Qobuz’s experts gather all the essentials of each genre. These albums have marked music history and become major landmarks.

With the Ideal Discography you (re)discover legendary recordings, all whilst building on your musical knowledge.

Albums

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Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$20.99
$17.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$20.99
$17.99

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard - Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Pop - Released January 1, 1963 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Exceptional sound
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 14, 1976 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
Of the three recordings Junior Mance made for Capitol, two were within a big-band format. Straight Ahead is the second of the two large-group recordings. The band is populated by some of the top studio musicians and bandmembers on the West Coast, including Don Fagerquist and Pete Candoli on trumpet, Milt Bernhart on trombone, and Shelly Manne on drums. Bob Bain fronts the group and wrote the charts. The major difference from the previous recording is that it's all brass here; no reeds are present. Combining Mance's natural blues-inflected piano with a big horn sound is a true aural treat. The result is a musical conversation with each side taking turns playing on or over the melody line. On "Li'l Darlin'," the band plays the familiar slow-drag melody while Mance improvises on top. There's a heated call and response on "Happy Time," with Mance going out swinging against blaring riffs by the brass. A similar swinging conversation takes place on "The Late, Late Show," with the band kicking off the cut with a roaring trumpet call. Usually a large-ensemble format doesn't allow for much diversion from the charts. Here it's clear that the band stayed with the charts, but Mance was allowed a good deal of leeway in his playing. He could respond to the call of the band as he saw fit. The result is a dynamic session combining the best of a disciplined brass assembly with the unfettered play of a top jazz improvisor. Some enterprising label should take the first album Mance made with this group, Get Ready, Set, Jump!, combine it with this one, and release them together on a CD. ~ Dave Nathan
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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
$11.49

Disco - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Because A Taste of Honey's first major hit, "Boogie Oogie Oogie," was a lighthearted, escapist piece of ear candy, rock critics of the late '70s didn't take the group seriously and tended to dismiss Janice Marie Johnson and Hazel Payne as producers' puppets. But they were far from that: In addition to being expressive singers, Johnson and Payne were talented, versatile musicians and songwriters. Anyone who gives this self-titled debut album a serious listen will quickly realize you can't lump Honey in with the type of disco acts that were, in fact, invented by producers or A&R teams. To the more knowledgeable listener, it's also apparent that A Taste of Honey has as much to do with soul and funk as it does with disco. Although "Boogie Oogie Oogie," which became one of the disco era's major anthems, is the gem that made this album sell over one million units in the U.S., it isn't the record's only highlight. Equally impressive are tracks that range from the gritty, funky "You" to the dreamy "Sky High" and the haunting "World Spin." Meanwhile, "You're in Good Hands" is a '60s-flavored soul ballad that should have been a hit (Honey didn't have a hit ballad until "Sukiyaki" in 1980). Produced by Fonce and Larry Mizell, A Taste of Honey is excellent from start to finish. ~ Alex Henderson
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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Dwight Twilley's first album, Sincerely, opens with "I'm on Fire," a pop tune so unstoppable that it became a Top 20 single even though Twilley and his partner Phil Seymour didn't have an album to go with it when it hit radio in the spring of 1975. It would be close to a year before Sincerely finally emerged, after sessions at London's Trident Studio were scrapped in favor of material recorded in Twilley's hometown of Tulsa, OK. Commercially, the decision was nearly fatal to Twilley's career momentum, but it's hard to argue with what he and Seymour came up with; with the two handling nearly all the vocals and instruments themselves, they crafted a power pop masterpiece, one that merged their Anglophile leanings with the Southern roots of rock & roll better than any of their contemporaries (including Big Star, who never seemed as comfortable with Memphis soul as they were with Liverpool pop). While nothing on the album quite matches the genius of "I'm on Fire" (what does?), the rest of the album is a consistently impressive, nodding towards a number of rock & roll touchstones while sounding confidently original at all times; the Raspberries-on-downs glide of "Baby, Let's Cruise," the loping updated rockabilly of "T.V.," the funky groove of "Feeling in the Dark," the Searchers-esque jangle of "Three Persons," and the broken-hearted melancholy of "I'm Losing You" could each be the work of a different band, but the strength of Twilley's songwriting and Seymour's versatile vocal chops bring a welcome unity to these many shades of pop perfection. While Twilley and Seymour would both enjoy long careers with a certain degree of success, neither ever made an album quite as good as Sincerely -- though they came close. ~ Mark Deming
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2010 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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R&B - Released January 1, 2007 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Prior to Nick of Time, Bonnie Raitt had been a reliable cult artist, delivering a string of solid records that were moderate successes and usually musically satisfying. From her 1971 debut through 1982's Green Light, she had a solid streak, but 1986's Nine Lives snapped it, falling far short of her usual potential. Therefore, it shouldn't have been a surprise when Raitt decided to craft its follow-up as a major comeback, collaborating with producer Don Was on Nick of Time. At the time, the pairing seemed a little odd, since he was primarily known for the weird hipster funk of Was (Not Was), but the match turned out to be inspired. Was used Raitt's classic early-'70s records as a blueprint, choosing to update the sound with a smooth, professional production and a batch of excellent contemporary songs. In this context, Raitt flourishes; she never rocks too hard, but there is grit to her singing and playing, even when the surfaces are clean and inviting. And while she only has two original songs here, Nick of Time plays like autobiography, which is a testament to the power of the songs, performances, and productions. It was a great comeback album that made for a great story, but the record never would have been a blockbuster success if it wasn't for the music, which is among the finest Raitt ever made. She must have realized this, since Nick of Time served as the blueprint for the majority of her '90s albums. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Film Soundtracks - Released May 18, 2004 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2003 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography