Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

George Benson - The Shape Of Things To Come

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

The Shape Of Things To Come

George Benson

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

This A&M/CTI debut album by George Benson signaled the arrival of a true star in the jazz scene. Creed Taylor signed Benson immediately after Wes Montgomery's passing in 1968 -- he was being groomed for it by Verve's house producer, Esmond Edwards, and arranger, Tom McIntosh, before he ever came to CTI. Taylor paired Benson with arranger Don Sebesky (who had done plenty of work on Montgomery's A&M sides) and engineer Rudy Van Gelder. Herbie Hancock and Ron Carter (both members of the Miles Davis Quintet with whom Benson had guested earlier that year), bassist Richard Davis, and pianist Hank Jones were all guests. Benson's core band for these dates included organist Charlie Covington, drummer Leo Morris, and conguero Johnny Pacheco. The usual strings, supplemental horns, and backing voices in certain places (all Sebesky trademarks) are in place as well. All the stuff is here for Benson to fit neatly into the Montgomery mold -- except for one thing: Benson is a strong-willed artist. He wasn't going anywhere he didn't want to go and insisted on a certain amount of control on the date, and it's all for the better. This is one steamy little album that starts innocently enough with a lithe soul-jazz tune called "Footin' It," written by Benson and Sebesky. The flutes and cellos answer the head played by Benson. The strings fall in exotically as Benson begins to stretch and Covington answers with funk. Benson's guitar is not as smooth as Montgomery's; there is a defined edge in it and it's deep in the cut. Another interesting move was an experiment by Benson to use the Varitone device with Les Paul-like variable speed overdubs on his guitar. Covington alternately talks back and drones as Davis digs hard into the changes and keeps it simple but pronounced. Pacheco, like Benson, just goes nuts. By the time the strings and flute enter near the end your mind is already blown. Barry Mann wrote the cut as the theme song for a teensploitation flick called Wild in the Streets, and it was performed by Davie Allan & the Arrows. Benson turns it into a solid psychedelic soul-jazz number -- no grooves get lost; they just get under your skin. And so it goes through this set, from the radical revision of "Chattanooga Choo Choo" to Teddy White and Aretha Franklin's "Don't Let Me Lose This Dream," a sweeping, slightly Latinized soul number given full jazz treatment -- the only facsimile concession that Benson makes to the Montgomery memory on the disc. Sebesky's huge brass arrangements pump the tune into something really progressive and tight. Covington soars on it as well, but leaves plenty of space for Benson's righteous solo. Benson contributes his own nocturnal jazzy blues with "Shape of Things That Are and Were," as if to say "I'm not Wes; that was yesterday." Sebesky's horn chart is punchy and underscores the blues in the tune, and the guitarist plays a killer solo in a relaxed, open manner, seducing the listener for the closer. Introduced by a lonesome, blues-drenched harmonica playing solo, as if in a freight yard, Benson and Sebesky turn in a funky jazz rave-up of Boyce & Hart's hit "Last Train to Clarksville." Other than the overly familiar melody line, this cut just takes off, with big bright horns, Morris double-timing the band, Carter half-timing it, and Benson digging into both multi-string chord leads and single-string leads that he twins with Covington's organ about halfway through his break -- this is the sendoff this brilliant album deserves. Shape of Things to Come is the true signal of Benson's arrival, not only as a major soloist, but as an artist who refuses to be pinned down four decades later. He's a pop star, a genius guitarist, a singer, a songwriter, and even now his own man. This is an album that deserves its classic status and wears it well these many years later.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

More info

The Shape Of Things To Come

George Benson

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Footin' It
00:04:22

Don Sebesky, Recording Arranger, AssociatedPerformer - George Ricci, Cello, AssociatedPerformer - Romeo Penque, Flute, AssociatedPerformer - Wayne Andre, Trombone, AssociatedPerformer - Alan Raph, Horn, Tuba, AssociatedPerformer - Marvin Stamm, Flugelhorn, Piccolo, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Buddy Lucas, Saxophone, Harmonica, AssociatedPerformer - George Benson, Guitar, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Rudy Van Gelder, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - George Marge, Flute, AssociatedPerformer - Johnny Pacheco, Conga, AssociatedPerformer - Jack Jennings, Vibraphone, AssociatedPerformer - Donald John Sebesky, ComposerLyricist - Joe Shepley, Flugelhorn, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Leo Morris, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Creed Taylor, Producer - David Mankovitz, Viola, AssociatedPerformer - Charles Covington, Organ, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 1968 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

