Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Coralie Clément|Toystore (Coralie Clément)

Toystore (Coralie Clément)

Coralie Clément

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

Coralie Clément's third album, 2009's Toystore, takes the singer's winsomeness and delicacy to a whole new level. As the title implies, this album is brimming with cutie-pie instrumentation (toy Farfisas, glockenspiels, and ukuleles, just to name a few); it's the kind of thing that brings to mind Cake on Cake, Yann Tiersen (particularly his work for the movie Amelie), and Detektivbyrån. Benjamin Biolay's arrangements, intricate as clockwork, mingle pleasantly with Clément's romantic, wistful vocals. On the surface the instrumentation might seem simple and childlike, but Biolay manages to work a good helping of darkness, even malevolence, into the twinkling sounds of these diminutive instruments, and it results in some puckish, charming-as-heck music. "C'est la Vie," "So Long Babylon," and "Sono Io" are dark in the way a fairy tale or a marionette show can be dark; the syrupy-sweet materials belie the darkness and complexity stirring beneath the surface. There are a few moments when this sugariness becomes tad cloying -- one track in particular, "Je Ne Sens Plus Ton Amour," a cabaret-style piano-driven duet featuring Etienne Daho, is a bit too soggy-sweet, like cake soaked in sweetened condensed milk. Surprisingly, this has less to do with the toy instruments than it does with the piano arrangement and the overripe production; Clément and Daho sound a bit too slick and theatrical here. Toystore probably won't be remembered as one of Clément's best albums, seeing as it sounds so cute it's almost kooky. Still, it's an interesting, and well-made, detour from the chic, windswept, and wistful fare found on her previous two albums.
© Margaret Reges /TiVo

More info

Toystore (Coralie Clément)

Coralie Clément

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
L'Effet Jokari
00:02:56

Coralie Clement, Performer

2008 Discograph

2
C'est la Vie
00:02:26

Coralie Clement, Performer

2008 Discograph

3
Share the Day
00:02:53

Coralie Clement, Performer

2008 Discograph

4
Le Baiser Permanent
00:02:00

Coralie Clement, Performer

2008 Discograph

5
Je Ne Sens Plus Ton Amour (feat. Etienne Daho)
00:03:45

Coralie Clement, Performer - Etienne Daho, Featuring

2008 Discograph

6
Sono Io
00:03:11

Coralie Clement, Performer

2008 Discograph

7
On Etait Bien
00:02:51

Coralie Clement, Performer

2008 Discograph

8
Houlala
00:02:24

Coralie Clement, Performer

2008 Discograph

9
La Reine des Pommes
00:02:39

Coralie Clement, Performer

2008 Discograph

10
Paris Dix Heures du Soir
00:03:04

Coralie Clement, Performer

2008 Discograph

11
So Long Babylone
00:03:17

Coralie Clement, Performer

2008 Discograph

12
Tu Seras à Moi
00:03:20

Coralie Clement, Performer

2008 Discograph

Album Description

Coralie Clément's third album, 2009's Toystore, takes the singer's winsomeness and delicacy to a whole new level. As the title implies, this album is brimming with cutie-pie instrumentation (toy Farfisas, glockenspiels, and ukuleles, just to name a few); it's the kind of thing that brings to mind Cake on Cake, Yann Tiersen (particularly his work for the movie Amelie), and Detektivbyrån. Benjamin Biolay's arrangements, intricate as clockwork, mingle pleasantly with Clément's romantic, wistful vocals. On the surface the instrumentation might seem simple and childlike, but Biolay manages to work a good helping of darkness, even malevolence, into the twinkling sounds of these diminutive instruments, and it results in some puckish, charming-as-heck music. "C'est la Vie," "So Long Babylon," and "Sono Io" are dark in the way a fairy tale or a marionette show can be dark; the syrupy-sweet materials belie the darkness and complexity stirring beneath the surface. There are a few moments when this sugariness becomes tad cloying -- one track in particular, "Je Ne Sens Plus Ton Amour," a cabaret-style piano-driven duet featuring Etienne Daho, is a bit too soggy-sweet, like cake soaked in sweetened condensed milk. Surprisingly, this has less to do with the toy instruments than it does with the piano arrangement and the overripe production; Clément and Daho sound a bit too slick and theatrical here. Toystore probably won't be remembered as one of Clément's best albums, seeing as it sounds so cute it's almost kooky. Still, it's an interesting, and well-made, detour from the chic, windswept, and wistful fare found on her previous two albums.
© Margaret Reges /TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Nevermind

Nirvana

Nevermind Nirvana

Back To Black

Amy Winehouse

Back To Black Amy Winehouse

Legend – The Best Of Bob Marley & The Wailers

Bob Marley & The Wailers

Songs From The Big Chair

Tears For Fears

Songs From The Big Chair Tears For Fears
More on Qobuz
By Coralie Clément

La belle Affaire

Coralie Clément

La belle Affaire Coralie Clément

Salle des pas perdus

Coralie Clément

Salle des pas perdus Coralie Clément

Toystore

Coralie Clément

Toystore Coralie Clément

C'est La Vie

Coralie Clément

C'est La Vie Coralie Clément

Toystore

Coralie Clément

Toystore Coralie Clément

Playlists

You may also like...

L’enfer

Stromae

L’enfer Stromae

Cœur

Clara Luciani

Cœur Clara Luciani

Sous un soleil énorme

Bernard Lavilliers

Sous un soleil énorme Bernard Lavilliers

Nonante-Cinq

Angèle

Nonante-Cinq Angèle

Brûler le feu

Juliette Armanet

Brûler le feu Juliette Armanet
In your panoramas...
WES SIDE STORIES: The best musical moments in Wes Anderson’s films

Anderson's films can be polarizing: Charming or cloying, depending on your point of view. But if you're a fan, you no doubt appreciate the director's (and frequent collaborator, music supervisor Randall Poster's) obvious love of music—some of it as well known as Paul Simon or the frequently used Rolling Stones; some of it if-you-know-you-know cult classics.

Bossa nova, the Eternal Wave

Since its creation in the late 1950s, Bossa-nova has become an indispensable part of Brazilian music. The style’s strong evocative power won over artists from all around the world and earned recognition for many first-rate musicians whose works are now seen as classics.

Lhasa, An Unforgettable Shooting Star

With only three studio albums, one live album and three international tours, “Lhasa” de Sela still made her unique mark on contemporary popular music. “La Llorona”, “The Living Road” and “Lhasa” are all accomplished works in their own right and open the door to a strange yet familiar world, halfway between dream and reality. Full of both light and darkness, these songs are imbued with the genuine feelings of an artist whose heartfelt vocals reach out and pull the listener in, creating an intimate relationship with the audience. Looking back at the life of “Lhasa” de Sela, the makings of a legend are visible like chapters in a novel, complete with all the emotion that comes with a beautiful but heartbreaking storyline.

In the news...