Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Mano Negra - Patchanka

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Patchanka

Mano Negra

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Select Audio Quality

To be elegible for this price, subscribe to Sublime+

The debut from Mano Negra is more than a band wanting to be the Clash. It's the sound of a band becoming the Clash (it compresses all the musical sprawl of Sandinista! into a single disc), then going on to find their own sound, most especially with tracks like "Indios de Barcelona" and "Mala Vida," both of which would become staples of their repertoire. "Killin' Rats" is a perfect mix of hip-hop and rock, while their take on the traditional "Rock Island Line" (the song that launched the skiffle movement of the '50s) flows through several musical styles in the course of three minutes. There's nothing that complex about it, but the best rock & roll has always been simple. But there's an undeniable fire about Patchanka -- they sound as if they've just discovered rock, and they play as if their lives depended on it, with Chao singing (probably one of the few to take Joe Strummer as a vocal model) and the rest of the band offering soccer-style chanting as a background. They're not afraid of anything, they're immortal, and they swagger -- and they're often funny, as in the over-the-top fake applause that permeates "Mano Negra," the album's opener. Not everything works -- two of the English-language tracks, "Baby You're Mine" and "Takin' It Up" (which slows the pace -- a bad idea on an album that had been merrily careening to that point), seem like sops to an Anglo market, although the second half of the latter song does pick up with some fake rockabilly. There are plenty of touches of ska, as on "Bragg Jack," which fits in with the grab-bag music ethic, and the album never runs out of steam, a bravura piece of energy and invention, even putting a punk hold on flamenco with the closing "Salga la Luna." But perhaps its most remarkable achievement is that in 1988, when acid house was rendering guitars obsolete all over Europe, Mano Negra could make such a vital record that made rock important again. ~ Chris Nickson

More info

Patchanka

Mano Negra

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app
Listen on Webplayer

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 40 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 40 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Mano Negra 00:01:44

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

2
Ronde de nuit 00:02:58

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

3
Baby You're Mine 00:02:56

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

4
Indios De Barcelona 00:02:40

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

5
Rock Island Line 00:03:10

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer - Traditional, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

6
Noche De Accion 00:02:47

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

7
Darling Darling 00:01:49

Mano Negra, Performer - Daniel Jaumet, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

8
Killin'rats 00:02:27

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

9
Mala Vida 00:02:55

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

10
Tackin'it Up 00:03:42

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

11
La Ventura 00:02:59

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

12
Lonesome Bop 00:02:30

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

13
Bragg Jack 00:02:34

Mano Negra, Performer - Mamak Vatcher, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

14
Salga La Luna 00:03:34

Mano Negra, Performer - Manu chao, Composer

Because Music LC33186 Because Music LC33186

Album Description

The debut from Mano Negra is more than a band wanting to be the Clash. It's the sound of a band becoming the Clash (it compresses all the musical sprawl of Sandinista! into a single disc), then going on to find their own sound, most especially with tracks like "Indios de Barcelona" and "Mala Vida," both of which would become staples of their repertoire. "Killin' Rats" is a perfect mix of hip-hop and rock, while their take on the traditional "Rock Island Line" (the song that launched the skiffle movement of the '50s) flows through several musical styles in the course of three minutes. There's nothing that complex about it, but the best rock & roll has always been simple. But there's an undeniable fire about Patchanka -- they sound as if they've just discovered rock, and they play as if their lives depended on it, with Chao singing (probably one of the few to take Joe Strummer as a vocal model) and the rest of the band offering soccer-style chanting as a background. They're not afraid of anything, they're immortal, and they swagger -- and they're often funny, as in the over-the-top fake applause that permeates "Mano Negra," the album's opener. Not everything works -- two of the English-language tracks, "Baby You're Mine" and "Takin' It Up" (which slows the pace -- a bad idea on an album that had been merrily careening to that point), seem like sops to an Anglo market, although the second half of the latter song does pick up with some fake rockabilly. There are plenty of touches of ska, as on "Bragg Jack," which fits in with the grab-bag music ethic, and the album never runs out of steam, a bravura piece of energy and invention, even putting a punk hold on flamenco with the closing "Salga la Luna." But perhaps its most remarkable achievement is that in 1988, when acid house was rendering guitars obsolete all over Europe, Mano Negra could make such a vital record that made rock important again. ~ Chris Nickson

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...
More on Qobuz
By Mano Negra
You may also like...
Revelation Michael Schenker Fest Stream or Buy for
Western Stars Bruce Springsteen Stream or Buy for
Live At Woodstock Creedence Clearwater Revival Stream or Buy for
Threads Sheryl Crow Stream or Buy for
In your panoramas...
Tuareg Blues: The Rock Oasis

Since the Tuareg group Tinariwen released their first official album in 2002, entitled “The Radio Tisdas Sessions”, their guitar-soaked electric music has become a category of rock - one that is recognised and respected from Bamako to Los Angeles. This international success has allowed many musicians from the Sahara to get their music heard. And Western rockers have often been attracted to this poetic music emanating from the sand dunes and rocky expanses.

Iggy and the Stooges: the dawn of punk

In 1969, a group of self-confessed cretins dynamited rock'n'roll with a charge of distortion and nihilistic lyrics. At the head of these Stooges was Iggy Pop, a sort of obsessive, rebellious Nijinsky, who was destined to become the Godfather of punk rock.

Britpop in 10 Albums

“If punk was about getting rid of hippies, then I'm getting rid of grunge.” It was with this sentence from Damon Albarn in 1993 that England invaded the stage previously dominated by Nirvana and Seattle grunge. Britpop is deeply linked to politics and local identity and emerged just as Tony Blair and New Labour were entering the scene. English romanticism was once again becoming attractive compared to the American identity, which was considered too hollow in the UK. Make way for “Cool Britannia”.

In the news...