of bloodthirsty thugs with tragic results and an ultimately touching conclusion. The Second Suite of 1909, conceived as a Serenade for small orchestra, is on a smaller scale than the First Suite. The Hungarian Peasant Songs date from the period of the Great War. Originally a set of short piano pieces, Bartók orchestrated nine of the movements in 1933, eight of which are recorded here. © Onyx Classics
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Symphonic Music - Released May 18, 2018 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
What an excellent idea it was to put the Concertos for Orchestra by two friends as close as Bartók and Kodály together on a single record! The first, written for Koussevitzky and the Boston Orchestra, has been a hit for over 70 years in programmes and concerts the world over; but the second has, quite unjustly, been conspicuous in its absence since its first performance in 1941. The fruit of a commission from the Chicago Philharmonic Orchestra in 1939, the Concerto for Orchestra by Kodály was supposed to have been first performed by the writer in person, but the plan was scotched by the war, which prevented Kodály from leaving his country. The score arrived in the US in the luggage of... Bartók, who carefully packed it up when he began his exile. Short, and made up of a single movement, Kodály's work doesn't bear the mark of the political events of the time. It is a work in a rather pastoral mood, in which elements of baroque concerto grosso are mixed in with traditional popular melodies. The very delicate orchestration almost overshadows the massed ranks of the orchestra demanded by the composer, who would shortly leave behind symphonic composition to write his famous Psalmus Hungaricus and oratorios, before one final Symphony put the capstone on his oeuvre. Jakub Hrůša does perfect justice to this seductive score, painting it in diaphanous colours and a most convincing mystery, at the head of the excellent Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra. The young Czech conductor doesn't stop at merely putting these two works on the same record, but works to underline the subterranean links that join them together. His approach to the Concerto for Orchestra by Bartók, which came a few years after Kodály's piece is the opposite of the monumental orchestral work that we normally hear. This renewed version expresses a piercing melancholy which even the thundering of the final Presto can't dissipate. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | Sony Music Labels Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Ballets - Released June 7, 2019 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
From
CD$25.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Daring in virtuosity, vigorous in interpretation, and spellbinding in effect, the Takács Quartet has recorded one of the truly great sets of Bartók's monumental String Quartets (6), seldom matched and surely never surpassed. In hearing this stellar ensemble play, one is struck not so much by Bartók's unusual musical details or his myriad technical devices -- the quartets are practically a bible of advanced string techniques -- but instead, the listener is treated to "big-picture" interpretations that emphasize the shape of the movements and their relations to each other as coherent musical structures. The Takács Quartet's overarching, holistic interpretations are aided by the set's division: disc one features the odd-numbered quartets, and the even-numbered works are on disc two, so the awkward break between movements that normally results from a sequential arrangement is avoided. With explosive energy, genuine Hungarian passion, and astonishing propulsion, the musicians also play with an ear to intelligibility, and manage to make even the thorniest and densest of the quartets -- Nos. 3 and 4 -- sound utterly natural, transparently structured, and deeply communicative. London's exceptional reproduction captures the ensemble with delicious resonance; while this takes some of the bite off the harshest dissonances, it adds a perceptible luster to Bartók's palette and is preferable to the aridity of some recordings. © TiVo
From
CD$14.99