2
Face It Boy It's Over
00:04:04

Don Sebesky, Recording Arranger, AssociatedPerformer - Wayne Andre, Trombone, AssociatedPerformer - Alan Raph, Horn, Tuba, AssociatedPerformer - Marvin Stamm, Flugelhorn, Piccolo, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Buddy Lucas, Saxophone, Harmonica, AssociatedPerformer - George Benson, Guitar, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Rudy Van Gelder, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Johnny Pacheco, Conga, AssociatedPerformer - Joe Shepley, Flugelhorn, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Leo Morris, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Creed Taylor, Producer - Andy Bedale, ComposerLyricist - Francis Stanton Hayward, ComposerLyricist - Charles Covington, Organ, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 1968 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

3
Shape Of Things To Come
00:05:14

Wayne Andre, Trombone, AssociatedPerformer - Alan Raph, Horn, Tuba, AssociatedPerformer - Barry Mann, ComposerLyricist - Marvin Stamm, Flugelhorn, Piccolo, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Cynthia Weil, ComposerLyricist - Buddy Lucas, Saxophone, Harmonica, AssociatedPerformer - George Benson, Guitar, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Rudy Van Gelder, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Johnny Pacheco, Conga, AssociatedPerformer - Donald John Sebesky, Recording Arranger, AssociatedPerformer - Joe Shepley, Flugelhorn, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Leo Morris, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Creed Taylor, Producer - Charles Covington, Organ, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 1968 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

4
Chattanooga Choo Choo
00:03:33

Don Sebesky, Recording Arranger, AssociatedPerformer - George Ricci, Cello, AssociatedPerformer - Romeo Penque, Flute, AssociatedPerformer - Wayne Andre, Trombone, AssociatedPerformer - Alan Raph, Horn, Tuba, AssociatedPerformer - Marvin Stamm, Flugelhorn, Piccolo, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Buddy Lucas, Saxophone, Harmonica, AssociatedPerformer - George Benson, Guitar, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Harry Warren, ComposerLyricist - Mack Gordon, ComposerLyricist - Rudy Van Gelder, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - George Marge, Flute, AssociatedPerformer - Johnny Pacheco, Conga, AssociatedPerformer - Jack Jennings, Vibraphone, AssociatedPerformer - Joe Shepley, Flugelhorn, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Leo Morris, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Creed Taylor, Producer - David Mankovitz, Viola, AssociatedPerformer - Charles Covington, Organ, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 1968 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

5
Don't Let Me Lose This Dream
00:04:41

Wayne Andre, Trombone, AssociatedPerformer - Alan Raph, Horn, Tuba, AssociatedPerformer - Aretha Franklin, ComposerLyricist - Marvin Stamm, Flugelhorn, Piccolo, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Ted White, ComposerLyricist - Buddy Lucas, Saxophone, Harmonica, AssociatedPerformer - George Benson, Guitar, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Rudy Van Gelder, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Johnny Pacheco, Conga, AssociatedPerformer - Donald John Sebesky, Recording Arranger, AssociatedPerformer - Joe Shepley, Flugelhorn, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Leo Morris, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Creed Taylor, Producer - Charles Covington, Organ, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 1968 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

6
Shape Of Things That Are And Were
00:05:47

Wayne Andre, Trombone, AssociatedPerformer - Alan Raph, Horn, Tuba, AssociatedPerformer - Marvin Stamm, Flugelhorn, Piccolo, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Buddy Lucas, Saxophone, Harmonica, AssociatedPerformer - George Benson, Guitar, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Rudy Van Gelder, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Johnny Pacheco, Conga, AssociatedPerformer - Donald John Sebesky, Recording Arranger, AssociatedPerformer - Joe Shepley, Flugelhorn, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Leo Morris, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Creed Taylor, Producer - Charles Covington, Organ, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 1968 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

7
Last Train To Clarksville
00:05:32

Bobby Hart, ComposerLyricist - Wayne Andre, Trombone, AssociatedPerformer - Alan Raph, Horn, Tuba, AssociatedPerformer - Marvin Stamm, Flugelhorn, Piccolo, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Buddy Lucas, Saxophone, Harmonica, AssociatedPerformer - George Benson, Guitar, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Rudy Van Gelder, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Johnny Pacheco, Conga, AssociatedPerformer - Donald John Sebesky, Recording Arranger, AssociatedPerformer - Thomas Sidney Boyce, ComposerLyricist - Joe Shepley, Flugelhorn, Trumpet, AssociatedPerformer - Leo Morris, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Creed Taylor, Producer - Charles Covington, Organ, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 1968 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

