Qobuz’s experts gather all the essentials of each genre. These albums have marked music history and become major landmarks.

With the Ideal Discography you (re)discover legendary recordings, all whilst building on your musical knowledge.

Albums

$256.99

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1993 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
For an overview of Nat "King" Cole's years as a remarkably popular singer, this four-CD box would be difficult to top. Containing 100 songs spanning a 20-year period, this box has virtually all of Cole's hits, some of his best jazz sides, and more than its share of variety, including a humorous previously unreleased version of "Mr. Cole Won't Rock & Roll." Recommended to beginners and veteran collectors alike, its attractive booklet is also a major asset. ~ Scott Yanow
$32.49
$25.49

Jazz - Released September 18, 2015 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
$38.49

Classical - Released September 5, 2005 | Warner Classics

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$22.49

Rock - Released January 11, 1971 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$22.49

International Pop - Released February 20, 2004 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$29.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Blue Note Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Herbie Nichols occupies a special place on the podium of unfairly forgotten heroes in the history of jazz. This virtuoso, who died of leukaemia at the age of 44, was an innovative pianist with lyrical and rhythmic melodies that were very original for their time. Fascinated by Thelonious Monk, he found his own sound by mixing influences as disparate as Dixieland, Caribbean and classical music by the likes of Bartók or Satie. His transition to Blue Note led to three trio albums: The Prophetic Herbie Nichols Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 (recorded in May 1955 with Al McKibbon on double bass and Art Blakey on drums) and Herbie Nichols Trio (recorded in August 1955 and April 1956 with Teddy Kotick and Al McKibbon on double bass and Max Roach on drums). This box set brings all these recordings together with the added bonus of alternative takes. His improvisations, complex rhythmic patterns, and personal compositions make this Blue Note box set a brilliant gateway into the world of a truly “different” jazzman. In 1957, Herbie Nichols recorded his last record for Bethlehem Records - the equally important Love, Gloom, Cash, Love with George Duvivier on double bass and Dannie Richmond on drums - before falling into oblivion and being eaten away by the illness that took over his life in April 1963... Years later, avant-garde musicians like Misha Mengelberg, Roswell Rudd and Steve Lacy helped bring his music back into the public eye. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$12.99

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Warner Jazz

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The recording history of Little Jimmy Scott is peppered with long hiatuses from the studio. He was absent for a period of seven years from 1962 to 1969 and then for more than 15 years from 1975 to 1990. Bordering on singing in the range of a counter tenor, Scott brings a distinctive, immediately recognizable sound and sensitivity to material he sings. It is hard to find any other vocalist, other than Billie Holiday, who matches Scott's depth of emotion that he applies to the classic standards he favors. All the Way was recorded more than 40 years after Scott made his first album for Roost. Over those years, even with his long absences, he has been able to command the services of top of the line musicians. He is one of those rare vocalists that jazz musicians like to be on the stage or in the studio with. And this album is no exception, featuring an all-star lineup that includes Kenny Barron, Ron Carter, and Grady Tate on rhythm. David "Fathead" Newman's soulful sax on such cuts as "All the Way" compliments Scott's delivery perfectly. Like Scott, Newman leaves abundant room between the measures to allow the song to breathe, the listeners to gain the full flavor of what he has played and to anticipate what's to follow in a second or two. On such tunes as "Angel Eyes" and "At Last," Scott's delivery goes beyond mere poignancy, and moves close to reverence, such respect he has for the classics he has put in the song list. This is good stuff. Strings magically appear on some tracks. But they are done tastefully and don't get in the way. Jimmy McDonough's knowledgeable highlights of Scott's career are a welcome added attraction. ~ Dave Nathan
$10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Blue Note Records

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$7.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Blue Note Records

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This 1961 groove date by Stanley Turrentine is an example of him at his fiery peak. Far from the slow groover of the CTI years, Turrentine's early Blue Note sides were massive and bright, saturated in deep soul and blues. This set featured Turrentine's wife, organist and composer Shirley Scott, and a pair of alternating rhythm sections. The first is Major Holley on bass and Al Harewood on drums, and the second is with Sam Jones and Clarence Johnston. Latin Conguero Ray Barretto appeared with the Holley/Harewood band. The set opens with a stomping version of Lloyd Price's "Trouble," with Scott taking the early solo while driving the groove. Turrentine burns the edges of the tune and Barretto punches up the middle with decorative flourishes and fills. This is followed by the a deeply moving read of "God Bless the Child." With Turrentine playing in his smokiest, silkiest, Ben Webster-inflected tone. Scott's solo, by contrast, is pure blues. The coolest tune on the set is "Major's Minor," written by Stanley and Shirley. With its seeming quotations from "So What?" and "Chim Chim Cherie," in the foreground, it gives way to a completely funky blues, which is a bit of a surprise. But the easy swing and in-the-pocket saxophone soloing punctuated by fat, grooved-out chords by Scott make it the gem it is. The alternate rhythm section of Jones and Johnston appear on the title track. This is one of those grand ballads where the organ acts as the testifying pulpit from which to speak, and Turrentine not only speaks, he weeps and whispers and wails here. All the while his rhythm section layers washes of percussion and muted changes in ever-present but subtle shades of blue. It's a stunner. ~ Thom Jurek
$22.99

