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World - Released November 12, 2020 | Golden Child Entertainment Ltd

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Folk/Americana - Released October 23, 2020 | 4AD

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Folk/Americana - Released October 23, 2020 | 4AD

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
Before Big Thief became indie-folk-rock fans’ favourite band, their singer Adrianne Lenker released three solo albums: Stages of the Sun (2006), Hours Were the Birds (2014) and Abysskiss (2018). This time around, the folk fairy does even more with even less. Alone with her acoustic guitar, she recorded this double album (available separately under the simple titles Songs and Instrumentals) in a cabin in the Berkshires in Massachusetts. You can hear the wood crackling. Birds and insects as well. And even her fingers sliding around on her strings. With every second, the real world slips away a little more. And her fragile voice is like a magnet that pulls you into every melody... She explores classic themes like loneliness, break-up and regret with a hypnotising, stripped-back sound that brings the likes of Vashti Bunyan, Judee Sill, Elliott Smith and Joni Mitchell (obvious influences for the Big Thief singer). Adrianne Lenker often uses repetition, like on the moving song Come where you can hear the rain outside. Sometimes, it’s space that she focuses on (My Angel). Each song is soft and intimate. The two long instrumental pieces (21 and 16 minutes) that make up the second part require more attention but prove to be totally in line with the songs on the first record. You’re left stunned by just how refined both albums are. A sublime work that will easily stand the test of time. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 22, 2020 | 4AD

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
Before Big Thief became indie-folk-rock fans’ favourite band, their singer Adrianne Lenker released three solo albums: Stages of the Sun (2006), Hours Were the Birds (2014) and Abysskiss (2018). This time around, the folk fairy does even more with even less. Sat alone with her acoustic guitar, she recorded this double album (available separately under the simple titles Songs and Instrumentals) in a cabin in the Berkshires in Massachusetts. You can hear the wood crackling. Birds and insects as well. And even her fingers sliding around on her strings. With every second, the real world slips away a little more. And her fragile voice is like a magnet that pulls you into every melody... She explores classic themes like loneliness, break-up and regret with a hypnotising, stripped-back sound that brings the likes of Vashti Bunyan, Judee Sill, Elliott Smith and Joni Mitchell (obvious influences for the Big Thief singer). Adrianne Lenker often uses repetition, like on the moving song Come where you can hear the rain outside. Sometimes, it’s space that she focuses on (My Angel). Each song is soft and intimate. The two long instrumental pieces (21 and 16 minutes) that make up the second part require more attention but prove to be totally in line with the songs on the first record. You’re left stunned by just how refined both albums are. A sublime work that will easily stand the test of time. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 9, 2020 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Addition by subtraction? A punk band selling out? Audio distortion as an artistic principal? The sound of a boom box cranked up? Where's Bob? The Replacements' Pleased to Meet Me continues to answer all these questions and more. In 1986, like a snake shedding its skin, the Minneapolis foursome parted ways with guitarist Bob Stinson, leaving a trio of his younger brother Tommy on bass, drummer Chris Mars and singer/guitarist Paul Westerberg. Westerberg's poppier, more intimate songs and growing ambitions for success immediately began to transform the band. For their fifth album the threesome ended up at Memphis' Ardent Studios in the capable hands of Jim Dickinson, the producer of Big Star's Third, the pianist heard on The Stones' "Wild Horses," and a collaborator with Bob Dylan and Ry Cooder. Described in the liner notes by friends as a "Southern mad scientist," Dickinson engaged in a psychodrama-mind meld with the band and the result was an album that both band and producer would forever after be known for. Because record labels have come to realize that extras are needed for reissues to succeed, two ideas predominate: demos to show how songs were shaped and unreleased concert material to show how the material matured when played live. First reissued with extra tracks in 2008, Rhino's new Pleased to Meet Me reissue is a deep dive into how the tunes evolved from early demos, through rough mixes, outtakes, alternates and tracks that appeared only as singles to a 2020 remaster of the original album. Of the 55 tracks in this reissue, 29 have never been released before. The early demos from Blackberry Way Studios in Minneapolis—which contain Bob Stinson's last recordings with the band—show that the material had structure and rudimentary arrangements before Memphis. The rough mixes of tunes like "Alex Chilton" by Ardent's John Hampton, have a clattery, spacious ambiance and show how much tightening had yet to be done. Of the rough mixes, "Can't Hardly Wait" is a tick slower than the issued take and Dickinson's rollicking piano part on raucous opener "IOU" is lifted up in the mix. An early digital recording which made extensive use of a Fairlight sampler, the sound of Pleased to Meet Me has always been aggressive and embellished, tarted up with touches like the broken glass in "Shooting Dirty Pool," the opening distortion of "Red Red Wine," and Chris and Tommy's opening laughter, their zombie Greek chorus and the mid tune sax growl in "I Don't Know." The oddball lounge jazz of "Nightclub Jitters" is appropriately atmospheric and cool while the "The Ledge," the album's chosen single has the requisite "big" sound which was then attractive to alternative radio and MTV. Visceral but melodic, tender but defiant, as fierce a rock record now as it was the day it was released, Pleased to Meet Me, still epitomizes what producer Dickinson calls in the liner notes, "recording the feeling in your soul while you're playing." © Robert Baird/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 9, 2020 | Epitaph