Album Description

This A&M/CTI debut album by George Benson signaled the arrival of a true star in the jazz scene. Creed Taylor signed Benson immediately after Wes Montgomery's passing in 1968 -- he was being groomed for it by Verve's house producer, Esmond Edwards, and arranger, Tom McIntosh, before he ever came to CTI. Taylor paired Benson with arranger Don Sebesky (who had done plenty of work on Montgomery's A&M sides) and engineer Rudy Van Gelder. Herbie Hancock and Ron Carter (both members of the Miles Davis Quintet with whom Benson had guested earlier that year), bassist Richard Davis, and pianist Hank Jones were all guests. Benson's core band for these dates included organist Charlie Covington, drummer Leo Morris, and conguero Johnny Pacheco. The usual strings, supplemental horns, and backing voices in certain places (all Sebesky trademarks) are in place as well. All the stuff is here for Benson to fit neatly into the Montgomery mold -- except for one thing: Benson is a strong-willed artist. He wasn't going anywhere he didn't want to go and insisted on a certain amount of control on the date, and it's all for the better. This is one steamy little album that starts innocently enough with a lithe soul-jazz tune called "Footin' It," written by Benson and Sebesky. The flutes and cellos answer the head played by Benson. The strings fall in exotically as Benson begins to stretch and Covington answers with funk. Benson's guitar is not as smooth as Montgomery's; there is a defined edge in it and it's deep in the cut. Another interesting move was an experiment by Benson to use the Varitone device with Les Paul-like variable speed overdubs on his guitar. Covington alternately talks back and drones as Davis digs hard into the changes and keeps it simple but pronounced. Pacheco, like Benson, just goes nuts. By the time the strings and flute enter near the end your mind is already blown. Barry Mann wrote the cut as the theme song for a teensploitation flick called Wild in the Streets, and it was performed by Davie Allan & the Arrows. Benson turns it into a solid psychedelic soul-jazz number -- no grooves get lost; they just get under your skin. And so it goes through this set, from the radical revision of "Chattanooga Choo Choo" to Teddy White and Aretha Franklin's "Don't Let Me Lose This Dream," a sweeping, slightly Latinized soul number given full jazz treatment -- the only facsimile concession that Benson makes to the Montgomery memory on the disc. Sebesky's huge brass arrangements pump the tune into something really progressive and tight. Covington soars on it as well, but leaves plenty of space for Benson's righteous solo. Benson contributes his own nocturnal jazzy blues with "Shape of Things That Are and Were," as if to say "I'm not Wes; that was yesterday." Sebesky's horn chart is punchy and underscores the blues in the tune, and the guitarist plays a killer solo in a relaxed, open manner, seducing the listener for the closer. Introduced by a lonesome, blues-drenched harmonica playing solo, as if in a freight yard, Benson and Sebesky turn in a funky jazz rave-up of Boyce & Hart's hit "Last Train to Clarksville." Other than the overly familiar melody line, this cut just takes off, with big bright horns, Morris double-timing the band, Carter half-timing it, and Benson digging into both multi-string chord leads and single-string leads that he twins with Covington's organ about halfway through his break -- this is the sendoff this brilliant album deserves. Shape of Things to Come is the true signal of Benson's arrival, not only as a major soloist, but as an artist who refuses to be pinned down four decades later. He's a pop star, a genius guitarist, a singer, a songwriter, and even now his own man. This is an album that deserves its classic status and wears it well these many years later.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

About the album

Distinctions:

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Idle Moments

Grant Green

Idle Moments Grant Green

I Want To Hold Your Hand

Grant Green

Green Street

Grant Green

Green Street Grant Green

A Rush of Blood to the Head

Coldplay

More on Qobuz
By George Benson

Weekend in London (Live)

George Benson

Weekend in London (Live) George Benson

Breezin'

George Benson

Breezin' George Benson

Give Me the Night

George Benson

Give Me the Night George Benson

Givin' It Up

George Benson

Givin' It Up George Benson

The Ultimate Collection

George Benson

The Ultimate Collection George Benson

Playlists

You may also like...

Tone Poem

Charles Lloyd & The Marvels

Tone Poem Charles Lloyd & The Marvels

Keith Jarrett 75 - A Sequence by Manfred Eicher

Keith Jarrett

Sunset In The Blue

Melody Gardot

Sunset In The Blue Melody Gardot

On Vacation

Till Brönner

On Vacation Till Brönner

Bright Size Life

Pat Metheny

Bright Size Life Pat Metheny
In your panoramas...
Stevie Wonder, Funking Up the ‘70s

Between 1972 and 1976, a young Stevie Wonder recorded five albums that would leave their mark on the history of Motown, as well as on the entire world of pop and soul music: A musical and technological nirvana that is still just as influential today.

Santana: The Tijuana Lizard

Santana’s CV boasts an iconic Woodstock performance, a dozen Grammy Awards, millions of record sales (thanks to his metamorphosis into a Latin pop star), and more and more prestigious collaborations... He’s one of those artists that everyone loves - peers, public and critics alike. Here, we explore the life of an accomplished artist who is constantly renewing himself, much like a lizard shedding its skin.

John Coltrane, the Continuous Blow(n)

Just half a century ago, the American saxophonist passed away at only 40 years old, leaving behind many recordings which have revolutionized the history of his instrument, of jazz, and also of the music of the twentieth century.

In the news...