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Jazz - Released January 31, 2020 | ACT Music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released October 11, 2019 | Edition Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released October 4, 2019 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
With Walking Shadows in 2013, Joshua Redman submerged his saxophone in a beautiful orchestral arrangement by the composer Patrick Zimmerli. Six years later, we find the two men together again on Sun on Sand, a dense suite in which each movement is, according to their author Zimmerli, an “expression of light”. Redman is accompanied by the Brooklyn Rider Ensemble, bassist Scott Colley and percussionist Satoshi Takeishi. Together, they blur the boundaries between jazz and contemporary music thanks to an unusual combination of pieces by George Russell, Milton Babbitt, Michael Nyman and even Frank Zappa. The light found here comes in all kinds of tones. Going from chiaroscuro to bright sunlight, Joshua Redman and Patrick Zimmerli’s record is like a colour chart made up of very original shades. In 2019, orchestral jazz is far from being an over-crowded genre, so this excellent project deserves some attention. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released September 20, 2019 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Playing jazz that's "out" (meaning futuristic in a myriad of ways) is stylish and wins the respect of adventurous listeners. And yet it's also foolish to ignore artistic vision that's rooted in the wisdom of music history. After nearly two decades in The Bad Plus, Ethan Iverson left to pursue solo ventures like this quartet date recorded live in January 2017 at the Village Vanguard with the trumpeter Tom Harrell aboard. While there is little either cannot do musically—The Bad Plus has recorded covers from unlikely rock sources like Nirvana and Bowie while Harrell has shown interest in hip hop—here they settle into the well-worn groove of jazz standards with especially satisfying results. To emphasize the point that standards are never really mined out as a source of fresh interpretative insights, the foursome ease into a slow ruminative version of the Gershwin's "The Man I Love," where Harrell gives a moving, nakedly emotional performance. Instead of being the center of attention with showy solos, Iverson works as the crucial binding agent to these tightly knit quartet performances, tastefully supporting Harrell's remarkably compact solos in their opulent reading of "I Can't Get Started with You." Touches of modernity appear in Iverson's slightly off kilter intro to "Sentimental Journey." The rhythm section of bassist Ben Street and drummer Eric McPherson are pliant and potent on the slower numbers, adding a hard driving swing to Kern/Hammerstein's "All the Things You Are," and a full-on hard bop groove to "Wee." Tellingly, a pair of bluesy Iverson originals, "Philadelphia Creamer," and "Jed From Teaneck," fit seamlessly into this straight-ahead program devoted to what Iverson calls "reassessing jazz tradition and heritage." It’s a near perfect match of material and solo voices committed to a rewarding conversation. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Jazz - Released September 20, 2019 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released September 20, 2019 | ECM

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Playing jazz that's "out" (meaning futuristic in a myriad of ways) is stylish and wins the respect of adventurous listeners. And yet it's also foolish to ignore artistic vision that's rooted in the wisdom of music history. After nearly two decades in The Bad Plus, Ethan Iverson left to pursue solo ventures like this quartet date recorded live in January 2017 at the Village Vanguard with the trumpeter Tom Harrell aboard. While there is little either cannot do musically—The Bad Plus has recorded covers from unlikely rock sources like Nirvana and Bowie while Harrell has shown interest in hip hop—here they settle into the well-worn groove of jazz standards with especially satisfying results. To emphasize the point that standards are never really mined out as a source of fresh interpretative insights, the foursome ease into a slow ruminative version of the Gershwin's "The Man I Love," where Harrell gives a moving, nakedly emotional performance. Instead of being the center of attention with showy solos, Iverson works as the crucial binding agent to these tightly knit quartet performances, tastefully supporting Harrell's remarkably compact solos in their opulent reading of "I Can't Get Started with You." Touches of modernity appear in Iverson's slightly off kilter intro to "Sentimental Journey." The rhythm section of bassist Ben Street and drummer Eric McPherson are pliant and potent on the slower numbers, adding a hard driving swing to Kern/Hammerstein's "All the Things You Are," and a full-on hard bop groove to "Wee." Tellingly, a pair of bluesy Iverson originals, "Philadelphia Creamer," and "Jed From Teaneck," fit seamlessly into this straight-ahead program devoted to what Iverson calls "reassessing jazz tradition and heritage." It’s a near perfect match of material and solo voices committed to a rewarding conversation. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Jazz - Released September 20, 2019 | ECM

