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Mina Tindle - Sister

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Sister

Mina Tindle

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Sometimes when you get to the end of an album you don’t know what to put on next. On her third record, Mina Tindle helps us out by ending on a piece by Lhasa: Is Anything Wrong. After Sister, listening to Lhasa seems like a logical next step. And Mina Tindle before Lhasa? Brilliant! Like Lhasa, she sings in a folk-pop style with her own delicate grace. And like Lhasa, who lived in Quebec and came from Mexico, Mina Tindle is pretty bohemian. She spends her time between France, Berlin and America (she’s married to Bryce Dessner, The National’s lead singer). The songs on Sister are ecstatic and full. They’re seemingly simple: a touch of piano, drums and electronic sounds and lots of singing. The vocal work is really impressive. The polyphonies puff out like a sail as they drift towards the horizon. We even find Sufjan Stevens’ voice at the end of Give A Little Love, who could have learnt a thing or two about simplicity on his latest album. Despite their contemporary folk exterior, these songs have soul at their cores. Uplifting and almost holy, they cocoon you like a warm blanket. Though the question still remains: what do you listen to after Lhasa?! © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz

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Sister

Mina Tindle

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1
Jessa
00:03:44

Thomas Bartlett, Producer - Mina Tindle, MainArtist

2020 37d03d 2020 37d03d

2
Lions
00:03:55

Thomas Bartlett, Producer - Mina Tindle, MainArtist

2020 37d03d 2020 37d03d

3
Give a Little Love (feat. Sufjan Stevens)
00:03:37

Sufjan Stevens, Producer, MainArtist - Thomas Bartlett, Producer - Mina Tindle, MainArtist

2020 37d03d 2020 37d03d

4
Indian Summer
00:04:08

Thomas Bartlett, Producer - Mina Tindle, MainArtist

2020 37d03d 2020 37d03d

5
Louis
00:02:31

Thomas Bartlett, Producer - Mina Tindle, MainArtist

2020 37d03d 2020 37d03d

6
Belle Pénitence
00:03:38

Thomas Bartlett, Producer - Mina Tindle, MainArtist

2020 37d03d 2020 37d03d

7
Fire & Sun
00:03:27

Thomas Bartlett, Producer - Mina Tindle, MainArtist

2020 37d03d 2020 37d03d

8
Triptyque
00:10:01

Thomas Bartlett, Producer - Mina Tindle, MainArtist

2020 37d03d 2020 37d03d

9
Is Anything Wrong
00:03:44

Thomas Bartlett, Producer - Mina Tindle, MainArtist

2020 37d03d 2020 37d03d

Album Description

Sometimes when you get to the end of an album you don’t know what to put on next. On her third record, Mina Tindle helps us out by ending on a piece by Lhasa: Is Anything Wrong. After Sister, listening to Lhasa seems like a logical next step. And Mina Tindle before Lhasa? Brilliant! Like Lhasa, she sings in a folk-pop style with her own delicate grace. And like Lhasa, who lived in Quebec and came from Mexico, Mina Tindle is pretty bohemian. She spends her time between France, Berlin and America (she’s married to Bryce Dessner, The National’s lead singer). The songs on Sister are ecstatic and full. They’re seemingly simple: a touch of piano, drums and electronic sounds and lots of singing. The vocal work is really impressive. The polyphonies puff out like a sail as they drift towards the horizon. We even find Sufjan Stevens’ voice at the end of Give A Little Love, who could have learnt a thing or two about simplicity on his latest album. Despite their contemporary folk exterior, these songs have soul at their cores. Uplifting and almost holy, they cocoon you like a warm blanket. Though the question still remains: what do you listen to after Lhasa?! © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz

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