Albums

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Hard Rock - Released February 8, 2019 | Debemur Morti Productions

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Pop - Released November 16, 2018 | Elea

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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$65.49

Rock - Released November 2, 2018 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Best New Reissue
For fans of Bob Dylan's wide-ranging Bootleg series, More Blood, More Tracks (Vol. 14) is an entryway into one of the most mysterious, tangled stories in his recording career. These six discs contain the complete recordings sessions for 1975's Blood on the Tracks, 87 tracks in all, the vast majority unreleased. This box assists in offering a view of the process behind one of the songwriter's most enigmatic albums. On September 16 of 1974, Dylan entered Columbia's Studio with engineer Phil Ramone, with songs at once seething with anger, brokenness, and vulnerability. Written and recorded during his eventual divorce from first wife Sara, Dylan shrouds these songs in alliteration and metaphor, stretching time itself as past and present, commingling in numerous locations; they separate and return in new configurations. His protagonists speak in first and third person, often in the same verse. Once encountered, however, they're impossible to shake. Presented here are the complete sessions of the four days in New York, chronologically recorded, and, for the first time at the proper speed (Dylan had Ramone bump the master tape speed to make the tunes faster for radio play), and without the substantial reverb on the original tapes. These tunes were cut in a fit of white-heat inspiration, first by Dylan solo, and then with a band of folk-associated sidemen in Eric Weissberg & Deliverance. By the time you reach discs three through five, all the accompaniment, save for Dylan's guitar, harmonica, Tony Brown's bass, and occasional pedal steel and organ, are stripped away, resulting in what was then thought to be the completed album. Scheduled for late December release with a promotional campaign drafted, printed cover, and test pressings distributed, Dylan wasn't satisfied. Ultimately, he kept only one band track, "Meet Me in the Morning." He spent Christmas in Minnesota with his producer brother David Zimmerman, who was also less than enthused with the tracks. Dylan called his label and insisted on holding the album back. On December 27, he and a band of hastily assembled local players re-recorded five songs to complete Blood on the Tracks (captured on disc six). Since nearly half-a-million copies of the cover were already printed, the Minnesota musicians remained uncredited until now. This is exhaustive but fascinating material that sounds fantastic due to a painstaking remixing job -- nothing here sounds like a rough demo. Check the nine takes of "Idiot Wind," some offer different words, all roil with anger and bitterness. "You're Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go" is gradually revealed as one of Dylan's finest love songs in a dozen more takes. "You're a Big Girl Now," in 15 takes, is peeled away from its sarcasm to reveal a man saddled with regret. Multiple versions of "Tangled Up in Blue," "Lily Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts," and "Simple Twist of Fate" offer proof that there were many versions of the songs before they assumed their final incarnations. Dylan's constant rewriting and creative flow are captured warts and all in false starts, stuttering alternate takes, studio conversation, and flowing inspiration in complete versions. There are hours of fascination awaiting listeners, and the music poses as many new questions as it does answers surrounding the album's mythos. As for the autobiographical nature of the content, it remains, thankfully, unclear. The enclosed photo book is as essential as the liner essays in the deluxe package. By any measure, More Blood, More Tracks is a monumentally important document in the history of popular music and a gem in Dylan's catalog. ~ Thom Jurek
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Rock - Released November 2, 2018 | Sanctuary Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 19, 2018 | Communion Group Ltd