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Lament finds Touché Amoré in an interesting position. As a post-hardcore band five albums and 10-plus years into their career—and with their 20s in the rearview mirror—they're firmly on the page of the Rock Career Calendar indicating it's time to "mature" and "branch out" and "maybe let's try something a little more accessible." Add to that the fact that their last album, 2016's Phase Four was both their most emotionally riveting (with lyrics and intensity inspired by vocalist Jeremy Bolm's mother’s death from cancer) and sonically intricate, and you have a band primed to downshift and glide into punk rock middle age. Touché Amoré, however, decided instead to hire nü-metal icon Ross Robinson to produce their latest album. Now, whether or not this was driven by some perverse nostalgia is unclear, but the results of Robinson's precise and clarified approach to production redound greatly to the band's benefit, clearly delineating it from their previous Brad Wood-produced efforts. Lament is a wiry and intense album, but also full of dynamic range (both sonic and emotional). Bolm is still explosively emotional throughout, but his diaristic approach is more inclusive and empathetic here, especially on tracks like "Exit Row" and "Feign." And while the crisp, dry midtempo romp of "Reminders" (featuring Julien Baker, who also appeared on Stage Four) sounds almost joyous, it's still quite a melancholy and angry song. The album's other guest slot is on "Limelight," featuring verses from Andy Hull (Manchester Orchestra) and some steel guitar flourishes that could point the way to what an "adult" Touché Amoré would sound like. However, by the time "A Forecast" closes the album with its gentle piano/vocals opening that feels a bit self-abasing but blossoms into a melodramatic catharsis, you realize that the marginal evolution of Lament is exactly how a band like this moves into middle age: by playing to their strengths. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 2, 2020 | Memory Music

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 22, 2020 | Anti - Epitaph

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
The world changes. Fleet Foxes doesn’t. Which isn’t such a bad thing, seeing as Robin Pecknold and his hairy band members have mastered their craft. With this fourth album, coming fifteen years into their career, the sound is still the same for the Seattle-based harmonies-obsessed neo-folk group. Pecknold carries on the legacy of Crosby Stills Nash & Young, the Byrds and the Beach Boys on this album. More than he ever has before. But his distinguishable voice - and the almost spiritual reverb that surrounds it - is now a recognized and rather unique hallmark of his era. To prove he’s not a dictator, he hands the mic over to the young and little-known 21-year-old Uwade Akhere on the opening track Wading In Waist-High Water for a delicate and delicious antipasti. Though what follows, for the next hour, is pure Robin Pecknold. It’s a symphony that combines a solid Brian Wilson production with subtle songs with David Crosby-esque harmonic overtones (from the If I Could Only Remember My Name era, his crazy solo album). Shore doesn't change a thing. It simply comforts Fleet Foxes’ fans... and their foes at that. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released August 28, 2020 | EONE CANADA