Vocal Jazz - Released April 19, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Most of this highly recommended set is taken from a series of 1957 sessions in which singer Chris Connor exclusively interprets songs of George Gershwin. To fill out the CDs, additional Gershwin cuts from other, otherwise unrelated dates by the vocalist have been added. Connor's cool delivery gives many of the largely familiar songs new life. She is assisted by such fine musicians as trumpeter Joe Newman, tenorman Al Cohn, flutist Herbie Mann, vibraphonist Milt Jackson and pianist Ralph Sharon, who add tasteful and concise solos. Many of the selections were quite rare before this well-conceived and appealing reissue was put together. ~ Scott Yanow
$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | Original Jazz Classics

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - The Qobuz Standard
$13.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Though the jazz guitarist Kenny Burrell is associated mostly with Blue Note-based hard bop and soul-jazz (he had a hit with the funky "Chile con Carne"), he is also a musician of considerable artistry. Witness his landmark 1965 collaboration with Gil Evans, Guitar Forms, which rivals anything the arranger did with Miles Davis. Indeed, the track "Lotus Land" has a bolero form very reminiscent of Sketches of Spain. There is no stinting on the blues here, either, as evidenced on "Downstairs" and "Terrace Theme." But the highlights are the bossa nova version of Alec Wilder's "Moon and Sand," as well as a characteristically slow and luxurious treatment of Harold Arlen's "Last Night When We Were Young." Throughout, Burrell takes thoughtful, concise, and utterly musical solos, and even switches to acoustic classical guitar on "Prelude #2" and "Loie." ~ Richard Mortifoglio
$20.99
$17.99

Bebop - Released August 8, 1957 | Verve Reissues

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$10.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1958 | Verve

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Vocalist Blossom Dearie's Summetime is a low-key collection of chamber-jazz arranged for a small trio. Working with guitarist Mundell Lowe, bassist Ray Brown, and drummer Ed Thigpen, Dearie sings the material with a gentle conviction; she may never sound passionate, but she never sounds like she doesn't care. The result is a pleasant record, that might never be a compelling listen, but it's never a bad one. ~ Thom Owens
$20.99
$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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$12.99

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | Riverside

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The ultra-hip and sophisticated "cool jazz" that Chet Baker (trumpet/vocals) helped define in the early '50s matured rapidly under the tutelage of producer Dick Bock. This can be traced to Baker's earliest sides on Bock's L.A.-based Pacific Jazz label. This album is the result of Baker's first sessions for the independent Riverside label. The Chet Baker Quartet featured on Chet Baker Sings: It Could Happen to You includes Kenny Drew (piano), Sam Jones (bass), and Philly Joe Jones (drums). (Performances by bassist George Morrow and drummer Dannie Richmond are featured on a few cuts.) This results in the successful combination of Baker's fluid and nonchalant West Coast delivery with the tight swinging accuracy of drummer Jones and pianist Drew. Nowhere is this balance better displayed than the opening and closing sides on the original album, "Do It the Hard Way" and "Old Devil Moon," respectively. One immediate distinction between these vocal sides and those recorded earlier in the decade for Pacific Jazz is the lissome quality of Baker's playing and, most notably, his increased capacity as a vocalist. The brilliant song selection certainly doesn't hurt either. This is an essential title in Chet Baker's 30-plus year canon. [Some reissues contain two bonus tracks, "I'm Old Fashioned" and "While My Lady Sleeps"]. ~ Lindsay Planer
$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | Original Jazz Classics

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
By the time of this, Art Pepper's tenth recording as a leader, he was making his individual voice on the alto saxophone leave the cozy confines of his heroes Charlie Parker and Lee Konitz. Joining the Miles Davis rhythm section of pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones made the transformation all that more illuminating. It's a classic east meets west, cool plus hot but never lukewarm combination that provides many bright moments for the quartet during this exceptional date from that great year in music, 1957. A bit of a flip, loosened but precise interpretation of the melody on "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" gets the ball rolling, followed by a "Bags Groove" parallel with "Red Pepper Blues," and a delicate, atypical treatment of "Imagination." A compositional collaboration of Pepper and Chambers on the quick "Waltz Me Blues" and hard-edged, running-as-fast-as-he-can take of "Straight Life" really sets the gears whirring. Philly Joe Jones is a great bop drummer, no doubt, one of the all-time greats with Kenny Clarke and Max Roach. His crisp Latin-to-swing pace for "Tin Tin Deo" deserves notice, masterful in its creation and seamlessness. Pepper makes a typical "Star Eyes" brighter, and he goes into a lower octave tone, more like a tenor, for "Birks Works" and the bonus track "The Man I Love." It's clear he has heard his share of Stan Getz in this era. Though Art Pepper played with many a potent trio, this one inspires him to the maximum, and certainly makes for one of his most substantive recordings after his initial incarcerations, and before his second major slip into the deep abyss of drug addiction. ~ Michael G. Nastos
$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Concord Records, Inc.

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$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography