Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$14.99

Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$13.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released September 9, 2016 | Challenge Classics

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Symphonies - Released June 28, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$53.99
CD$48.49

Symphonies - Released January 1, 2016 | Universal Music Group International

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released November 6, 2020 | Ondine

Hi-Res Booklet
Recorded in Riga’s huge Protestant cathedral in March 2020, this amazing album perfectly translates the generous slow tempo-inducing acoustics which go wonderfully with Anton Bruckner’s passionate Motets. His sacred works are less well-known than his symphonies (which are in fact an extension of the scared works) though they make up a large part of the Austrian composer and organist’s opuses. His spirituality is echoed by the religious music composed and celebrated today in Latvia and other Baltic countries. Leading the Latvian Radio Choir, Sigvards Kļava paints a timeless picture of Bruckner whose music seems to float in the air thanks to the voices’ perfect homogeneity. The Mass in D minor (without Gloria or Credo as was the tradition at the time) is set amidst a selection of motets. This “missa brevis” is the work of a young 19-year-old man who was largely influenced by Palestrina. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Symphonic Music - Released May 5, 2017 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released October 23, 2020 | Phi

Hi-Res Booklet
Composed in 1866 for the inauguration of a votive chapel in Linz Cathedral, Anton Bruckner’s Mass No. 2 is a fine example of modernity blended with a centuries-old religious tradition, in that wind instruments are set in dialogue with choral writing inspired by Gregorian chant. Shorter in duration but scored for chorus and large orchestra with four soloists, his Te Deum of 1881 was acclaimed by such illustrious contemporaries as Hans Richter and Mahler, while the composer, usually very self-critical, opined that the score of this work would make God ‘judge him kindly’. Like the eminent interpreter of the sacred repertory he is, Philippe Herreweghe here conveys with great fervour his vision of these two major religious works of the second half of the nineteenth century. © Phi
From
CD$9.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2016 | Orfeo

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Classical - Released August 23, 2019 | Reference Recordings

Hi-Res Booklet
In 2019, Manfred Honeck and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra released their second Bruckner recording as a hybrid SACD on Reference Recordings, a powerful interpretation of the unfinished Symphony No. 9 in D minor that shows these musicians' remarkable affinity for the composer. In choosing the unfinished, three-movement version of the work, thereby avoiding any controversy over the various completions of Bruckner's intended finale, Honeck adheres to the long-established 1951 edition by Leopold Nowak, so there are no textual surprises. What is somewhat unexpected for a performance of the Ninth is Honeck's careful analysis of the material Bruckner incorporated, such as the "Miserere" from the "Gloria" of his Mass in D minor, the "Annunciation of Death" motive from the Eighth Symphony, and references to the Latin text of the Agnus Dei which influenced the design of the Adagio, among other internal evidence that sheds light on Bruckner's religious motivation in composing this symphony. Many conductors recognize the significance of Bruckner's dedication of the work to God, yet Honeck has identified the particular instances in the symphony that, like the structure of the Fifth Symphony, clearly reveal Bruckner's faith, and that the Ninth is far from being absolute music without programmatic content. This no doubt adds power to the music and clarifies its somewhat mystifying content. The wide-open sound of this audiophile recording goes far in conveying the expressive depth and sweep of the performance, capturing the orchestra in a spacious acoustic that adds true grandeur to Bruckner's most personal paean to God. © TiVo
From
CD$18.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Warner Classics

From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released November 16, 2010 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES$22.49
CD$14.99

