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Deerhunter - Why Hasn't Everything Already Disappeared?

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Why Hasn't Everything Already Disappeared?

Deerhunter

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In 2015, two years after Monomania, Bradford Cox and his men signed off on Fading Frontier, a surprising seventh album that offered up new perspectives for Deerhunter. The Atlanta gang used to play muffled sonic pop with an impressive melodic mastery. A fascinating type of music inherited from My Bloody Valentine’s sound wall. This dreamlike rock was still more or less on the agenda with Fading Frontier but Cox leaned towards more purity, more melodies, and more pop, like on the frenetic and groovy single Snakeskin...

Four years later, Why Hasn't Everything Already Disappeared? proves that Deerhunter have not yet completed their metamorphosis. The richness of this eighth album, which is even further removed from the shoegaze spirit of their early days, shows that Bradford Cox's brain is still in turmoil. From the harpsichord of Death in Midsummer, reminiscent of The Kinks (as well as No One's Sleeping, which is also in the spirit of Ray Davies) to the futuristic/synthetic sound of Greenpoint Gothic (it's like David Bowie's Berlin period led by Brian Eno) and the exhilarating and catchy power pop of Futurism, the album dares to do just about everything. But that’s not to say that there’s no common thread. Bradford Cox, Lockett Pundt, Moses Archuleta, Josh McKay, Javier Morales and, as a guest on three tracks, Cate Le Bon always find a plan, a melody, a punchline, an atmosphere or an unexpected digression to impress their audience. Amazing and captivating. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

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Why Hasn't Everything Already Disappeared?

Deerhunter

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1
Death in Midsummer
00:04:22

Bradford Cox, Composer - Deerhunter, Artist, MainArtist - Beggars Music, MusicPublisher

2018 4AD Ltd 2018 4AD Ltd

2
No One's Sleeping
00:04:25

Bradford Cox, Composer - Deerhunter, Artist, MainArtist - Beggars Music, MusicPublisher

2018 4AD Ltd 2018 4AD Ltd

3
Greenpoint Gothic
00:02:02

Bradford Cox, Composer - Deerhunter, Artist, MainArtist - Beggars Music, MusicPublisher

2018 4AD Ltd 2018 4AD Ltd

4
Element
00:02:59

Bradford Cox, Composer - Deerhunter, Artist, MainArtist - Beggars Music, MusicPublisher

2018 4AD Ltd 2018 4AD Ltd

5
What Happens to People?
00:04:16

Bradford Cox, Composer - Deerhunter, Artist, MainArtist - Beggars Music, MusicPublisher

2018 4AD Ltd 2018 4AD Ltd

6
Détournement
00:03:25

Bradford Cox, Composer - Deerhunter, Artist, MainArtist - Beggars Music, MusicPublisher

2018 4AD Ltd 2018 4AD Ltd

7
Futurism
00:02:51

Bradford Cox, Composer - Deerhunter, Artist, MainArtist - Beggars Music, MusicPublisher

2018 4AD Ltd 2018 4AD Ltd

8
Tarnung
00:03:07

Lockett Pundt, Composer - Deerhunter, Artist, MainArtist - Beggars Music, MusicPublisher

2018 4AD Ltd 2018 4AD Ltd

9
Plains
00:02:13

Bradford Cox, Composer - Deerhunter, Artist, MainArtist - Beggars Music, MusicPublisher

2018 4AD Ltd 2018 4AD Ltd

10
Nocturne
00:06:24

Bradford Cox, Composer - Deerhunter, Artist, MainArtist - Beggars Music, MusicPublisher

2018 4AD Ltd 2018 4AD Ltd

Album Description

In 2015, two years after Monomania, Bradford Cox and his men signed off on Fading Frontier, a surprising seventh album that offered up new perspectives for Deerhunter. The Atlanta gang used to play muffled sonic pop with an impressive melodic mastery. A fascinating type of music inherited from My Bloody Valentine’s sound wall. This dreamlike rock was still more or less on the agenda with Fading Frontier but Cox leaned towards more purity, more melodies, and more pop, like on the frenetic and groovy single Snakeskin...

Four years later, Why Hasn't Everything Already Disappeared? proves that Deerhunter have not yet completed their metamorphosis. The richness of this eighth album, which is even further removed from the shoegaze spirit of their early days, shows that Bradford Cox's brain is still in turmoil. From the harpsichord of Death in Midsummer, reminiscent of The Kinks (as well as No One's Sleeping, which is also in the spirit of Ray Davies) to the futuristic/synthetic sound of Greenpoint Gothic (it's like David Bowie's Berlin period led by Brian Eno) and the exhilarating and catchy power pop of Futurism, the album dares to do just about everything. But that’s not to say that there’s no common thread. Bradford Cox, Lockett Pundt, Moses Archuleta, Josh McKay, Javier Morales and, as a guest on three tracks, Cate Le Bon always find a plan, a melody, a punchline, an atmosphere or an unexpected digression to impress their audience. Amazing and captivating. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

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