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The Ting Tings|We Started Nothing

We Started Nothing

The Ting Tings

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On the Ting Tings' debut album, We Started Nothing, the duo's new wave-worshiping mix of dance and indie pop -- which grafts chugging guitar and bashed drums onto looping structures and proudly plastic keyboards -- is polished, but far from polite. Singer/guitarist Katie White's snotty, singsong vocal delivery and flat rhymes are part cheerleader, part playground chant, and a tiny bit of punk snarl; "That's Not My Name," on which White sneers "Are you calling me darling? Are you calling me bird?," even sounds a little like riot grrrl sloganeering filtered through a decade's worth of pop. Even when White sings more melodically, as on "Traffic Light" and "We Walk," the energy, attitude, and repetition can be grating, even if you're tapping your foot to the songs. However, the Ting Tings manage to stay on the catchy side with "Fruit Machine," a Lily Allen-ish bit of cheeky bordering on vindictive pop, and on "Keep Your Head" and "Be the One," which tone down the Ting Tings' energy to more manageable but still lively levels. "Great DJ" and "Shut Up and Let Me Go" (which sounds like a Yeah Yeah Yeahs parody/tribute) are also standouts, and it's no surprise they've been used in commercials -- they're so short and memorable, they feel like jingles waiting for products to endorse. Since they've got a real knack for writing songs that stick in your head whether you want them to or not, the Ting Tings' songs are fun in very small doses.
© Heather Phares /TiVo

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We Started Nothing

The Ting Tings

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1
Great DJ
00:03:22

Greg Gordon, Mixing Engineer - Julian de Martino, Producer - Julian de Martino, Lyricist - Julian de Martino, Composer - The Ting Tings, Performer - Dave Sardy, Mixing Engineer - Andy Brohard, Mixing Engineer - Katie White, Lyricist - Katie White, Composer

(P) 2007 Sony Music Entertainment UK Limited

2
That's Not My Name
00:05:10

Greg Gordon, Engineer - Julian de Martino, Lyricist - Julian de Martino, Composer - The Ting Tings, Producer - The Ting Tings, Performer - Dave Sardy, Mixing Engineer - Katie White, Lyricist - Katie White, Composer

(P) 2008 Sony Music Entertainment UK Limited

3
Fruit Machine
00:02:52

Greg Gordon, Engineer - Julian de Martino, Lyricist - Julian de Martino, Composer - The Ting Tings, Producer - The Ting Tings, Performer - Dave Sardy, Mixing Engineer - Katie White, Lyricist - Katie White, Composer

(P) 2008 Sony Music Entertainment UK Limited

4
Traffic Light
00:02:57

Greg Gordon, Engineer - Julian de Martino, Lyricist - Julian de Martino, Composer - The Ting Tings, Producer - The Ting Tings, Performer - Dave Sardy, Mixing Engineer - Katie White, Lyricist - Katie White, Composer

(P) 2008 Sony Music Entertainment UK Limited

5
Shut Up and Let Me Go
00:02:51

Greg Gordon, Mixing Engineer - Julian de Martino, Lyricist - Julian de Martino, Composer - The Ting Tings, Producer - The Ting Tings, Performer - Dave Sardy, Mixing Engineer - Andy Brohard, Mixing Engineer - Katie White, Composer - Katie White, Lyricist

(P) 2008 Sony Music Entertainment UK Limited

6
Keep Your Head
00:03:22

Greg Gordon, Engineer - Julian de Martino, Lyricist - Julian de Martino, Composer - The Ting Tings, Producer - The Ting Tings, Performer - Dave Sardy, Mixing Engineer - Katie White, Lyricist - Katie White, Composer

(P) 2008 Sony Music Entertainment UK Limited

7
Be the One
00:02:56

Greg Gordon, Mixing Engineer - The Ting Tings, Producer - The Ting Tings, Performer - Julian de Martino, Lyricist - Julian de Martino, Composer - Dave Sardy, Mixing Engineer - Andy Brohard, Mixing Engineer - Katie White, Lyricist - Katie White, Composer

(P) 2008 Sony Music Entertainment UK Limited

8
We Walk
00:04:04

Greg Gordon, Engineer - Julian de Martino, Lyricist - Julian de Martino, Composer - The Ting Tings, Producer - The Ting Tings, Performer - Dave Sardy, Mixing Engineer - Katie White, Lyricist - Katie White, Composer

(P) 2008 Sony Music Entertainment UK Limited

9
Impacilla Carpisung
00:03:39

Greg Gordon, Mixing Engineer - The Ting Tings, Producer - The Ting Tings, Performer - Julian de Martino, Lyricist - Julian de Martino, Composer - Dave Sardy, Mixing Engineer - Andy Brohard, Mixing Engineer - Katie White, Lyricist - Katie White, Composer

(P) 2008 Sony Music Entertainment UK Limited

10
We Started Nothing
00:06:22

Greg Gordon, Mixing Engineer - The Ting Tings, Producer - The Ting Tings, Performer - Julian de Martino, Lyricist - Julian de Martino, Composer - Dave Sardy, Mixing Engineer - Andy Brohard, Mixing Engineer - Katie White, Lyricist - Katie White, Composer

(P) 2008 Sony Music Entertainment UK Limited

Album Description

On the Ting Tings' debut album, We Started Nothing, the duo's new wave-worshiping mix of dance and indie pop -- which grafts chugging guitar and bashed drums onto looping structures and proudly plastic keyboards -- is polished, but far from polite. Singer/guitarist Katie White's snotty, singsong vocal delivery and flat rhymes are part cheerleader, part playground chant, and a tiny bit of punk snarl; "That's Not My Name," on which White sneers "Are you calling me darling? Are you calling me bird?," even sounds a little like riot grrrl sloganeering filtered through a decade's worth of pop. Even when White sings more melodically, as on "Traffic Light" and "We Walk," the energy, attitude, and repetition can be grating, even if you're tapping your foot to the songs. However, the Ting Tings manage to stay on the catchy side with "Fruit Machine," a Lily Allen-ish bit of cheeky bordering on vindictive pop, and on "Keep Your Head" and "Be the One," which tone down the Ting Tings' energy to more manageable but still lively levels. "Great DJ" and "Shut Up and Let Me Go" (which sounds like a Yeah Yeah Yeahs parody/tribute) are also standouts, and it's no surprise they've been used in commercials -- they're so short and memorable, they feel like jingles waiting for products to endorse. Since they've got a real knack for writing songs that stick in your head whether you want them to or not, the Ting Tings' songs are fun in very small doses.
© Heather Phares /TiVo

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