Qobuz’s experts gather all the essentials of each genre. These albums have marked music history and become major landmarks.

With the Ideal Discography you (re)discover legendary recordings, all whilst building on your musical knowledge.

Albums

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Electronic/Dance - Released June 15, 2015 | Parlophone France

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 30, 2013 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released November 5, 2012 | Parlophone France

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4 stars out of 5 -- "[It's] perhaps, her best: a set of ballads build around piano and strings, on which the promises, infelicities and heartbreaks of an impossible love are laid bare."
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Electronic/Dance - Released June 25, 2012 | Parlophone France

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Since the advent of acid jazz in the mid-'80s, the many electronic-jazz hybrids to come down the pipe have steadily grown more mature, closer to a balanced fusion that borrows the spontaneity and emphasis on group interaction of classic jazz while still emphasizing the groove and elastic sound of electronic music. For his second album, French producer Ludovic Navarre expanded the possibilities of his template for jazzy house by recruiting a sextet of musicians to solo over his earthy productions. The opener "Rose Rouge" is an immediate highlight, as an understated Marlena Shaw vocal sample ("I want you to get together/put your hands together one time"), trance-state piano lines, and a ride-on-the-rhythm drum program frames solos by trumpeter Pascal Ohse and baritone Claudio de Qeiroz. For "Montego Bay Spleen," Navarre pairs an angular guitar solo by Ernest Ranglin with a deep-groove dub track, complete with phased effects and echoey percussion. "Land Of..." moves from a Hammond- and horn-led soul-jazz stomp into Caribbean territory, marked by more hints of dub and the expressive Latin percussion of Carneiro. Occasionally, Navarre's programming (sampled or otherwise) grows a bit repetitious -- even for dance fans, to say nothing of the jazzbo crowd attracted by the album's Blue Note tag. Though it is just another step on the way to a perfect blend of jazz and electronic, Tourist is an excellent one. ~ John Bush
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Classical - Released April 18, 2012 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released January 4, 2012 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released January 4, 2012 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released October 6, 2011 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released November 24, 2010 | Parlophone France

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Influenced by the deaths of his father, former bandmate Daniel Roux (Aubert ‘n' Ko), and longtime friend Fred Chichin (Les Rita Mitsouko), Roc' Eclair is the unsurprisingly melancholic seventh studio album from former Téléphone frontman Jean-Louis Aubert. The follow-up to 2005's Ideal Standard pursues a more folk-rock direction than previous releases and includes the single "Demain Sera Parfait." ~ Jon O'Brien

Pop - Released September 8, 2010 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released March 5, 2010 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released November 30, 1985 | Parlophone France

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Pop - Released July 6, 2009 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released October 31, 2007 | Parlophone France

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Jazz - Released March 9, 2007 | Parlophone France

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Jazz - Released November 15, 2005 | Parlophone France

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French Music - Released November 14, 2005 | Parlophone France

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After many stubborn years in the pop desert with an ever-dwindling fan base, Telephone's former frontman scores not only with critics, but wins back older fans and garners new ones with Ideal Standard. The album is a solid pop/rock showcase for Jean-Louis Aubert's humanist concerns; it also contains a musical setting to Arthur Rimbaud's poem "Sensation" as the album closer. ~ Thom Jurek
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French Music - Released September 30, 2005 | Parlophone France

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After his 2003 debut album, L’Amour Parfait, which contained the benchmark single "C'est Quand le Bonheur?," Cali became one of the brightest of France’s emerging pop stars. After a couple of live releases, this set, Menteur, his sophomore studio effort, hit the streets in the fall of 2005. Some editions include the bonus track “La Lettre.” ~ Steve Leggett
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Dance - Released March 7, 2001 | Parlophone France

