Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

George Benson - The New Boss Guitar

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

The New Boss Guitar

George Benson with the Brother Jack McDuff Quartet

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

George Benson was only 21 when, on May 1, 1964, he recorded his first album as a leader, The New Boss Guitar of George Benson. At that point, the guitarist had yet to become a huge name in jazz, although many of those who knew him for his work with Jack McDuff's group (which he joined in 1962) agreed that he showed great potential. Benson still had some growing to do in 1964, but even so, this is an impressive debut. The guitarist had developed a distinctive, recognizable sound on his instrument, and he plays with both feeling and technique on five Benson originals (including the sly "Shadow Dancers," the exuberant "Rock-A-Bye," and the earthy blues "I Don't Know") as well as interpretations of "Easy Living" and "Will You Still Be Mine." Benson, of course, had an insightful teacher in McDuff, who plays both organ and piano on this hard bop/soul-jazz date. Tenor saxophonist Red Holloway, another member of McDuff's early-'60s group, is also on board, as are bassist Ronnie Boykins and drummer Montego Joe. In 1964, Benson's best work was yet to come; nonetheless, this album is historically important as well as rewarding.
© Alex Henderson /TiVo

More info

The New Boss Guitar

George Benson

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Shadow Dancers (Album Version)
00:04:44

George Benson, Guitar, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Jack McDuff, Organ, AssociatedPerformer - Red Holloway, Tenor Saxophone, AssociatedPerformer - Lew Futterman, Producer - Ronnie Boykins, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Montego Joe, Drums, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 1964 Prestige Records, Inc.

2
The Sweet Alice Blues (Album Version)
00:04:37

George Benson, Composer, MainArtist

℗ 1964 Prestige Records, Inc.

3
I Don't Know (Album Version)
00:06:48

George Benson, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1964 Prestige Records, Inc.

4
Just Another Sunday (Album Version)
00:03:00

George Benson, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1964 Prestige Records, Inc.

5
Will You Still Be Mine? (Album Version)
00:04:26

George Benson, MainArtist - Matt Dennis, ComposerLyricist - Thomas Adair, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1964 Prestige Records, Inc.

6
Easy Living (Album Version)
00:06:36

George Benson, MainArtist - Leo Robin, ComposerLyricist - Ralph Rainger, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1964 Prestige Records, Inc.

7
Rock-A-Bye (Album Version)
00:03:57

George Benson, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1964 Prestige Records, Inc.

8
My Three Sons (Album Version)
00:05:37

George Benson, MainArtist - Jack McDuff, ComposerLyricist - Joe Dukes, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1964 Prestige Records, Inc.

Album Description

George Benson was only 21 when, on May 1, 1964, he recorded his first album as a leader, The New Boss Guitar of George Benson. At that point, the guitarist had yet to become a huge name in jazz, although many of those who knew him for his work with Jack McDuff's group (which he joined in 1962) agreed that he showed great potential. Benson still had some growing to do in 1964, but even so, this is an impressive debut. The guitarist had developed a distinctive, recognizable sound on his instrument, and he plays with both feeling and technique on five Benson originals (including the sly "Shadow Dancers," the exuberant "Rock-A-Bye," and the earthy blues "I Don't Know") as well as interpretations of "Easy Living" and "Will You Still Be Mine." Benson, of course, had an insightful teacher in McDuff, who plays both organ and piano on this hard bop/soul-jazz date. Tenor saxophonist Red Holloway, another member of McDuff's early-'60s group, is also on board, as are bassist Ronnie Boykins and drummer Montego Joe. In 1964, Benson's best work was yet to come; nonetheless, this album is historically important as well as rewarding.
© Alex Henderson /TiVo

About the album

Distinctions:

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

A Love Supreme

John Coltrane

A Love Supreme John Coltrane

The Black Saint And The Sinner Lady

Charles Mingus

Ballads

John Coltrane

Ballads John Coltrane

Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No.3 / Ravel: Piano Concerto In G Major

Martha Argerich

More on Qobuz
By George Benson

Guitar Man

George Benson

Guitar Man George Benson

Weekend in London (Live)

George Benson

Weekend in London (Live) George Benson

Breezin'

George Benson

Breezin' George Benson

Give Me the Night

George Benson

Give Me the Night George Benson

Givin' It Up

George Benson

Givin' It Up George Benson

Playlists

You may also like...

Scandi Jazz

Various Artists

Scandi Jazz Various Artists

Sunset In The Blue

Melody Gardot

Sunset In The Blue Melody Gardot

Blue Train

John Coltrane

Blue Train John Coltrane

On Vacation

Till Brönner

On Vacation Till Brönner

Bright Size Life

Pat Metheny

Bright Size Life Pat Metheny
In your panoramas...
Stevie Wonder, Funking Up the ‘70s

Between 1972 and 1976, a young Stevie Wonder recorded five albums that would leave their mark on the history of Motown, as well as on the entire world of pop and soul music: A musical and technological nirvana that is still just as influential today.

A Guide to Don Cherry

The past decade has seen Don Cherry's career raised in historical stature, if not wholly reclaimed and aligned to its true purpose. Thank god for that modern edit!

Impulse! Orange was the New Black

Along with Blue Note and Verve, Impulse! is without doubt one of the best-known American jazz labels. Painted in orange and black, the label not only brought us John Coltrane, but also some of the most adventurous musicians of the 1960s.

In the news...