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Amati Quartet - Schubert: String Quartet No. 14, "Death and the Maiden" - Janacek: String Quartet No. 2, "Intimate Letters"

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Schubert: String Quartet No. 14, "Death and the Maiden" - Janacek: String Quartet No. 2, "Intimate Letters"

Franz Schubert - Leos Janacek

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The severe sound environment of the Maulbronn Abbey, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the German state of Baden-Württemberg that dates to the twelfth century, has given rise to a series of recordings covering varying aspects of music from the Western concert tradition. That sound environment is put to intelligent use in this string quartet recital, which pairs well-worn pieces but gives them unusually intense interpretations that are heightened by the hard resonance of the sound. Sample the very beginning of the Schubert String Quartet in D minor, D. 810 ("Death and the Maiden"), to get yourself into the disc; the opening chords might be described as slashing. Move on to the second-movement variation set built on the song that gives the quartet its name; where many quartets let a sort of debilitated gloom hang over much of the movement, everything here is a life-and-death struggle. The stronger of the two performances on the disc is that of Janácek's 1928 String Quartet No. 2, subtitled "Intimate Letters," a hypersubjective work whose emotional content could have been drawn straight from one of Sigmund Freud's contemporaneous psychotherapy sessions. The work is as dissonant as almost any other of its period that does not completely reject tonality, but the dissonance is used in the service of untrammelled expression. The booklet notes are rather sparse, and in the case of a work as explicitly programmatic as this one a bit of explication might have helped -- the letters evoked are those between the composer and his married mistress. Yet the Amati Quartet's performance, ringing around the monastery walls, brings to mind, to use John le Carré's memorable simile, thoughts that are like birds stuck in a greenhouse. It's an extraordinary reading that rises to the moment offered by a specific performance space, and the disc as a whole, while not for those who like the emotional temperature of their classical music kept to medium, is decisively recommended to those wanting to try out the Maulbronn series.
© TiVo

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Schubert: String Quartet No. 14, "Death and the Maiden" - Janacek: String Quartet No. 2, "Intimate Letters"

Amati Quartet

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String Quartet No. 14 in D minor, D. 810, 'Death and the Maiden' (Franz Schubert)

1
I. Allegro
00:11:54

Franz Schubert, Composer - Amati Quartet, Ensemble, MainArtist

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

2
II. Andante con moto
00:10:35

Franz Schubert, Composer - Amati Quartet, Ensemble, MainArtist

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

3
III. Scherzo. (Allegro molto)
00:03:46

Franz Schubert, Composer - Amati Quartet, Ensemble, MainArtist

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

4
IV. Presto
00:08:51

Franz Schubert, Composer - Amati Quartet, Ensemble, MainArtist

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

String Quartet No. 2, JW VII/13 "Intimate Letters" (Leoš Janáček)

5
I. Andante
00:06:39

Leos Janácek, Composer - Amati Quartet, Ensemble, MainArtist

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

6
II. Adagio
00:06:22

Leos Janácek, Composer - Amati Quartet, Ensemble, MainArtist

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

7
III. Moderato
00:06:08

Leos Janácek, Composer - Amati Quartet, Ensemble, MainArtist

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

8
IV. Allegro
00:08:27

Leos Janácek, Composer - Amati Quartet, Ensemble, MainArtist

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

Album Description

The severe sound environment of the Maulbronn Abbey, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the German state of Baden-Württemberg that dates to the twelfth century, has given rise to a series of recordings covering varying aspects of music from the Western concert tradition. That sound environment is put to intelligent use in this string quartet recital, which pairs well-worn pieces but gives them unusually intense interpretations that are heightened by the hard resonance of the sound. Sample the very beginning of the Schubert String Quartet in D minor, D. 810 ("Death and the Maiden"), to get yourself into the disc; the opening chords might be described as slashing. Move on to the second-movement variation set built on the song that gives the quartet its name; where many quartets let a sort of debilitated gloom hang over much of the movement, everything here is a life-and-death struggle. The stronger of the two performances on the disc is that of Janácek's 1928 String Quartet No. 2, subtitled "Intimate Letters," a hypersubjective work whose emotional content could have been drawn straight from one of Sigmund Freud's contemporaneous psychotherapy sessions. The work is as dissonant as almost any other of its period that does not completely reject tonality, but the dissonance is used in the service of untrammelled expression. The booklet notes are rather sparse, and in the case of a work as explicitly programmatic as this one a bit of explication might have helped -- the letters evoked are those between the composer and his married mistress. Yet the Amati Quartet's performance, ringing around the monastery walls, brings to mind, to use John le Carré's memorable simile, thoughts that are like birds stuck in a greenhouse. It's an extraordinary reading that rises to the moment offered by a specific performance space, and the disc as a whole, while not for those who like the emotional temperature of their classical music kept to medium, is decisively recommended to those wanting to try out the Maulbronn series.
© TiVo

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