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Jazz - Released August 21, 2020 | Concord Jazz

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music - Qobuzissime
Although this release is Nubya Garcia's first real solo album, the artist is accustomed to being showered with praise, awards, prizes, projects and collaborations. At 29 years old, the Londoner is undoubtedly one of the major players on the new British jazz scene and her colourful, full-bodied saxophone playing has already resonated on numerous recordings such as those of the groups Nérija and Maisha, and on two thirds of We Out Here (2018), the iconic compilation album from Gilles Peterson’s Brownswood label which united the big names on the contemporary scene. It is with some of these musicians that she has recorded Source. Joined by Joe Armon-Jones (keys), Daniel Casimir (bass) and Sam Jones (drums), Garcia was certainly well-equipped to push the boundaries of contemporary jazz and the UK music scene. As is often the case with contemporary UK musicians, Afro-Caribbean and urban sounds come to influence the rhythms as well as the melodies. Such a fusion is often present in UK jazz albums which also have their own unique flavours. The influence of Herbie Hancock (from the Headhunters period/early Columbia Records) is never far away (Inner Game, The Message Continues). This sensation is amplified by the funky playing of the organ and synth magician, Joe Armon-Jones.But Nubya Garcia is hungry for other sounds and landscapes. On the title track Source, the dub influence is clear. On Together is a Beautiful Place To Be, she deploys a delicate soul and R&B sensuality. Stand With Each Other slaloms between spellbinding nyabinghi rhythms while the aptly named La cumbia me està llamando leaves no doubt as to its influences… All of these sequences paint the picture of a woman well anchored in her time, a musician who is in harmony with her roots and history and puts the notion of collectiveness at the forefront of her artistry. Garcia's notable invitees include Richie Sievwright, Cassie Kinoshi and Sheila Maurice-Grey from the group Kokoroko, the Colombians of La Perla (La cambia me està llamando) as well as Chicago singer Akenya Seymour (Boundless Beings). With this Qobuzissime winning album, Nubya Garcia succeeds in going that little bit further and breaking down the walls that try to hold jazz back. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 17, 2020 | Fire Talk

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Electronic - Released July 10, 2020 | Ninja Tune

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
You only need to listen to a few seconds of Healing Is A Miracle to understand that Julianna Barwick’s albums contain the same amount of thoughtfulness that you’d find in a monastery. This American from Louisiana, who’s now based in Los Angeles after a long stint in Brooklyn, lets this dreamlike atmosphere seep into everything she composes. Wide soundscapes, infinite layers, loops and repetitive patterns immersed in halos of echo and reverb swirl around her fascinating voice which possesses a similar grace to Liz Fraser’s from the Cocteau Twins, despite hardly resembling it. The album is like an ethereal, hypnotic, suspended music session. It’s hardly surprising that Barwick has worked with Sigur Rós, among others… Jónsi from the Icelandic band features on In Light. The Californian electronic musician Nosaj Thing (on Nod) and the harpist Mary Lattimore (on Oh, Memory) are the two other guests on this fourth album, which, like previous records, is soaked in a half-New Age, half-ambient feel. Time is suspended. And so are we. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released June 26, 2020 | Virgin EMI

