Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Baaba Maal - Missiing You (Mi Yeewnii)

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Missiing You (Mi Yeewnii)

Baaba Maal

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

In 2001 Baaba Maal was internationally renowned as one of the most important African stars. Produced in collaboration with Chris Blackwell, who discovered Bob Marley, the Senegalese singer’s previous albums contributed to defining the great currents of world music during the nineties. He put Senegalese rap on the map, experimented with Peter Gabriel, Brian Eno and other sound adventurers. With Missing You he’s the first important African artist to go back to his acoustic roots. Produced by Englishman John Leckie (Radiohead, Stone Roses…) this album was recorded in a mobile studio in the centre of Toucouleur village of Toubab Dialaw. With the exception of an electric bass, all instruments are acoustic: guitars, kora, hoddu, tambin, balafon and numerous percussions such as tama, sabra drums and congas. Numerous choristers, both male and female, have been used in support of the already powerful voice of Baaba Maal. The songs, composed for the occasion, take full advantage of the natural environment in which they were recorded as animal cries and atmospheres of vigils punctuate intimate ballads. And even though we can’t actually discern it, it’s obvious the public galvanised the musicians during the album’s liveliest tracks. Despite the years, this album hasn’t shown any sign of ageing and remains a wonderful way to experience the atmosphere of African nights at a Peul village, animated by its brightest star. © BM/Qobuz

More info

Missiing You (Mi Yeewnii)

Baaba Maal

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Yoolelle Maman
00:04:19

Baaba Maal, interprète

2
Miyaabele
00:03:55

Baaba Maal, interprète

3
Fa Laay Fanaan
00:04:50

Baaba Maal, interprète

4
Leydi Ma
00:03:43

Baaba Maal, interprète

5
Jamma Jenngii
00:04:28

Baaba Maal, interprète

6
Fanta
00:04:21

Baaba Maal, interprète

7
Laare Yoo
00:04:42

Baaba Maal, interprète

8
Senegaale Ngummee
00:05:03

Baaba Maal, interprète

9
Mamadi
00:04:57

Baaba Maal, interprète

10
Kowoni Maayo (Mi Yeewnii)
00:05:49

Baaba Maal, interprète

11
Allah Addu Jam
00:06:52

Baaba Maal, interprète

Album Description

In 2001 Baaba Maal was internationally renowned as one of the most important African stars. Produced in collaboration with Chris Blackwell, who discovered Bob Marley, the Senegalese singer’s previous albums contributed to defining the great currents of world music during the nineties. He put Senegalese rap on the map, experimented with Peter Gabriel, Brian Eno and other sound adventurers. With Missing You he’s the first important African artist to go back to his acoustic roots. Produced by Englishman John Leckie (Radiohead, Stone Roses…) this album was recorded in a mobile studio in the centre of Toucouleur village of Toubab Dialaw. With the exception of an electric bass, all instruments are acoustic: guitars, kora, hoddu, tambin, balafon and numerous percussions such as tama, sabra drums and congas. Numerous choristers, both male and female, have been used in support of the already powerful voice of Baaba Maal. The songs, composed for the occasion, take full advantage of the natural environment in which they were recorded as animal cries and atmospheres of vigils punctuate intimate ballads. And even though we can’t actually discern it, it’s obvious the public galvanised the musicians during the album’s liveliest tracks. Despite the years, this album hasn’t shown any sign of ageing and remains a wonderful way to experience the atmosphere of African nights at a Peul village, animated by its brightest star. © BM/Qobuz

About the album

Distinctions:

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Nevermind

Nirvana

Nevermind Nirvana

Desafinado - Coleman Hawkins Plays Bossa Nova & Jazz Samba

Coleman Hawkins

Speak No Evil

Wayne Shorter

Speak No Evil Wayne Shorter

Tubular Bells

Mike Oldfield

Tubular Bells Mike Oldfield
More on Qobuz
By Baaba Maal

The Traveller (Special Edition)

Baaba Maal

Wango

Baaba Maal

Wango Baaba Maal

Djam Leelii: The Adventurers

Baaba Maal

Firin' In Fouta

Baaba Maal

Firin' In Fouta Baaba Maal

Gilli Men (Auntie Flo Remix)

Baaba Maal

You may also like...

A Touma

Ballaké Sissoko

A Touma Ballaké Sissoko

Djourou

Ballaké Sissoko

Djourou Ballaké Sissoko

Kôrôlén

Toumani Diabaté

Kôrôlén Toumani Diabaté

Mother Nature

Angélique Kidjo

Mother Nature Angélique Kidjo

Hope

Hugh Masekela

Hope Hugh Masekela
In your panoramas...
Bossa nova, the Eternal Wave

Since its creation in the late 1950s, Bossa-nova has become an indispensable part of Brazilian music. The style’s strong evocative power won over artists from all around the world and earned recognition for many first-rate musicians whose works are now seen as classics.

Tuareg Blues: The Rock Oasis

Since the Tuareg group Tinariwen released their first official album in 2002, entitled “The Radio Tisdas Sessions”, their guitar-soaked electric music has become a category of rock - one that is recognised and respected from Bamako to Los Angeles. This international success has allowed many musicians from the Sahara to get their music heard. And Western rockers have often been attracted to this poetic music emanating from the sand dunes and rocky expanses.

Let’s Head for Cape Verde

Ever since the Portuguese annexed this collection of desert islands in the 15th century to make it a slave trade hub, the Black and Portuguese populations have mixed over time to give birth to a brand new language and brand new music—each island more or less developing its own style—, transforming the Cape Verdean dry lands into a bottomless talent pool.

In the news...