Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

La Luz - Weirdo Shrine

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Weirdo Shrine

La Luz

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

La Luz are clearly not afraid to mix things up, taking the reverb-soaked guitars of vintage surf rock, the harmonies of '60s girl group pop, and the simple, revved-up melodies of first-generation garage rock and twisting them together into a sound that miraculously stays true to its influences without sounding like the musicians are struggling to live in the past. La Luz aren't trading in irony or misplaced nostalgia on their second long-player, 2015's Weirdo Shrine -- they've simply appropriated bits and pieces of rock & roll's past the way a kid might build a hot rod out of scattered parts found at a junkyard, and like that hot rod the band has created something that runs like a top and has a personality and swagger all its own regardless of how it was put together. While producer and engineer Ty Segall might have been expected to add some of his own speaker-blowing psychedelia to La Luz's formula on Weirdo Shrine, he's clearly put his own ego on the back burner at the service of the band's own approach, and he's given Weirdo Shrine a sound that's tight and uncluttered but also captures the energy and space of a live performance. The interplay between guitarist and lead vocalist Shana Cleveland, bassist Lena Simon, keyboardist Alice Sandahl, and drummer Marian Li Pino is excellent, just loose enough to suit the often languid mood of the surf-influenced tunes but tight enough to deliver when the band cranks up the amps and makes with the rock. And if the vocals are further back in the mix on Weirdo Shrine than they were on 2013's It's Alive (which was already a bit murky), making it hard to tell just what Cleveland is here to tell us, the harmonies are executed with skill, and the overall vibe is smart without forcing any particular issue. Weirdo Shrine shows La Luz are more than living up to the promise of their early work, and that they're still one of the most interesting and entertaining acts on the Pacific Northwest scene in 2015.
© Mark Deming /TiVo

More info

Weirdo Shrine

La Luz

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Sleep Till They Die
00:03:20

La Luz, MainArtist

2015 Hardly Art 2015 Hardly Art

2
You Disappear
00:03:23

La Luz, MainArtist

2015 Hardly Art 2015 Hardly Art

3
With Davey
00:02:18

La Luz, MainArtist

2015 Hardly Art 2015 Hardly Art

4
Don't Wanna Be Anywhere
00:03:01

La Luz, MainArtist

2015 Hardly Art 2015 Hardly Art

5
I Can't Speak
00:03:03

La Luz, MainArtist

2015 Hardly Art 2015 Hardly Art

6
Hey Papi
00:01:47

La Luz, MainArtist

2015 Hardly Art 2015 Hardly Art

7
I Wanna Be Alone (With You)
00:02:16

La Luz, MainArtist

2015 Hardly Art 2015 Hardly Art

8
I'll Be True
00:03:29

La Luz, MainArtist

2015 Hardly Art 2015 Hardly Art

9
Black Hole, Weirdo Shrine
00:03:04

La Luz, MainArtist

2015 Hardly Art 2015 Hardly Art

10
Oranges
00:02:11

La Luz, MainArtist

2015 Hardly Art 2015 Hardly Art

11
True Love Knows
00:03:36

La Luz, MainArtist

2015 Hardly Art 2015 Hardly Art

Album Description

La Luz are clearly not afraid to mix things up, taking the reverb-soaked guitars of vintage surf rock, the harmonies of '60s girl group pop, and the simple, revved-up melodies of first-generation garage rock and twisting them together into a sound that miraculously stays true to its influences without sounding like the musicians are struggling to live in the past. La Luz aren't trading in irony or misplaced nostalgia on their second long-player, 2015's Weirdo Shrine -- they've simply appropriated bits and pieces of rock & roll's past the way a kid might build a hot rod out of scattered parts found at a junkyard, and like that hot rod the band has created something that runs like a top and has a personality and swagger all its own regardless of how it was put together. While producer and engineer Ty Segall might have been expected to add some of his own speaker-blowing psychedelia to La Luz's formula on Weirdo Shrine, he's clearly put his own ego on the back burner at the service of the band's own approach, and he's given Weirdo Shrine a sound that's tight and uncluttered but also captures the energy and space of a live performance. The interplay between guitarist and lead vocalist Shana Cleveland, bassist Lena Simon, keyboardist Alice Sandahl, and drummer Marian Li Pino is excellent, just loose enough to suit the often languid mood of the surf-influenced tunes but tight enough to deliver when the band cranks up the amps and makes with the rock. And if the vocals are further back in the mix on Weirdo Shrine than they were on 2013's It's Alive (which was already a bit murky), making it hard to tell just what Cleveland is here to tell us, the harmonies are executed with skill, and the overall vibe is smart without forcing any particular issue. Weirdo Shrine shows La Luz are more than living up to the promise of their early work, and that they're still one of the most interesting and entertaining acts on the Pacific Northwest scene in 2015.
© Mark Deming /TiVo

About the album

Distinctions:

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Nevermind

Nirvana

Nevermind Nirvana

Speak No Evil

Wayne Shorter

Speak No Evil Wayne Shorter

Tubular Bells

Mike Oldfield

Tubular Bells Mike Oldfield

Hamilton. An American Musical

Various Artists

More on Qobuz
By La Luz

La Luz

La Luz

La Luz La Luz

Floating Features

La Luz

Damp Face EP

La Luz

Damp Face EP La Luz

In the Country

La Luz

Metal Man

La Luz

Metal Man La Luz
You may also like...

Solar Power

Lorde

Solar Power Lorde

Happier Than Ever (Explicit)

Billie Eilish

evermore (Explicit)

Taylor Swift

evermore (Explicit) Taylor Swift

WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?

Billie Eilish

Idiot Prayer - Nick Cave Alone at Alexandra Palace

Nick Cave

In your panoramas...
A Guide to Five Lesser-Known Metal Subgenres

The great oak tree of heavy metal contains more than meets the eye. Its mighty branches, visible to the average rock fan, consist of thrash, hair, nu, black, 'core, and death metal—all arguably the genre's more iconic iterations. But beneath its tremendous trunk are ever-growing roots that stretch endlessly into a vast underground of niche stylistic offshoots. There are literally dozens of subgenres—and many subgenres within those subgenres—throughout the heavy metal lexicon, and it would take a lifetime to become fully versed in all of them. Here we zoom in on five unique and compelling lesser-known metal subgenres that aren't obvious entry points for the average headbanger, but every fan of aggressive music should be familiar with these sounds.

The Black Keys in 10 Songs

From 2001, The Black Keys have been reminding the world about the real roots of the Blues, cutting away all the frills and unnecessary solos. Their music has always been untamed, abrupt and minimalist. Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney developed this unique style over the course of two decades, without once selling their souls to the devil at a Mississippi crossroads. Here are ten songs to prove it.

The Dark Side of the Moon: An Astronomical Success

Pink Floyd's ground-breaking album The Dark Side of the Moon was the result of a long creative process that began around 1968. A Saucerful of Secrets (the main track from the eponymous album) was, for Nick Mason at least, where it all began. Their next album Ummagumma (1969) gave each band member the opportunity to create a solo piece, though they would have to combine their talents if they wanted to hit the jackpot. Pink Floyd continued to search for the perfect record with Meddle, an album which highlighted their skills in the studio, and Atom Heart Mother, before they reached nirvana with The Dark Side of the Moon. And the album’s perfection hasn’t faded one bit.

In the news...