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Qobuzissime
It wouldn't be right to reduce Tamino-Amir Moharam Fouad simply to an heir of Jeff Buckley with hints of Radiohead from their earlier years. The Belgian songwriter, only 21 years old, offers much more than that on his first album, even if Colin Greenwood, the bassist from Radiohead, does feature on the album... Tamino, an Antwerp-native and John Lennon-admirer, has always kept his Egyptian origins preserved in a corner of his head, under his jet-black mane. The Arabic music that his mother played at home must have been all the more influential when it was the work of Muharram Fouad, his singer-actor grandfather, a star in Cairo in the sixties... This eclecticism is at the heart of Tamino's music, which owes as much to Buckley folk music as it does to Beatles pop and even to the nonchalant melancholy of Leonard Cohen, another one of his idols. To fuse these disparate influences, the mysterious young man possesses a deadly weapon: his voice. It’s an equally versatile organ, capable of stretching slowly and transforming itself into a stunning falsetto, an impressive technique that he never abuses. It is this voice that transforms Amir into a long and poignant novel. A coming-of-age story that alternates between the dreamer (the pure folk on Verses) and the lyrical poet as on So It Goes, Each Time and Intervals, conceived around a section of Arabic strings. A Qobuzissime album that’s oozing with original and touching poetry. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 12, 2018 | Concord Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
From the release of his debut album, My Aim Is True, in 1977, Elvis Costello expressed his musical gluttony by mixing explosive pub rock, reggae tones, almost country-like ballads and pop songs sculpted with crystalline arpeggios. It was this eclecticism that allowed him to work with people as diverse as George Jones (the godfather of country music), Burt Bacharach (the master of pop lounge), the mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, the jazz guitarist Bill Frisell, and even the rappers from The Roots, just to name a few… Forty years later, the elusive spectacled Brit (having always been fond of concept albums), releases Look Now with the Imposters, featuring Steve Nieve on keyboards, Davey Faragher on bass and Pete Thomas (already the drummer of his group Attractions). This group, with whom he recorded Momofuku in 2008, give him the chance to get his writing pen out once again… and it’s as sharp as ever. Here he has shared the writing responsibilities with the great Carole King on Burnt Sugar Is so Bitter, co-written 25 years earlier, as well as with Bacharach on Photographs Can Lie and Don't Look Now. Once again, it feels like Costello is searching for the perfect pop song. He takes an approach that screams 1960s. However, the timelessness of the album anchors the songwriter well in his time, in 2018. Costello succeeds in writing melodies and lyrics that stick in his listeners’ heads. A good song, as we all know, is ageless and Elvis Costello certainly reminds us of that here... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 5, 2018 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
A guitar held up by the neck, a child's head pressed against the holder's body. Cat Power reveals a lot with the cover of her tenth album. The American is up and running again and now she is a mother. At 46, Chan Marshall seems to be doing... better? Well, It's not as if her life, which has been studded with internal chaos, turbulence, a lot of moving around, depression and addiction is going to be all plain sailing from here on in, but Wanderer contains some of her most beautiful songs yet. Stripped-down compositions. A simple piano. A few notes on a guitar. A lean rhythm section. It's clear that the message here is "less is more." Perhaps her aim is to return to the roots of her old folk and blues mentors. Bringing a child into the world during the Trump era is enough to get anyone thinking again... And Cat Power hasn't sung for years. Her tones with their bluesy style, unmistakeable from the first syllable, reach sublime heights here. After a slightly electro detour with Sun, mixed by Zdar from Cassius, she doesn't give us too many surprises here in terms of the pretty classical form of her songs, but the surprise comes in the sheer quality of the tracks. One of her biggest fans, Lana Del Rey, makes an appearance on the album on the track Woman maintaining the sober feel to this beautiful and honest record. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz  
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 28, 2018 | Cracki Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Rock - Released September 28, 2018 | Lupus Lounge

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 14, 2018 | Naive

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Rock - Released September 14, 2018 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
As the icon of a generation, a bona fide star since his beginnings with the Jam, the Modfather has always inspired and fascinated fans, even just with his haircut! And in the year of his 60th birthday, Paul Weller is still giving his best. As always… Made up for the most part of acoustic songs, True Meanings, his 26th album (the 14th in solo), is far removed from his 2015 Saturns Pattern. Here, Weller seems to take a step back and reflect. He goes back to something extremely simple, straightforward, a floral and poetic album. As if the recording took place in a flowery meadow on a summer evening for an audience of insomniac romantics. Introspection is under way. The British artist studies the elements around him, dwells on his memories, sings a fanciful tribute to Bowie, all without omitting his distortions between jazz and soul… True Meanings in itself is a Wellerian praise of ballad. It starts nicely and slowly with a guitar theme, before being wrapped in violins and background vocals. It’s an absolute delight to hear the Modfather live up to his seventies masterpieces like English Rose and Liza Radley. Even though Bruce Foxton and Rick Buckler are no longer by his side in the studio, Paul Weller has always managed to surround himself with talent, as illustrated by the guests on True Meanings: Rod Argent from the Zombies (The Soul Searchers), Lucy Rose (Books), Tom Doyle (Movin On) and even a small appearance of Noel Gallagher on White Horses… A calm, laidback voice that fits perfectly with the few compositions of songwriter Erland Cooper from the band Erland and the Carnival. Two lyricists for an album that discreetly and subtly draws from genres, like this invention of a glam-rock picking ballad: Mayfly. A beautiful reference to T. Rex’s Get It On, without the glitter of course. No doubt about it, Paul Weller is a “Changingman” with delicate taste. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz

Alternative & Indie - Released August 31, 2018 | Jazz Village

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Qobuzissime
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Dying today. In Creole, mo jodi. The title says it all for Delgres’ first album, an impeccable trio that could easily be compared to what would happen if the Black Keys dropped their anchor in the Antilles… Delgres for Louis Delgrès, an abolitionist infantry colonel born in Saint-Pierre, famous for his anti-slavery proclamation, a high point of Guadeloupe’s resistance against Napoleonic troops who wanted to restore the slave trade. When Louis Delgrès and his 300 men realised all was lost when faced with Bonaparte’s soldiers, they decided to commit suicide using their explosives, by virtue of the revolutionary emblem live free or die… However, this historic name doesn’t constrain Pascal Danaë, Baptiste Brondy and Rafgee to only be a “band with a message”. Delgres proudly waves its name and the ideals that go with it, but focuses first and foremost on making rock with a touch of garage, fed with some primitive blues, raw soul music and sounds from New Orleans. Combining dobro guitar, drums and sousaphone – an atypical tuba popular in the carnival fanfares of the Antilles and New Orleans −, the trio assert their originality. In his writing too, Danaë goes back and forth − with great ease − between Creole and English, blurring the lines between his influences, which he has always treated with taste throughout his long career (he was for instance involved in Rivière Noire, best World Music album at the 2015 Victoires de la Musique). A stylistic kaleidoscope, illustrated by the ballad Séré mwen pli fo, sung in duo with Morcheeba’s Skye Edwards. In its edgier moments as well as nostalgic and absorbing sequences, Mo Jodi talks about History, but also hope, and builds bridges between continents and centuries to create a blissful journey of rock’n’blues’n’soul that will take you by the guts! © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 27, 2018 | Last Gang

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 1, 2018 | Anti - Epitaph

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
In 2016 Neko Case played the trio card with her peers KD Lang and Laura Veirs, for an album that injected her career with much-needed ardour. Two years later, she’s back with a solo album, following The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You, released in 2013. For Hell-On, she reveals herself more than ever, matures and strikes us like thunder! In her compositions, the singer is used to delivering tales and stories that resemble her. But here, Neko Case unveils a much more feminist side. Beyond being a strong woman, she has become a wild character, unpredictable and unleashed, that simply does not hesitate to make love to you… and break a few of your ribs at the same time… A proper obscure and quirky waltz, switching back and forth between alternative country, psychedelic rock and pop ditties. One thing is certain, she’s the one leading the dance! Not forgetting the damage she does with her voice that assimilates every emotion without never losing control. At least that’s an unwavering certainty, as opposed to her compositions that don’t always operate under the verse and chorus structure. But Neko Case also knows when to take risks and get out of her comfort zone, working with unexpected artists like her co-producer Bjorn Yttling, known for his collaborations with Primal Scream and Lykke Li. Hell-On also bears the mark of a tragedy: the burning of her house, from which nothing could be salvaged! Not surprising then to hear a touch of rage in her singing or to witness her lack of fear placing lit-up cigarettes in her hair or lay down in a bed full of snakes in her music videos. A brand-new woman has just emerged from the bowels of the earth and is singing Hell-On! © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 24, 2018 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Tonight’s The Night is one of the greatest dark albums in the history of rock’n’roll. Within six month, Neil Young lost two close friends to overdoses: his guitarist Danny Whitten and his roadie Bruce Berry. It explains why the album he recorded soon after, in August and September 1973 (which was only released in June 1975, after On The Beach), was so dark… The introspective trip of Tonight’s The Night feeds on these personal tragedies and blends them with the oppressive atmosphere that reigned in the US at the time. Urban violence, rampant drug use, Vietnam War and faltering hippie utopia all contributed to his sombre yet sublime and poignant partition. Even the instrumentation of Tonight’s The Night is wavering between a flickering piano and a thrifty pedal steel guitar. A stripped-bare style to better highlight the beauty of the melodies on moving ballads like Tired Eyes, New Mama and Borrowed Tune… On September 20th, 21st and 22nd of 1973, Neil Young and his musicians, baptised the Santa Monica Flyers (with Ben Keith on the pedal steel guitar, Nils Lofgren on the guitar and piano, Billy Talbot on the bass and Ralph Molina on drums), stepped onto the stage of Roxy, a brand-new club in West Hollywood, Los Angeles. In their hands, this new repertoire that stunk of death and sulphur, but the versions they delivered to the Californian public were bursting with true emotional power, real warmth and, at times, a sincere and communicative joy that was – logically – absent from the studio versions. That’s the true magic of this unearthed and restored archive. And while Neil Young’s fans will no doubt have this Roxy − Tonight’s The Night Live on repeat, newcomers can also jump on this stunning bandwagon and discover the universe of a unique musician who was, at the time, on top of his game and writing. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Metal - Released April 20, 2018 | Century Media

