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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released April 23, 2021 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released November 6, 2020 | Ondine

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Recorded in Riga’s huge Protestant cathedral in March 2020, this amazing album perfectly translates the generous slow tempo-inducing acoustics which go wonderfully with Anton Bruckner’s passionate Motets. His sacred works are less well-known than his symphonies (which are in fact an extension of the scared works) though they make up a large part of the Austrian composer and organist’s opuses. His spirituality is echoed by the religious music composed and celebrated today in Latvia and other Baltic countries. Leading the Latvian Radio Choir, Sigvards Kļava paints a timeless picture of Bruckner whose music seems to float in the air thanks to the voices’ perfect homogeneity. The Mass in D minor (without Gloria or Credo as was the tradition at the time) is set amidst a selection of motets. This “missa brevis” is the work of a young 19-year-old man who was largely influenced by Palestrina. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Symphonic Music - Released May 5, 2017 | PentaTone

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Classical - Released October 23, 2020 | Phi

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Composed in 1866 for the inauguration of a votive chapel in Linz Cathedral, Anton Bruckner’s Mass No. 2 is a fine example of modernity blended with a centuries-old religious tradition, in that wind instruments are set in dialogue with choral writing inspired by Gregorian chant. Shorter in duration but scored for chorus and large orchestra with four soloists, his Te Deum of 1881 was acclaimed by such illustrious contemporaries as Hans Richter and Mahler, while the composer, usually very self-critical, opined that the score of this work would make God ‘judge him kindly’. Like the eminent interpreter of the sacred repertory he is, Philippe Herreweghe here conveys with great fervour his vision of these two major religious works of the second half of the nineteenth century. © Phi
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Classical - Released November 16, 2010 | PentaTone

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Classical - Released April 5, 2011 | PentaTone

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Marek Janowski's recordings of Anton Bruckner's symphonies for PentaTone are among the finest renditions available, and they are also among the best sounding SACD releases on this extraordinary label. Working with the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, Janowski presents the Symphony No. 7 in E major with stunning clarity, generous warmth, spacious dimensions, and profound feeling, and the orchestra responds with some of the best playing in its storied history, with technique and expression to match the conductor's exacting standards. Admirers of Bruckner's symphonies know how tricky they are to interpret, in light of the myriad versions and editions in existence and the differing opinions about the composer's intentions. Fortunately, the Seventh Symphony is one of the least controversial, and the Nowak edition Janowski uses is frequently recorded, so it is familiar to fans. (Note for purists: this performance includes the unauthorized cymbal crash at the Adagio's climax, which is the only point of contention in this recording.) Since there is no special case to be made for the symphony's edition, all that's necessary is to listen to the magnificent playing and to take in the majestic pacing of this symphony, which is one of Bruckner's most popular works. Because Janowski and the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande have had great successes with this and the last two Bruckner symphonies, listeners in search of great performances should give them a try, and audiophiles should regard them as required listening. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | PentaTone

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Marek Janowski's 2007 recording of Anton Bruckner's unfinished Symphony No. 9 in D minor with the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande is quite possibly the best sounding of any recording ever made of this work, and the hybrid multichannel SACD format gives it every possible advantage. From the soft, somber fanfares that open the first movement to the radiant major chord that closes the Adagio, Janowski draws a well-rounded and burnished tone from this exceptional orchestra that is exactly what one wants in Bruckner, even in this grave and austere symphony. Surprisingly, the orchestra under Janowski delivers something very close to a weighty German sound, despite its reputation for having a lighter French quality under its founding conductor, Ernest Ansermet. All of the monumental climaxes, ponderous cadences, and heroic perorations are played with maximum force, yet the Suisse Romande demonstrates that it can turn on a dime and play with a gentle Viennese lilt in the lyrical episodes. The direct stream digital recording captures this magnificent playing with wonderful fidelity, but what makes this truly remarkable is its extremely wide dynamic range, which allows even the faintest diminuendos and the most distant effects to be heard absolutely clearly without artificial boosting. Since one's attention can drift in these quiet passages, it's good that Janowski keeps up the intense focus of the playing and makes the details clear enough to follow. So with the astute direction of the conductor, the brilliant musicianship of the orchestra, and the splendid engineering of PentaTone, this fabulous recording deserves the highest marks, and all Brucknerians should hear it as soon as possible. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Kings College Cambridge

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Bruckner's Mass No. 2 in E minor, WAB 27, was composed for mixed chorus, not for an English cathedral choir with boy sopranos, and listeners will make up their own minds about this departure from tradition. It's interesting that the late Choir of King's College, Cambridge, director Stephen Cleobury chose this work for his final recording with the choir: it's far from the group's usual wheelhouse, or his own, yet one can understand his motivations. The work is a real challenge for the singers, with long stretches of polyphony blooming into moments of radiant faith. Sample the Credo and listen to the glorious Resurrexit, and the appeal of Cleobury's approach becomes clear. The young singers do everything that's asked of them, and in its way, this is a virtuoso performance. In the short motets that make up the balance of the program, the ages of the singers are less of an issue, and the performances have the feel of a group that revels in its own space. The Locus iste is memorable in its soaring quality. Ultimately listener reactions here will depend on how they feel about the extension of boy singers into this repertory, but the album makes a fine swan song for Cleobury's always progressive and remarkable career. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | MUNCHNER PHILHARMONIKER GBR

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Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | MUNCHNER PHILHARMONIKER GBR

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Classical - Released August 7, 2012 | PentaTone

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For this 2011 recording of Anton Bruckner's Symphony No. 3, Marek Janowski and the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande perform the 1889 revision, edited by Leopold Nowak. Considering the rush of younger conductors to record the original 1873 version (as a part of a growing movement to restore Bruckner's first versions as the most authoritative), Janowski is clearly bucking the trend by playing the most familiar edition that for decades had been accepted as standard by nearly all serious Brucknerians. Leaner and compact, the 1889 version is shorn of the original's Wagner quotations, shortened by several minutes, and argued more confidently and coherently; with Janowski's assertive interpretation, the music makes a strong case for Bruckner's pruning. Janowski clearly values efficiency, and his control of the symphony's shape and overall trajectory make it purposeful and even urgent, a far cry from the meandering readings that tend to make the original version seem indulgent and unnecessarily padded. PentaTone's extraordinary recording gives the symphony a fantastic audiophile presentation, and the orchestra is rich in tone colors and deep in dimensions, thanks to clear separation of parts and the spacious multichannel sound. Highly recommended, and well worth hearing, no matter which state of the symphony one prefers. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 29, 2013 | PentaTone

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Symphonies - Released March 1, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | MUNCHNER PHILHARMONIKER GBR

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Classical - Released May 28, 2013 | PentaTone

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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | PentaTone

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Of Anton Bruckner's 11 symphonies, the perennially popular Symphony No. 7 in E major is his most consistently melodious, evenly paced, and lyrically flowing, with comparatively few false starts, awkward pauses, or tedious fanfares. For this exceptional hybrid SACD from PentaTone, Yakov Kreizberg and the Vienna Symphony deliver one of the smoothest and roundest performances of the symphony heard in years. Yet it might actually be too polished for the liking of some old-guard Bruckner fans, who may argue that the orchestra is too mellow, luscious, and soft, and that Kreizberg's inflections and phrases are too nuanced and sensual for the composer's pure, almost sacred, intentions. But more important than the undeniably rich tonal quality found here is the interpretation, which draws on the style of Wagner's most ardent music; some of the more ecstatic passages of Lohengrin and Tristan und Isolde may come to mind when one hears this disc. There is no reason why Bruckner's symphonies must always sound chaste, devotional, or like ponderously orchestrated organ music, for they are secular works by a passionate man who wished especially to be counted in the Wagner camp, and who would have relished hearing such an emotive account as this. It also helps to remember that Wagner's death inspired the slow movement of this work, and it should be taken as Bruckner's most heartfelt tribute to the Bayreuth master. Purists may let Kreizberg's recording pass by unheard, but anyone who wants to hear the symphony played with full-blown emotions and lush, late-Romantic timbres need look no further. The reproduction on this album is especially gorgeous and enjoyable, so in the unlikely event that the performance disappoints, the sound is still first-rate and sure to delight audiophiles. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | MUNCHNER PHILHARMONIKER GBR

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Classical - Released March 6, 2012 | PentaTone

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PentaTone's line of hybrid multichannel SACDs are among the finest recordings available, and audiophiles are regularly tempted by these offerings, even if the selections are not always the most familiar. This 2012 release of Anton Bruckner's Symphony No. 1 in C minor may not have the instant appeal of better known orchestral showpieces, such as Stravinsky's Le Sacre du printemps or Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade, but the music sounds remarkably colorful and nuanced in this subtle performance and must be counted as a sonic success. A seasoned Brucknerian, Marek Janowski previously has presented lucid interpretations of the Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth symphonies for PentaTone, and his output is impressive on both musical and technical levels. Trained in the German repertory, Janowski has a deep feeling for this overlooked symphony, and under his direction, the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande plays with particular zeal and convincing assurance. Yet Janowski is also aware that every note must come through, so he takes extraordinary pains to draw the most delicate distinctions and colors, even at the softest dynamics. While this isn't Bruckner's best-loved symphony, here it sounds like it should be better appreciated, and that's a sign of the craft and integrity that have gone into this first-rate recording. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 30, 2010 | PentaTone

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PentaTone's extraordinary hybrid multichannel super audio CDs are aimed at the connoisseur of the finest recordings. Marek Janowski's incomparable recording of Anton Bruckner's Symphony No. 5 in B flat major is at least equal to anything released by this prestigious label, and surely surpasses many. Leading the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, Janowski turns in a perfectly lucid and expressively spot-on reading of Bruckner's contrapuntal masterpiece, and inspires some of the finest playing in this work that has ever been recorded. The instrumental details are crisp, the counterpoint absolutely transparent, the orchestra has full sonic presence, the ambience is resonant but clean and unblurred, and the recording is as credibly realistic as what might be heard in the best seat in a concert hall. In short, this is the collector's and audiophile's go-to recording of Bruckner's Fifth, and it is difficult to find anyone who could find fault with it, short of an ardent defender of some other cherished recording. But it's probably impossible to find one to best this masterpiece of performance and recording, so further praise is superfluous. This album is recommended as one of the best releases of 2010. © TiVo