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Rock - Released June 19, 2020 | Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
Immediately contradicting the album's title, opener "I Contain Multitudes" finds Dylan doing his best Leonard Cohen: the lion in winter, growling with deceptively gentle gravitas over cinematic guitar—paying tribute to William Blake, Anne Frank, Indiana Jones and "them British bad boys the Rolling Stones." If it were to be the 79-year-old's last stand, it's a pretty damn great one. But he immediately springs to spirited life with "False Prophet," a no-frills dirty blues march. There are so many highlights: "My Own Version of You" is a laugh-out-loud "Frankenstein" tale set to a shadowy guitar prowl; the swooning "I've Made Up My Mind to Give Myself to You" borrows from doo-wop balladry. "I hope the gods go easy with me," Dylan croons on that track, and it's hard to shake the feeling that he's taking stock. But there's still so much to say. "Key West (Philosopher's Pilot)" finds the elder statesman chasing immortality along Route 1 for nine-and-a-half fully entertaining minutes, while closer "Murder Most Foul" stretches out for nearly 17, reliving the Kennedy assassination and incanting a phone book's worth of cultural-imprint references without wasting a second. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 18, 2020 | Dead Oceans

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Phoebe Bridgers has said she's a huge Elliott Smith fan—the name Punisher is a reference to an overzealous admirer, and the title track is about her love of the late singer-songwriter. You can hear his influence all over the album: the heartbreaking pathways of "Savior Complex"; the melody that drops down when you expect ascension on "Moon Song." But while Smith's lyrics could be clever, Bridgers' wordplay is unique. "The doctor put her hands over my liver/ She told me my resentment's getting smaller," she sings on "Garden Song." Not that she needs to hide behind jokes: "I've been running around in circles, pretending to be myself/Why would somebody do this on purpose when they could do something else?" she asks on "Chinese Satellite," the quiet instruments of the verses eventually erupting as if to shadow her feelings. There are other shadows at play, too: a male harmony haunting her light-as-air vocals on "Garden Song" and the otherwise ethereal "Halloween," and the specter of her father—she's spoken of his substance-abuse issues—darkening the lyrics of "Kyoto" even as Mellotron and amiable '90s drums provide aural sunshine. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 5, 2020 | Drakeo The Ruler

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Being behind bars has never stopped rappers from making music. But what Drakeo The Ruler (who has been incarcerated since 2018 on a murder charge) offers here, is quite out of the ordinary. From the Men’s Central Jail in Los Angeles, the Californian rapper had endless phone calls with his producer, JoogSZN, in which he rapped on top of instrumentals which JoogSZN had made him listen to in advance. And inevitably, his voice sounds like someone on the receiving end of a call, producing a rather unique and dark effect. Throughout the 19 tracks, Drakeo talks of fallen friends (R.I.P. Barney), prison (Social Media Can’t Help You) and the bleak tales that come along with it. With a very trap gang stand global aesthetic that occasionally develops elements of drill (Tell You The Truth), he manages to transform the obstacle of the telephone into an asset. On the other end of the line, JoogSZN places no effects on his voice so that the result is more street than ever, more pure. A success. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 3, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
In 2013, rapper El-P - the representative of independent New York rap (with Company Flow, then going solo and creating the label Definitive Jux) – joined up with Killer Mike, a solid street rapper from Atlanta who made a name for himself on OutKast’s debut album. Seven years and three albums later under the name Run The Jewels, the duo has not only become inseparable (and almost exclusive) but also an essential group on the contemporary rap scene. On RTJ4, the two forty-somethings continue to carry the torch for a noisy and rebellious rap inherited from Public Enemy. While the influence of the Bomb Squad, which was tangible even from their first productions in the mid-90s, is more present than ever, El-P stirs up his own sonic revolution and sets fire to all kinds of things by sampling the post-punk group Gang Of Four (the ground below), distinguishing himself over dancehall riddims (holy calamafuck, co-produced by Dave Sitek from TV On The Radio), recording Native American saxophonist Cochemea (a few words for the firing squad (radiation)) and bringing together big names as diverse as Pharrell Williams, Zack de La Rocha, Josh Homme, Mavis Staples and DJ Premier. Articulate and never overly wordy, the two rappers complement each other impressively in their timbres, their flows and their writing. El-P has retained from the golden age of indie rap a taste and talent for double entendres and witty punchlines, and Killer Mike, who in the civilian world has become one of the leading voices on the American left, alongside Bernie Sanders, manages the feat of putting social commentary back at the heart of rap. Being released in the midst of the public uprising in the United States following the death of George Floyd at the hands of the police, RTJ4 is like a real-time and inevitably icy autopsy of Trump's America. © Damien Besançon/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 15, 2020 | Matador

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
At first, Mike Hadreas aka Perfume Genius was likened to Anonhi/Antony Hegarty (Antony & The Johnsons). But as the American released more and more albums, it soon became clear that the universe he was building with his music was far too complex for such a superficial comparison. In 2014, his album Too Bright (co-produced by Adrian Utley from Portishead) gave us a kaleidoscope of sounds that went from Suicide-style electro that was sombre and minimalist to exuberant grandiosity and stopped off on the way for a R.E.M-style ballad. Three years later, No Shape also reflected that same personal eclecticism and Bowie-like musical androgyny. Now, Perfume Genius says his latest album, Set My Heart On Fire Immediately was influenced by his collaborative dance project with choreographer Kate Wallich, admitting, “It was dance that blew up this separation between my work and the world”. This realisation led him to reconsider his writing, which he now bases more on everyday life and real people, with influences from a wide range of artists from Townes Van Zandt and Enya to The Cocteau Twins! The album itself is just as diverse as it alternates unexpectedly between Baroque-style ballads and instrumental segments and his vocal palette paints all the colours of the rainbow as he moves from an angelic falsetto in one track to a guttural groan in the next. The soundscape is further enriched by the cello, glockenspiel, Wurlitzer, saxophone and harmonium in this rather elusive but sumptuous album. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 15, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Beck lent him his songwriting. Sufjan Stevens covered his songs. James Blake, Bon Iver, Flume and Andrew Bird invited him onto their albums. And Solange Knowles, St. Vincent and Erykah Badu hang out with him: Moses Sumney is a powerful and fascinating magnet. The futuristic soulman’s aura was confirmed in 2017 on his debut album Aromanticism, an impeccable work of lustful, intelligent R&B carried by a gospel-soaked voice and a strong yet troubled personality. Underscoring the duality of his daily life and his struggles with schizophrenia, Moses Sumney sees double with Græ. He has created this ambitious second album (released in two parts, three months apart) by dipping his brush into a wide-ranging palette: soul, pop, jazz, rock, R&B, folk. Even the title - neither black nor white - amplifies the feeling of being in-between...Now based in Asheville, North Carolina, the Californian (who lived in Accra, Ghana between the ages of 10 and 16) articulates ideas in two-headed sounds. His sexuality as his origins, his virility as his fragility, his falsetto as his hoarse voice, luxury as purity, acoustic guitar as synths, it’s all there. The first part is lyrical, grandiloquent and warm, bordering on baroque soul. The second is more peaceful and weightless. He flits from one thing to another with such ease that it’s never confusing or disorientating. As Sumney said in an interview, pop culture has made the patriarchy waver to the point that we forget masculinity is not necessarily a bad thing: Græ proves it in a whirlwind of eclecticism where his voice serves as a solid common thread. Like on Gagarin, where he revisits From Gagarins Point of View by E.S.T., the late Swedish jazz pianist Esbjörn Svensson’s trio. Or when he invites Jill Scott to sing (recite) the intro to jill/jack. James Blake and Daniel Lopatin a.k.a. Oneohtrix Point Never appear in this vast symphony, one so rich that you hear something new each time you listen. It would be too simplistic to consider Græ the album of Prince 2.0, since he feeds on a thousand sounds. In this grey area, Moses Sumney already has his own crown. And his reign has only just begun... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released May 8, 2020 | Blake Mills Artist JV 2017

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music