Distinctions 4F de Télérama

Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2018 | Bella Union

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 9, 2018 | Ninja Tune

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
After Kayus Bankole, Graham Hastings, and Alloysious Massaquoi won the Mercury Prize for Dead, they affirmed and reaffirmed that their debut album as Young Fathers was simply a start. A strong follow-up was released only six months after they accepted the award. Between the release dates of their second and third albums, amid other creative pursuits, the trio made urgent contributions to Massive Attack's Ritual Spirit and the soundtrack of T2 Trainspotting. Novelist Irvine Welsh fell so hard for his fellow Edinburgh natives that five songs off their first two albums -- in addition to the made-to-order "God Only Knows" -- were licensed for use in T2. Young Fathers' fascinating evolution continues with third full-length Cocoa Sugar. Tiring of being cast as eccentrics, they set out to make comparatively straightforward material, only to end up with their least classifiable, most unique work yet. "Lord," the prelude to the album, indicated the perhaps unintended results with balefully buzzing avant-gospel. Its vague cluster of pained and plainly spoken lyrics are capped with a seemingly disconnected statement -- "While the government wants to control, her culture will set you free" -- that jumps off the page but is delivered during the fade-out like an afterthought. Other instances of bloody-mindedness can be heard in the near concealment of hooks that require close listening to be heard. They're often deliberately distanced from the battery of contrasting vocal lines, laser FX, and rhythms that churn, batter, and rattle, whether evoking Krautrock bands or African tribes. One aspect that does shoot clear through is the high level of ferocity on display throughout a latter-half stretch that concerns immigration and desperate survivalism. It culminates in "Holy Ghost," which jitters and battle-peacocks like Kendrick Lamar's "King Kunta," a rare obvious point of reference. In a way, the crammed, almost impenetrable layers of sound recall specific phases of Simple Minds (Sons and Fascination/Sister Feelings Call), Associates (Sulk), and maybe even Cocteau Twins (the darker parts of Head Over Heels). Like those Scottish post-punk recordings, Cocoa Sugar mystifies before it gratifies, but it reflects a modern global chaos as much as it does a personal one. ~ Andy Kellman

Alternative & Indie - Released March 2, 2018 | Bella Union

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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He is the rare bird. On tour with Roger Waters, whom he assisted for his latest album, by doing a lot of arrangements and refusing even more, or alongside Erykah Bady, Elvis Costello or even Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Jonathan Wilson seems to be everywhere. And he does wonders. With Rare Birds, Wilson pens maybe one of his better discs. Surreal verses, slightly psychedelic ramblings, muffled tempos, his thirteen tracks drawn out on more than 80 blunt minutes, a somewhat long and exhilarating rock wave. From Trafalgar Square’s sacred progressions, which seem carved out of the layers of Camel’s Mystic Queen, to Mulholland Queen’s piano and Hi Ho The Righteous’s country folk strings, Wilson stretches the watercolor nuances of a classic rock focused on Venus, blessed by the winds of the eminently favorable Californian Gods. As always with the modern griot from Laurel Canyon, it is sophisticated without being fake, handcrafted while being deeply modern, melodic, luxurious and full of elegance. Three birds from other paradises will complete the set: Lana Del Rey on Living With Myself, Father John Misty on 49 Hairflips and Laraaji on Loving You. Radiating with the positive rays from this guru, this third album can curl up between the constellations formed by Fleetwood Mac, Jethro Tull, Neil Young and J.J. Cale. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz

Alternative & Indie - Released March 2, 2018 | 4AD

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Internal feuds and heroin in the crook of the arm of her twin didn’t rattle the more relaxed female rocker: Kim Deal. Nirvana with boobs and with ballsy grunge, the Breeders kindled the indie rock scene by reminding people that even if there wasn’t anyone to welcome them, there was a feminine scene. Imploding in 1993 after the aptly named Last Splash, the quartet saw Kim go back to the Pixies when Kelley went into rehab. Two other albums, Title TK in 2002 and Mountain Battles in 2008, reminded us that the beast could still move… Since a concert in 2013 brought back the hope of a reunion, the two sisters, the bass player Josephine Wiggs and the drummer Jim MacPherson went back to the studio for All Nerve. Grunge entanglement resuscitating from the rough nineties, this lightning opus (33 minutes) blasts a tried and tested formula. If the dirty guitar-bass-drums and vocal distortions recipe doesn’t cause the Cannonball effect that made their success, All Nerve carries the mark of the painful decades that followed. As proof, the distorted ballads Space Woman, Dawn: Making An Effort, Blues At The Acropolis. It is dark and nervous. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz