Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Katie Gately - Loom

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Loom

Katie Gately

Available in
logo Hi-Res
24-Bit 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Select Audio Quality

To be elegible for this price, subscribe to Sublime+

Loom wasn't the album Katie Gately planned to make -- it was the album she had to make. When her mother was diagnosed with a quick-moving and terminal form of cancer, Gately returned to Brooklyn to care for her, setting aside another album's worth of music to pour her grief and anger into the tracks that became her second full-length. Instead of writing songs that tell listeners about her loss, Gately uses all of her brilliance as a sound designer to engulf them in the experience. She knows exactly how to manipulate sounds -- earthquakes, rattling pill bottles, her own voice -- to embody grief's physicality as well as its emotional impact. In the process, she generates a visceral reaction that resonates on an almost cellular level. On "Waltz," Gately pays homage to "Take This Waltz" by Leonard Cohen (her mother's favorite artist) by distorting its one-two-three beat into a heavy, sickening lurch. "Bracer," a ten-minute epic Gately salvaged from her unfinished album that was her mother's favorite piece from it, provides Loom's unsettled and unsettling heart. As it staggers from seismic drums to surprisingly whimsical woodwinds to glitching electronics, it captures the hallucinatory intensity of fearing, and waiting for, the inevitable implied in the album's title. Loom also suggests connections, however, and Gately expertly unites the different strands of her music over the course of the album. "Ritual" harks back to early works like 2013's Pipes with its massive layers of vocals, while its emotional directness recalls Color's experimental pop. On each of Loom's tracks, Gately blends ancient-sounding melodies with avant-garde production, all of which she weaves together to vividly express every possible vantage point of her loss. She's the cancer itself on "Allay," singing "I am running through your streets in circles" in a piercing tone that sounds equally mocking and sinister; "Tower" is a battle song that portrays cancer-fighting medication as huge drums that marshal the body's forces to fight. Most poignantly, on "Flow" Gately sings from her mother's perspective over radiant drones, delivering a beautiful vocal that's gradually swept away by echoes. Loom's smaller pieces are just as impressive as its major statements: Gately draws on the nearly sacred feel that's informed her music since the beginning with the spectral vocal textures of "Rite." This mood becomes more complex on the haunting "Rest," which closes the album but, wisely, doesn't attempt to provide closure. A stunning achievement, with Loom Gately beautifully honors her mother as well as her commitment to uncompromising music.
© Heather Phares /TiVo

More info

Loom

Katie Gately

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 40 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 40 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Ritual
00:02:58

fabric publishing, MusicPublisher - Katie Gately, Composer, MainArtist

2019 Houndstooth 2019 fabric Publishing

2
Allay
00:04:56

fabric publishing, MusicPublisher - Katie Gately, Composer, MainArtist

2019 Houndstooth 2019 fabric Publishing

3
Waltz
00:05:17

fabric publishing, MusicPublisher - Katie Gately, Composer, MainArtist

2019 Houndstooth 2019 fabric Publishing

4
Bracer
00:10:31

fabric publishing, MusicPublisher - Katie Gately, Composer, MainArtist

2019 Houndstooth 2019 fabric Publishing

5
Rite
00:02:29

fabric publishing, MusicPublisher - Katie Gately, Composer, MainArtist

2019 Houndstooth 2019 fabric Publishing

6
Tower
00:06:05

fabric publishing, MusicPublisher - Katie Gately, Composer, MainArtist

2019 Houndstooth 2019 fabric Publishing

7
Flow
00:06:13

fabric publishing, MusicPublisher - Katie Gately, Composer, MainArtist

2019 Houndstooth 2019 fabric Publishing

8
Rest
00:02:59

fabric publishing, MusicPublisher - Katie Gately, Composer, MainArtist

2019 Houndstooth 2019 fabric Publishing

Album Description

Loom wasn't the album Katie Gately planned to make -- it was the album she had to make. When her mother was diagnosed with a quick-moving and terminal form of cancer, Gately returned to Brooklyn to care for her, setting aside another album's worth of music to pour her grief and anger into the tracks that became her second full-length. Instead of writing songs that tell listeners about her loss, Gately uses all of her brilliance as a sound designer to engulf them in the experience. She knows exactly how to manipulate sounds -- earthquakes, rattling pill bottles, her own voice -- to embody grief's physicality as well as its emotional impact. In the process, she generates a visceral reaction that resonates on an almost cellular level. On "Waltz," Gately pays homage to "Take This Waltz" by Leonard Cohen (her mother's favorite artist) by distorting its one-two-three beat into a heavy, sickening lurch. "Bracer," a ten-minute epic Gately salvaged from her unfinished album that was her mother's favorite piece from it, provides Loom's unsettled and unsettling heart. As it staggers from seismic drums to surprisingly whimsical woodwinds to glitching electronics, it captures the hallucinatory intensity of fearing, and waiting for, the inevitable implied in the album's title. Loom also suggests connections, however, and Gately expertly unites the different strands of her music over the course of the album. "Ritual" harks back to early works like 2013's Pipes with its massive layers of vocals, while its emotional directness recalls Color's experimental pop. On each of Loom's tracks, Gately blends ancient-sounding melodies with avant-garde production, all of which she weaves together to vividly express every possible vantage point of her loss. She's the cancer itself on "Allay," singing "I am running through your streets in circles" in a piercing tone that sounds equally mocking and sinister; "Tower" is a battle song that portrays cancer-fighting medication as huge drums that marshal the body's forces to fight. Most poignantly, on "Flow" Gately sings from her mother's perspective over radiant drones, delivering a beautiful vocal that's gradually swept away by echoes. Loom's smaller pieces are just as impressive as its major statements: Gately draws on the nearly sacred feel that's informed her music since the beginning with the spectral vocal textures of "Rite." This mood becomes more complex on the haunting "Rest," which closes the album but, wisely, doesn't attempt to provide closure. A stunning achievement, with Loom Gately beautifully honors her mother as well as her commitment to uncompromising music.
© Heather Phares /TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...
Celia Angelique Kidjo
Tales Of America J.S. Ondara
More on Qobuz
By Katie Gately
Color Katie Gately
Katie Gately Katie Gately
Waltz Katie Gately
Allay Katie Gately
Lift Katie Gately

Playlists

You may also like...
Folkesange Myrkur
Farangi (Du baroque à l'Orient) Renaud Garcia-Fons, Claire Antonini
Buena Vista Social Club Buena Vista Social Club
Je suis africain Rachid Taha
In your panoramas...
Tuareg Blues: The Rock Oasis

Since the Tuareg group Tinariwen released their first official album in 2002, entitled “The Radio Tisdas Sessions”, their guitar-soaked electric music has become a category of rock - one that is recognised and respected from Bamako to Los Angeles. This international success has allowed many musicians from the Sahara to get their music heard. And Western rockers have often been attracted to this poetic music emanating from the sand dunes and rocky expanses.

Verve Records, the sound of America

Norman Granz hit the nail on the head when he defined his label as “the sound of America”. Admittedly, it was last century. And granted, it mainly just stuck to jazz. But even today, with a catalogue including Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker, Ella Fitzgerald, Bill Evans, Lester Young, Stan Getz, Oscar Peterson and countless others, Verve represents one of the most important musical ventures of the twentieth century.

How reggae conquered American Pop

Not since the days of Bob Marley has Reggae enjoyed such a high profile. For three years, hits by the stars of North American pop have taken on a distinctly Jamaican flavour. From Beyoncé to Rihanna, via Drake or Justin Bieber, more and more pop artists have taken to superimposing their voice over dancehall tracks. Dancehall, the "club" version of reggae, was popularised in the mid-1980s by the legendary producer King Jammy with Sleng Teng, the first electronic reggae track in history. Let's take a look at this velvet coup.

In the news...