Quartets - Released October 5, 2018 | Chandos

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 étoiles de Classica
For its very first recording on Chandos, the Arcadia String Quartet presents what has been at the very heart of its musical career and influences: the complete string quartets by Bartók. With the music of the Hungarian composer, the members of this Romanian ensemble, neighbours of his birthplace, have won such major careershaping competitions as Osaka, the Wigmore Hall, and Hamburg. Bartók’s attachment to the string quartet – as to no other genre – was to the keystone of the Viennese tradition, but with the aim of moving the medium out of its native city a little, into the countryside of alternative tonalities and rhythms. The six mature works he wrote are being revealed here with all the singular patterns, mixed modalities, bitterness, lamentations, and, at times, bright folk influences which they contain. © Chandos
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Opera - Released March 19, 2021 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet
Composed in 1911, Bluebeard’s Castle is Béla Bartók’s only opera – a radical masterpiece which has secured a place alongside the other innovative music dramas of the same period, from Debussy’s Pelléas et Mélisande to Berg’s Wozzeck. Planning to write a one-act opera, Bartók settled on a libretto by Béla Balázs with the kind of surreal and/or macabre themes that would soon feature in his two ballets, The Wooden Prince and The Miraculous Mandarin. The main source for the libretto text was a play by Maeterlinck, a retelling of Perrault’s gruesome tale of Barbe-Bleue, the sinister yet strangely seductive wife-killer. Balázs turned the drama into what he called a ‘mystery play’, however, and his stylisation of the story throws the weight of the drama onto stage-setting and music. The single act centres on the successive opening of the castle’s seven doors, and Bartók’s music brings across the horrors of the blood-drenched torture chamber, the steely power of the armoury and the glitter of jewels in the treasury as well as the interplay of increasingly feverish questionings from Judit and defiant responses from Bluebeard. Susanna Mälkki and the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra have already proved their Bartók credentials with a recording of his ballet scores which was chosen as "Record of the Week" in BBC Radio 3 Record Review and earned top marks in "Diapason" and on the website "Klassik-Heute". Joined by Mika Kares as Duke Bluebeard and his Judit, the Hungarian mezzo-soprano Szilvia Vörös, the team here performs Bartók’s darkly glittering, shimmering and threatening score in a live recording from 2020. © BIS Records
From
CD$9.99

Classical - Released July 15, 2014 | Hungaroton

When this disc's many fine aspects are considered -- the intelligent selection of works, the conductor's communicative skills, the virtuosity and sensitivity of the orchestra, and the high quality of the recording -- it may be judged an impressive achievement on all counts. The all-Bartók program is balanced, with superb pieces reflecting different directions the composer pursued over three decades. The monumental and heroic Concerto for Orchestra (1943) is handsomely contrasted by the exquisite Dance Suite (1923) and the charming and robust Hungarian Peasant Songs (1933). Zoltán Kocsis shows great comprehension and feeling for Bartók's work in its various phases, and he communicates his deep understanding to the orchestra with directness and economy. While his dynamic interpretations may be too pugnacious or overpowering for some tastes, Kocsis nevertheless shapes all three works with coherence, conviction, and expressive power, and his results are persuasive. The Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra is flawless in execution, nuanced in timbre, vigorous in attack, and, best of all, utterly spontaneous in response to Kocsis' supple beat. Listeners may enjoy the full benefits of the hybrid SACD sound, which is especially good at capturing the myriad solos in the concerto and the exotic filigree of the Dance Suite. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Classical - Released September 25, 2020 | Claves Records

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$14.49
CD$10.49

Solo Piano - Released October 5, 2018 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Violin Concertos - Released September 6, 2011 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Classical - Released October 21, 2019 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$26.49
CD$18.99

Classical - Released June 9, 2017 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
From
CD$8.99

Classical - Released August 29, 2006 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique
Some piano music is meant to be listened to, some piano music is meant to be played, and some piano music is meant to be listened to and played. Beethoven's piano sonatas are meant to be listened to -- and, for a few very talented pianists, to be played. Bach's Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach is meant to be played -- and, by piano teachers and kindhearted listeners, to be listened to. Brahms' late Klavierstücke are meant to be played and listened to -- provided the amateur pianist is good enough and his or her friends are indulgent enough. Bartók's Mikrokosmos are meant to be played -- and, every once and a while, to be listened to. They are, after all, the quintessential pedagogic pieces: 122 works arranged in order of difficulty over six books meant to engage, entertain, enlighten, and ultimately educate the budding pianist -- and no more meant to be listened to from end to end than Clementi's Gradus ad Parnassum. That doesn't mean there aren't beautiful and beguiling pieces inside the Mikrokosmos, there assuredly are, but it does mean that sitting down to listen straight through to 147 minutes and 37 seconds of Mikrokosmos is more than most people should be asked to do. That said, Jenö Jandó 2005 recording of Mikrokosmos is eminently listenable. Jandó is the Hungarian pianist and Naxos recording artist who has recorded vast swathes of the standard piano repertoire, but his heart remains in his home country of Bartóksylvania and his performances here are wholly idiomatic and totally sympathetic. Naturally, Jandó can play the notes -- anyone who can play Beethoven's piano sonatas can play Bartók's Mikrokosmos -- what is truly impressive is that he can find the music in the notes and express the art in the exercises. Although the argument could be made that the best way to listen to Mikrokosmos is to play Mikrokosmos, for those looking only to listen, Jandó's two-disc set is the inexpensive way to go. Naxos' sound is deep, but it could be clearer. © TiVo