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Jon Hopkins - Immunity

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Immunity

Jon Hopkins

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Between Insides and its follow-up Immunity, Jon Hopkins worked with King Creosote on the charming Diamond Mine, which set the Scottish singer/songwriter's ruminations to backdrops that were half rustic folk and half evocative washes of sound. Immunity isn't nearly as acoustic as that collaboration was, but its gently breezy feel lingers on several of these songs: "Breathe This Air" expands from a pounding house rhythm into a roomy piano meditation that recalls Max Richter as much as Diamond Mine, while the title track -- which happens to feature King Creosote's vocals -- closes the album on a whispery note. This feeling extends to the rest of the album in less obvious ways; Immunity is often a more blended, and more expansive-sounding work than Insides, particularly on songs like the Brian Eno-esque "Abandon Window" and "Form by Firelight," which offers a playful study in contrasts in the way it bunches into glitches and then unspools a peaceful piano melody. Some of Immunity's most impressive moments expand on the blend of rhythm and atmosphere Hopkins emphasized on Insides: "Collider" uses sighing vocals courtesy of Dark Horses' Lisa Elle as punctuation for almost imperceptibly shifting beats and a heavy bassline that helps the track build into a moody, elegant whole; meanwhile, the aptly named "Sun Harmonics" turns Elle's sighs into something angelic over the course of 12 serene minutes. Despite these highlights, the album still reflects how Hopkins' polished approach is something of a blessing and a curse. Immunity shows how he's grown, in his subtle, accomplished way, as a composer and producer, yet its tracks occasionally feel like the surroundings for a focal point that never arrives. Even if it doesn't always demand listeners' attention, Immunity is never less than thoughtfully crafted.
© Heather Phares /TiVo

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Immunity

Jon Hopkins

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1
We Disappear
00:04:49

Jon Hopkins, Performer - Jon Hopkins, Writer - Jon Hopkins, Composer - Jon Hopkins, Producer - Jon Hopkins, Mixer - Jon Hopkins, Lyricist

2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd 2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd

2
Open Eye Signal
00:07:48

Jon Hopkins, Performer - Jon Hopkins, Writer - Jon Hopkins, Composer - Jon Hopkins, Producer - Jon Hopkins, Mixer - Rik Simpson, Mixer - Jon Hopkins, Lyricist

2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd 2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd

3
Breathe This Air
00:05:29

Jon Hopkins, Performer - Jon Hopkins, Writer - Jon Hopkins, Composer - Jon Hopkins, Producer - Jon Hopkins, Mixer - Jon Hopkins, Lyricist

2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd 2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd

4
Collider
00:09:21

Jon Hopkins, Performer - Jon Hopkins, Writer - Jon Hopkins, Composer - Jon Hopkins, Producer - Jon Hopkins, Mixer - Jon Hopkins, Lyricist

2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd 2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd

5
Abandon Window
00:04:57

Jon Hopkins, Performer - Jon Hopkins, Writer - Jon Hopkins, Composer - Jon Hopkins, Producer - Jon Hopkins, Mixer - Jon Hopkins, Lyricist

2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd 2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd

6
Form By Firelight
00:05:45

Jon Hopkins, Performer - Jon Hopkins, Writer - Jon Hopkins, Composer - Jon Hopkins, Producer - Jon Hopkins, Mixer - Jon Hopkins, Lyricist

2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd 2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd

7
Sun Harmonics
00:11:54

Jon Hopkins, Performer - Jon Hopkins, Writer - Jon Hopkins, Composer - Jon Hopkins, Producer - Jon Hopkins, Mixer - Jon Hopkins, Lyricist

2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd 2012 Domino Recording Co Ltd

8
Immunity
00:09:56

Jon Hopkins, Performer - Jon Hopkins, Writer - Kenny Anderson, Writer - Jon Hopkins, Composer - Kenny Anderson, Composer - Jon Hopkins, Producer - Jon Hopkins, Mixer - Jon Hopkins, Lyricist - Kenny Anderson, Lyricist

2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd 2013 Domino Recording Co Ltd

Album Description

Between Insides and its follow-up Immunity, Jon Hopkins worked with King Creosote on the charming Diamond Mine, which set the Scottish singer/songwriter's ruminations to backdrops that were half rustic folk and half evocative washes of sound. Immunity isn't nearly as acoustic as that collaboration was, but its gently breezy feel lingers on several of these songs: "Breathe This Air" expands from a pounding house rhythm into a roomy piano meditation that recalls Max Richter as much as Diamond Mine, while the title track -- which happens to feature King Creosote's vocals -- closes the album on a whispery note. This feeling extends to the rest of the album in less obvious ways; Immunity is often a more blended, and more expansive-sounding work than Insides, particularly on songs like the Brian Eno-esque "Abandon Window" and "Form by Firelight," which offers a playful study in contrasts in the way it bunches into glitches and then unspools a peaceful piano melody. Some of Immunity's most impressive moments expand on the blend of rhythm and atmosphere Hopkins emphasized on Insides: "Collider" uses sighing vocals courtesy of Dark Horses' Lisa Elle as punctuation for almost imperceptibly shifting beats and a heavy bassline that helps the track build into a moody, elegant whole; meanwhile, the aptly named "Sun Harmonics" turns Elle's sighs into something angelic over the course of 12 serene minutes. Despite these highlights, the album still reflects how Hopkins' polished approach is something of a blessing and a curse. Immunity shows how he's grown, in his subtle, accomplished way, as a composer and producer, yet its tracks occasionally feel like the surroundings for a focal point that never arrives. Even if it doesn't always demand listeners' attention, Immunity is never less than thoughtfully crafted.
© Heather Phares /TiVo

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