Qobuz’s experts gather all the essentials of each genre. These albums have marked music history and become major landmarks.

With the Ideal Discography you (re)discover legendary recordings, all whilst building on your musical knowledge.

Albums

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Jazz - Released March 10, 2017 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Bebop - Released August 8, 1957 | Verve Reissues

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Vocal Jazz - Released April 1, 1957 | Verve

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Jazz - Released September 18, 2015 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Film Soundtracks - Released April 14, 1978 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Crooners - Released April 1, 1955 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2014 | Prestige

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2014 | Verve Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2014 | Verve Reissues

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2014 | Verve Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
September of My Years is one of Frank Sinatra's triumphs of the '60s, an album that consolidated his strengths while moving him into new territory, primarily in terms of tone. More than the double-disc set A Man and His Music -- which was released a year after this album -- September of My Years captures how Sinatra was at the time of his 50th birthday. Gordon Jenkins' rich, stately, and melancholy arrangements give the album an appropriate reflective atmosphere. Most of the songs are new or relatively recent numbers; every cut fits into a loose theme of aging, reflection, and regret. Sinatra, however, doesn't seem stuck in his ways -- though the songs are rooted in traditional pop, they touch on folk and contemporary pop. As such, the album offered a perfect summary, as well as suggesting future routes for the singer. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Strangers in the Night marked Frank Sinatra's return to the top of the pop charts in the mid-'60s, and it consolidated the comeback he started in 1965. Although he later claimed he disliked the title track, the album was an inventive, rich effort from Sinatra, one that established him as a still-viable star to a wide, mainstream audience without losing the core of his sound. Combining pop hits ("Downtown," [RoviLink="MC"]"On a Clear Day [You Can See Forever],"[/RoviLink] "Call Me") with show tunes and standards, the album creates a delicate but comfortable balance between big band and pop instrumentation. Using strings, horns, and an organ, Nelson Riddle constructed an easy, deceptively swinging sound that appealed to both Sinatra's dedicated fans and pop radio. And Sinatra's singing is relaxed, confident, and surprisingly jazzy, as he plays with the melody of "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World" and delivers a knockout punch with the assured, breathtaking "Summer Wind." Although he would not record another album with Riddle again, Sinatra would expand the approach of Strangers in the Night for the rest of the decade. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2009 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released February 21, 2011 | Nonesuch

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - The Qobuz Standard
Brad Mehldau's latest solo recording, the two-CD/single-DVD Live in Marciac begins with two tracks that contrast his astonishing technical facility and his considerable inventive gift for empathic interpretation. The opening "Storm" is an original four-minute exercise in furious counterpoint, expansive layered harmony, and swinging ostinato; it's followed by a complex yet utterly inventive lyrical reading of Cole Porter's "It's All Right with Me" that not only underscores the lyric in its full harmonic voice, but expands upon it with low- and middle-register arpegiattic studies from Bach and Brahms without losing site of the tune. These are but two of the many surprises on this recorded in 2006. Mehldau ranges over his catalog to revisit his own compositions -- including three from his celebrated first solo piano album Elegiac Cycle -- "Resignation," "Trailer Park Ghost," and "Goodbye Storyteller." These new readings offer an aural view of how much more is in those songs as he's investigated them over the years. Among the performances here are healthy examples of Mehldau's love of rock and modern pop music, including Radiohead's "Exit Music (For a Film)," which closes disc one. Disc two kicks off with another contrasting study, this one music from two musicians who died at their own hands: a thoroughly imaginative reading of Nick Drake's "Things Behind the Sun" (that appeared first on the Live in Tokyo album) followed by its mirror image, Kurt Cobain's "Lithium," using the same percussive left-hand patterns with inverted changes and syncopated lyric accents (they appear as a medley on the DVD). Mehldau also delivers a lovely reading of Lennon & McCartney's "Martha My Dear," where he juxtaposes its sweet melody against a slightly angular, dissonant set of changes. The set closes with a deeply moving imaginative "My Favorite Things," followed by a funky, slamming take on Bobby Timmons' "Dat Dere" (which is missing from the DVD for some reason). For Mehldau's fans, this is another opportunity to hear just how creative and versatile he is, even with familiar material. For the uninitiated, this is a grand opportunity to acquaint yourself with one of the most gifted jazz pianists on the scene. ~ Thom Jurek
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | Original Jazz Classics

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - The Qobuz Standard
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | Riverside

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
The ultra-hip and sophisticated "cool jazz" that Chet Baker (trumpet/vocals) helped define in the early '50s matured rapidly under the tutelage of producer Dick Bock. This can be traced to Baker's earliest sides on Bock's L.A.-based Pacific Jazz label. This album is the result of Baker's first sessions for the independent Riverside label. The Chet Baker Quartet featured on Chet Baker Sings: It Could Happen to You includes Kenny Drew (piano), Sam Jones (bass), and Philly Joe Jones (drums). (Performances by bassist George Morrow and drummer Dannie Richmond are featured on a few cuts.) This results in the successful combination of Baker's fluid and nonchalant West Coast delivery with the tight swinging accuracy of drummer Jones and pianist Drew. Nowhere is this balance better displayed than the opening and closing sides on the original album, "Do It the Hard Way" and "Old Devil Moon," respectively. One immediate distinction between these vocal sides and those recorded earlier in the decade for Pacific Jazz is the lissome quality of Baker's playing and, most notably, his increased capacity as a vocalist. The brilliant song selection certainly doesn't hurt either. This is an essential title in Chet Baker's 30-plus year canon. [Some reissues contain two bonus tracks, "I'm Old Fashioned" and "While My Lady Sleeps"]. ~ Lindsay Planer
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1994 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
These 19 songs cut throughout the 1950s offer a smorgasbord of Roy Eldridge's expertise. There's an impressive array of musical talents and settings here, forming something of a sampler of Eldridge's time on the Verve label. "Ja-Da" finds him combining with a spirited group of Basie alumni, while "Let Me Off Uptown" reunites the trumpeter with Anita O'Day and Gene Krupa in a reprise of their trend-setting 1941 hit which is as aurally fulfilling as the original. "I Remember Harlem" is another standout; here, the moody, atmospheric melody is like few other Eldridge recordings. Against a beautiful and eerie arrangement featuring a bevy of strings and flute, Eldridge's playing is gorgeous and seductive, illuminating the nocturnal mood of the song like a street light on a darkened avenue.
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2009 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Caroline Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
When Capitol Records signed 17-year-old Liza Minnelli to a contract in the wake of her appearance in the Off-Broadway musical Best Foot Forward in the spring of 1963, the label was, of course, taking on the talented daughter of one of its major artists, Judy Garland, and it may have intended to come up with a performer to counter Columbia Records' new star Barbra Streisand. After a couple of singles in 1963, Minnelli went into the studio with Streisand's arranger/conductor Peter Matz in June 1964 and came out three months later with Liza! Liza!, her debut LP. As in Matz's work with Streisand, the arrangements were inventive with occasional touches of humor. "Together Wherever We Go" from Gypsy, for example, was recast as a ballad, while the Rodgers & Hart standard "Blue Moon" began and ended with a twanging electric guitar, in between boasting a brass section as it turned into a medley with "Taking a Chance on Love." And "I'm All I've Got" was a frisky novelty number that showed off Minnelli's comic abilities. But the heart of the album was its ballads, on which Minnelli, to nobody's surprise, sounded a lot like a younger version of her mother, singing with a combination of emotional sensitivity and nearly unbridled power. She showed a special affinity for songs by John Kander and Fred Ebb, including the melancholy "If I Were in Your Shoes" and the hopeful, vulnerable "Maybe This Time." The latter would go on to become a signature song for her when it was interpolated into the movie version of Cabaret in 1972, but in 1964 she was already singing it with fervor. Another highlight was "The Travelin' Life," an early composition by her friend Marvin Hamlisch that could have served as a musical autobiography, given her peripatetic childhood. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Riverside

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography