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Classical - Released June 1, 2018 | Evidence

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released December 2, 2016 | Alia Vox

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Classical - Released January 14, 2008 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released November 23, 2018 | harmonia mundi

The music recorded here is taken from a twelfth century manuscript that originated in the basilica of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, based on the liturgical practices of the Knights Templar, a non-monastic order founded to protect Jerusalem and the Christians who made pilgrimage there. The CD avoids the monotony that can sometimes afflict recordings of Very Early Music. The variety of styles -- monophonic chant, melodies sung over a drone, parallel organum (in which several voices sing the same melody at the interval of the fifth or octave), and three-part polyphony -- maintains a high level of interest. The musical material strays frequently from the strict modal practices that characterized music more closely connected with Roman liturgical traditions and is sometimes astonishingly chromatic and dissonant. The free use and style of ornamentation demonstrate the influences of the musical culture of the Middle East. Several of the pieces have a stronger feeling of a regular pulse than much chant, reflecting the physical, almost dance-like motions that conductor Marcel Pérès describes as being an integral part of the original performance of this repertoire. The music and the performances are genuinely gripping and should be revelatory for anyone whose only experience with music from this period has been pallid performances of unison plainchant. Ensemble Organum sings this repertoire with conviction and simplicity. The voices are obviously well trained and the intonation and ensemble are excellent, but the vocal quality is unmannered and direct, ideally suited to the self-effacing aesthetic appropriate for music not intended for performance, but as an act of worship within a close-knit community. The recording was made in the wonderfully resonant 900-year-old Abbey of Fontevraud and effectively conveys the vastness of the acoustical space without sacrificing clarity. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Alpha

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc du Monde de la Musique - Recommandé par Répertoire
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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | naïve classique

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Celtic - Released March 5, 2012 | Alpha

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Classical - Released April 14, 2008 | harmonia mundi

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Africa - Released January 1, 1977 | Mali - Syllart Records

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Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

A strictly traditional flamenco record, Pepe Romero's 1987 recording Flamenco! features not only his own sterling guitar work, but also singer Chano Lobato's expressive vocals and, in an inspired touch that not enough flamenco artists have thought of, two genuine flamenco dancers, Maria Magdalena and Paco Romero. Flamenco, after all, is dance music, and as in some forms of English contra dancing, Appalachian clog dancing, and other forms of folk music, the percussive sound of the dancers' shoes (and the female dancer's traditional castanets) is intended as part of the music. As a result, Flamenco! has a vitality and excitement often missing from classical flamenco records, which can sometimes come off as a bit stuffy and overly serious. Lobato's voice, a dusky alto with a beautifully controlled vibrato, suits the material perfectly, capturing the florid theatricality of flamenco music without going over the top. There are undoubtedly better flamenco records than this, but there are few that are as much fun. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Classical - Released May 29, 2013 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released May 3, 2019 | Arcana

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Could you ever imagine that one of the most popular saints in the Christian calendar of the Middle Ages was - Buddha? After ten years of research in a multitude of libraries worldwide, Katarina Livljanić and the ensemble Dialogos, faithfull to their exploratory and fearless spirit, bring yet another surprise from the less known medieval lands, after its award-winning albums such as Dalmatica: Chants of the Adriatic, Lombards & Barbares, La vision de Tondal, Judith: A Biblical Story from Renaissance Croatia. It is the incredible story of saints Barlaam and Josaphat, a christianized version of Buddha's life, which crossed over at least four religions and was transmitted through almost all the medieval languages. Powerful songs — incarnated by voice and instruments, sing the legend about the king's son, prince Josaphat, who leaves the noisy world of opulence to search for inner peace — songs which follow the path of his story from one medieval language to another, from Greek, Latin to Old Croatian, Italian, Church Slavonic… © Alpha Classics
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Classical - Released October 25, 2019 | Ricercar

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Classical - Released May 24, 2019 | Ambronay Éditions

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Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released June 19, 2009 | Arcana

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released November 23, 2018 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released January 1, 1987 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Do not be mistaken. This is not the scenic cantata Carmina Burana composed in the 1930s by Carl Orff but the original medieval collection discovered in 1803 in the archives of the Benediktbeuern Abbey in Germany. It is a compilation of three hundred and fifteen sacred and secular songs (both types highly associated with the Middle Ages) composed in latin, middle High German and even French by defrocked monks and itinerant students. This colourful heterogeneous mix sings of wine, life and love in all its forms and was recorded numerous times by an ensemble of specialists in the 1960s. This Philip Pickett recording, carried out in 1987, marvellously reproduces the colours of this vast and satyric ensemble from the 12th and 13th centuries. Numerous instrumental and vocal soloists feature, including the soprano Catherine Bott who has long collaborated with Picket and his ensemble of virtuoso musicians. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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World - Released January 1, 2014 | Esoteria Records

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released June 30, 2009 | Oehms Classics

The words "original version" on the cover of this release are doubtless intended to indicate to the casual browser that this is not a recording of Carl Orff's choral spectacle called Carmina Burana, but of the pieces that inspired that work, contained in a medieval manuscript rediscovered in the nineteenth century in a Bavarian village called Benediktbeuern (hence "Carmina Burana," or songs or Beuern). For listeners who have followed the early music scene since its flowering in the 1970s; however, the notation may be a little misleading. For this is not the "original version" of the medieval Carmina Burana recorded by the Clemencic Consort and its pioneering leader René Clemencic around 1976, but a return to the music by the same group, appropriately gray around the temples. It's still state of the art. There are some differences and some similarities. Chief among the former is that this release contains only one disc of songs from the 200-odd pieces in the Codex Buranus; the previous release had three discs. Nevertheless, the album includes samples from all the categories represented in the manuscript: the delightfully named Carmina Moralia et Satirica (Songs of Morality and Satire), the Carmina Divina (Divine Songs), the Carmina Veris et Amoris (Songs of Spring and Love), the Carmina Amoris Infelicis (Songs of Unhappy Love), and the Carmina Potatorum (Drinking Songs). The Carmina Burana as a whole is known for its raunchier moments, of which several are included here, but what's less well known is that it included some lovely examples of religious poetry. Clemencic assembles these contrasting elements into an almost quasi-dramatic structure, probably resembling no program that would have been sung in the songs' own time, but quite effective for the modern hearer and tighter in conception than the larger earlier release. The similarities include the retention of a generally raucous atmosphere that recognizes that these were student songs. The male vocalists adopt an almost rock & roll-like vocal timbre that raises the energy level quite a bit, but may not be attractive for those who go into a medieval recording looking for a meditative quality (they are, it's true, in the wrong place already with the Carmina Burana). That said, this reading has more of a quality of precisely controlled high energy than did the earlier recording. The instrumental sound reflects evolving conceptions of how medieval music was accompanied. Clemencic uses a hint of Arabic influence in the form of a darabuka clay drum, and the collection of instruments also includes a hurdy-gurdy and a Scandinavian nyckelharpa, or keyed fiddle. These revolve from piece to piece, and in general the most striking feature of this disc is the variation in sound from track to track. Texts are given in the original language (Latin or medieval German), modern German, and English. The engineering is top-notch, and the Clemencic Consort shows that it can still set the standard for medieval music after being at it for several decades. © TiVo