Classical - Released March 20, 2020 | Gramola Records

Hi-Res Booklet
Bruckner's Second, like most of his symphonies, underwent numerous changes and revisions during the composer's lifetime, in this case on the advice of his patron, Hofkapellmeister Herbeck, before the first publication by Bruckner himself, "so as not to overwhelm the audience". The sheet music of the very first 'unheard' version lies in the archive of the Sankt Florian Abbey, from which the prominent Bruckner researcher William Carragan reconstructed the first untouched version of this great symphony. This version is presented as live recording from the "Bruckner Tage 2019" with the Altomonte Orchestra under the baton of Remy Ballot. The Altomonte Orchestra St. Florian was founded in 1996, the 100th anniversary of Anton Bruckner's death, by Augustinus Franz Kropfreiter (1936-2003, composer, organist and regens chori of St Florian) and Thomas Wall (solo cellist) on the basis of an initiative and with the support of the mayor Mag. Eva Reisinger. Since 2003 Matthias Giesen (Music University Vienna, organist and, from 2003 to 2017, regens chori of St. Florian) has been the conductor of the Altomonte Orchestra, while Rémy Ballot has been the "Principal Guest Conductor" since 2013. The orchestra's name refers to the Baroque painters Martino and Bartolomeo Altomonte, who with their frescoes gave the formal state rooms of the monastery of St. Florian their unique and incomparable atmosphere. The Altomonte Orchestra regards the cultivation of the music tradition and church music in St Florian as a special responsibility. © Gramola
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released April 5, 2011 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
Marek Janowski's recordings of Anton Bruckner's symphonies for PentaTone are among the finest renditions available, and they are also among the best sounding SACD releases on this extraordinary label. Working with the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, Janowski presents the Symphony No. 7 in E major with stunning clarity, generous warmth, spacious dimensions, and profound feeling, and the orchestra responds with some of the best playing in its storied history, with technique and expression to match the conductor's exacting standards. Admirers of Bruckner's symphonies know how tricky they are to interpret, in light of the myriad versions and editions in existence and the differing opinions about the composer's intentions. Fortunately, the Seventh Symphony is one of the least controversial, and the Nowak edition Janowski uses is frequently recorded, so it is familiar to fans. (Note for purists: this performance includes the unauthorized cymbal crash at the Adagio's climax, which is the only point of contention in this recording.) Since there is no special case to be made for the symphony's edition, all that's necessary is to listen to the magnificent playing and to take in the majestic pacing of this symphony, which is one of Bruckner's most popular works. Because Janowski and the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande have had great successes with this and the last two Bruckner symphonies, listeners in search of great performances should give them a try, and audiophiles should regard them as required listening. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
Marek Janowski's 2007 recording of Anton Bruckner's unfinished Symphony No. 9 in D minor with the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande is quite possibly the best sounding of any recording ever made of this work, and the hybrid multichannel SACD format gives it every possible advantage. From the soft, somber fanfares that open the first movement to the radiant major chord that closes the Adagio, Janowski draws a well-rounded and burnished tone from this exceptional orchestra that is exactly what one wants in Bruckner, even in this grave and austere symphony. Surprisingly, the orchestra under Janowski delivers something very close to a weighty German sound, despite its reputation for having a lighter French quality under its founding conductor, Ernest Ansermet. All of the monumental climaxes, ponderous cadences, and heroic perorations are played with maximum force, yet the Suisse Romande demonstrates that it can turn on a dime and play with a gentle Viennese lilt in the lyrical episodes. The direct stream digital recording captures this magnificent playing with wonderful fidelity, but what makes this truly remarkable is its extremely wide dynamic range, which allows even the faintest diminuendos and the most distant effects to be heard absolutely clearly without artificial boosting. Since one's attention can drift in these quiet passages, it's good that Janowski keeps up the intense focus of the playing and makes the details clear enough to follow. So with the astute direction of the conductor, the brilliant musicianship of the orchestra, and the splendid engineering of PentaTone, this fabulous recording deserves the highest marks, and all Brucknerians should hear it as soon as possible. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$15.49
CD$10.99

Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Kings College Cambridge

Hi-Res Booklet
Bruckner's Mass No. 2 in E minor, WAB 27, was composed for mixed chorus, not for an English cathedral choir with boy sopranos, and listeners will make up their own minds about this departure from tradition. It's interesting that the late Choir of King's College, Cambridge, director Stephen Cleobury chose this work for his final recording with the choir: it's far from the group's usual wheelhouse, or his own, yet one can understand his motivations. The work is a real challenge for the singers, with long stretches of polyphony blooming into moments of radiant faith. Sample the Credo and listen to the glorious Resurrexit, and the appeal of Cleobury's approach becomes clear. The young singers do everything that's asked of them, and in its way, this is a virtuoso performance. In the short motets that make up the balance of the program, the ages of the singers are less of an issue, and the performances have the feel of a group that revels in its own space. The Locus iste is memorable in its soaring quality. Ultimately listener reactions here will depend on how they feel about the extension of boy singers into this repertory, but the album makes a fine swan song for Cleobury's always progressive and remarkable career. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | MUNCHNER PHILHARMONIKER GBR

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | MUNCHNER PHILHARMONIKER GBR

Hi-Res
From
CD$17.99

Classical - Released November 20, 2017 | La discothèque idéale de Diapason

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or