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Four long years after their debut, Homework, Daft Punk returned with a second full-length, also packed with excellent productions and many of the obligatory nods to the duo's favorite stylistic speed bumps of the 1970s and '80s. Discovery is by no means the same record, though. Deserting the shrieking acid house hysteria of their early work, the album moves in the same smooth filtered disco circles as the European dance smashes ("Music Sounds Better with You" and "Gym Tonic") that were co-produced by DP's Thomas Bangalter during the group's long interim. If Homework was Daft Punk's Chicago house record, this is definitely the New York garage edition, with co-productions and vocals from Romanthony and Todd Edwards, two of the brightest figures based in New Jersey's fertile garage scene. Also in common with classic East Coast dance and '80s R&B, Discovery surprisingly focuses on songwriting and concise productions, though the pair's visions of bucolic pop on "Digital Love" and "Something About Us" are delivered by an androgynous, vocoderized frontman singing trite (though rather endearing) love lyrics. "One More Time," the irresistible album opener and first single, takes Bangalter's "Music Sounds Better with You" as a blueprint, blending sampled horns with some retro bass thump and the gorgeous, extroverted vocals of Romanthony going round and round with apparently endless tweakings. Though "Aerodynamic" and "Superheroes" have a bit of the driving acid minimalism associated with Homework, here Daft Punk is more taken with the glammier, poppier sound of Eurodisco and late R&B. Abusing their pitch-bend and vocoder effects as though they were going out of style (about 15 years too late, come to think of it), the duo loops nearly everything they can get their sequencers on -- divas, vocoders, synth-guitars, electric piano -- and conjures a sound worthy of bygone electro-pop technicians from Giorgio Moroder to Todd Rundgren to Steve Miller. Daft Punk are such stellar, meticulous producers that they make any sound work, even superficially dated ones like spastic early-'80s electro/R&B ("Short Circuit") or faux-orchestral synthesizer baroque ("Veridis Quo"). The only crime here is burying the highlight of the entire LP near the end. "Face to Face," a track with garage wunderkind Todd Edwards, twists his trademarked split-second samples and fully fragmented vision of garage into a dance-pop hit that could've easily stormed the charts in 1987. Daft Punk even manage a sense of humor about their own work, closing with a ten-minute track aptly titled "Too Long." ~ John Bush
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Dance - Released May 4, 2004 | Parlophone France

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If the electroclash movement did anything besides get a bunch of gawky people laid, it nourished the liberal vertical marketing of electronics through the sediment of music. That fief's unintentional yet nevertheless influential royal Miss Kittin takes its latent notions to heart and foot for I Com, her solo debut. By 2003 a mostly full-time Berliner, Kittin collaborated for the record with that berg's Tobi Neumann and Thies Mynther, producer dudes who have files on both Chicks on Speed and Peaches. This feels right, as Kittin has cut a solo rug that's informed by the Chicks' newsprint clothing art beat futurism and dyed in Peaches' sexy muddy juice, but is drier and droller than either, and cooler than a night on the town with the universe's most hippest kid. She's always been smart, this one called Kittin. But with I Com, she has winnowed her dueling personas -- brilliant techno-inflected DJ and haughtily self-aware vocalist -- into a fantastically complete, wildly inventive package that offers the lunatic best of both badass sides. "Professional Distortion" splatters guitar distortion over clicking rhythms and rap detachment from the woman herself; "Requiem for a Hit" drops salty lyrics ("Um, excuse me, would you mind to...pump?") on a peppery beat, before getting all naughty over lite rock plinks. But I Com isn't all about the dancefloor. "Happy Violentine" is a coldly functional valentine, a blippy Teutonic take on Björk's odd bird emotion poetry. "No love is part of the job," intones Miss Kittin. "Switch me in a standby mode/Until someone presses play." "Allergic" and "Clone Me," too, sound like electronicized versions of shrill post-punk detachment, while Kittin's old pal Hacker appears for "Soundtrack of Now," I Com's Detroit techno interpretation. The album's production is strong and the beats are varied and inventive throughout. But Kittin's album truly excels in its darkest, weirdest moments. The seven-minute-plus "Dub About Me" is unsettling in its extrapolated, minimalist rhythms -- its dark shadows steadily coalesce into a demonic lover built from blown circuit boards. Best is "I Come.com," where Kittin becomes the robotic voice of Wi-Fi feminism, daring you to take a trip through her wires. Careful -- the essence of Siouxsie Sioux is haunting your Blackberry. In the end, none of I Com is really techno -- it's technique. The best bits and pieces of the post-everything genres have been rearranged in a newfangled data stream to represent Miss Kittin's very elusive, entirely accessible muse. The alluring result is cool, reloaded. ~ Johnny Loftus