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released September 6, 2019 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Piano and trumpet duets are relatively rare. In 1928, while recording Weather Bird, Louis Armstrong and Earl Hines kicked things off, followed much later by Chet Baker and Paul Bley (with Diane in 1985), Tom Harrell and Jacky Terrasson (Moon and Sand in 1991), Martial Solal and Eric le Lann (Portrait in Black and White in 2000), Martial Solal and Dave Douglas (Rue de Seine in 2006), Uri Caine and Paolo Fresu (Things in 2006), Enrico Rava and Stefano Bollani (Rava Plays Rava in 1999 and The Third Man in 2007), Oscar Peterson on five albums (with Dizzy Gillespie, Roy Eldridge, Clark Terry, Jon Faddis and Harry “Sweets” Edison), Clark Terry’s One On One in 2000 (with fourteen different pianists!) and, most recently, Vijay Iyer and Wadada Leo Smith (A Cosmic Rhythm With Each Stroke in 2016)... Avishai Cohen and Yonathan Avishai have known each other since their teens in Tel Aviv. The pianist even featured on the trumpeter’s two ECM albums, Into the Silence and Cross My Palm With Silver. Their innate complicity allows them to improvise freely, playfully, and intensely on Playing the Room, their first work as a duo. As the title suggests, the two Israelis also incorporate the room – in this case the Auditorio Stelio Molo RSI studio in Lugano – into their sound and they make full use of its resonant acoustics. They each sign a theme in turn before embarking on an eclectic repertoire by John Coltrane (Cresent), Duke Ellington (Azalea), Abdullah Ibrahim (Kofifi Blue), Ornette Coleman (Dee Dee), Milt Jackson (Ralph’s New Blues), Alexander Argov (Shir Eres) and Stevie Wonder (Sir Duke). And they transform this heterogeneous programme into utterly moving chamber jazz. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released July 19, 2019 | Edition Records Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Classical - Released July 5, 2019 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released June 28, 2019 | RareNoiseRecords

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released June 21, 2019 | Intakt Records

Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released June 14, 2019 | ACT Music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released May 31, 2019 | ECM

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
In 1999, a year after Not Two, Not One, an ECM album which saw Paul Bley, Gary Peacock and Paul Motian reunite, the trio embarked on a big tour on both sides of the Atlantic. When Will the Blues Leave documents their brilliant concert at Lugano’s Aula Magna in Switzerland. As well as Ornette Coleman’s legendary theme which lends its name to the title, Bley and his counterparts share out the repertoire and also revisit Gershwin’s standard I Love You Porgy with all the originality that their strong personalities exude. Of course, the subtlety that each one brings to their playing, much like in the improvisations, makes this music even more perfect. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released June 14, 2019 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
ECM is used to going off-piste, and that’s exactly what they do here with Lost River. The project is led by drummer Michele Rabbia and guitarist Eivind Aarset, who have previously performed together as a duo. Rabbia has also collaborated with trombonist Gianluca Petrella, but this album is a first for the trio. As the brain behind the German label, it was Manfred Eicher’s idea to bring the three together. Composed largely from improvised sound textures, their music has the feel of an atmospheric symphony that’s speckled with electronic sounds. Like a distant relative to the renowned record Khmer - the album that Nils Petter Molvӕr released on ECM in 1998 - Lost Rivers plays on sensations, shapes and space. Everything is weightless - but never too fleeting - in this superb meditative jazz. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released June 14, 2019 | ECM

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
ECM is used to going off-piste, and that’s exactly what they do here with Lost River. The project is led by drummer Michele Rabbia and guitarist Eivind Aarset, who have previously performed together as a duo. Rabbia has also collaborated with trombonist Gianluca Petrella, but this album is a first for the trio. As the brain behind the German label, it was Manfred Eicher’s idea to bring the three together. Composed largely from improvised sound textures, their music has the feel of an atmospheric symphony that’s speckled with electronic sounds. Like a distant relative to the renowned record Khmer - the album that Nils Petter Molvӕr released on ECM in 1998 - Lost Rivers plays on sensations, shapes and space. Everything is weightless - but never too fleeting - in this superb meditative jazz. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Contemporary Jazz - Released May 17, 2019 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
It would not be fair to say that Brad Mehldau rests only on his laurels and sticks to what he knows. With Finding Gabriel, the American pianist delivers an ambitious and multifaceted record that blows open the conventions of jazz. Mehldau had previously co-released a very special album with drummer Mark Guiliana, Mehliana: Taming the Dragon in 2014, long before this more compact 2019 release. Above all, Finding Gabriel is the product of the pianists’ intense study of the Bible (it is the angel Gabriel’s name that is referenced in the title…). “I built up many of the tracks beginning with synths and Mark Guiliana on drums, in a process similar to our previous collaboration, Taming the Dragon. Layers were added, and the human voice became an important element—not with text, but as a pure expression of harmony and emotion.” From the offset, the record is an immediate shock. The result is a mystical and fascinating fusion of ideas. Behind his piano are the synths of engineers Dave Smith and Tom Oberheim Ob-6, his Fender Rhodes, percussion parts and, for the first time, a microphone. Mehldau unfolds a symphony of wind instruments, strings and electronica while dabbling in jazz fusion (one sometimes thinks of Metheny Group or Weather Report) in which the human voice takes on an essential role. The American pianist is however not the only one to sing on this record as singers Kurt Elling, Becca Stevens and Gabriel Kahane are all invited to join. Finally, in terms of guests, the record is joined by the violinist Sara Caswell, the trumpetist Ambrose Akinmusire, the saxophonists Joel Frahm, Charles Pillow and Christ Cheek and the flutist Michel Thomas. From start to finish, Brad Mehldau’s Finding Gabriel is a unique and spiritual odyssey that differs very much from his other piano trios. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released May 17, 2019 | Jazzhaus Records

Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released May 17, 2019 | Palmetto+

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released May 10, 2019 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz