Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Frans Brüggen - Haydn :  The Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Haydn : The Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross

Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century - Frans Brüggen

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

The commission came from the port city of Cádiz, in southern Spain. Joseph Haydn had been invited to compose orchestral passion music for performance during Holy Week. The Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross, which contributed significantly to Haydn's international reputation, also exists in versions for string quartet and piano, and as an oratorio, but the symphonic version presented here is the original. The composer himself considered this one of his finest works, and today, more than two centuries later, we can only concur. Haydn "translated" Christ's last words, culled from the various gospels, into seven slow, sober and imposingly spiritual movements.
After Cádiz the work became removed from its liturgical context. In modern-day programming attempts have been made to reconstruct the original setting, but in a concert hall, spoken commentary only interferes with the music, and even more so on a recording. In respecting this objection, but at the same time desiring to create a meaningful space between the movements, Frans Brüggen invited the Dutch-American composer Ron Ford (Kansas City, 1959) to compose instrumental intermezzi. "This was a real challenge," says Ford. "I looked for a balance between contrast and creating suitable connections. With this sort of commission you have to ask yourself: what haven't we had yet? Haydn is punctual, logical, direct. What is missing is a sense of swell and ebb. I explored that route, with the sound of the Orchestra of the 18th Century in mind. Their breathing style of playing is unique in the world." (Glossa)
Under the steady hands of Frans Brüggen, the Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century performs the orchestral version of Haydn with sculpted balances, molded ensembles, and bright but warmly blended colors. Brüggen gives Haydn's music the sense of seriousness and spirituality it needs to succeed, but never allows the work to become bogged down in its own solemnity. Brüggen has written that he was looking for brief musical interludes to take the place of the Gospel readings that were originally intended to separate the movements, and Ford's intermezzi serve that function. The aesthetic viewpoint of the listener will determine whether or not they satisfactorily serve that function. (Qobuz)


 

More info

Haydn : The Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross

Frans Brüggen

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

Die 7 letzten Worte unseres Erlosers am Kreuze (The 7 Last Words), Hob.XX:1A (version for orchestra) (Joseph Haydn)

1
Introduzione. Maestoso ed Adagio
00:06:05

Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century - Frans Bruggen, Conductor - Joseph Haydn, Composer

2
Sonata I. Largo ('Pater, dimitte illis, quia nesciunt, quid faciunt')
00:05:47

Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century - Frans Bruggen, Conductor - Joseph Haydn, Composer - Ron Ford, Composer (Intermezzi)

3
Sonata II. Grave e cantabile ('Hodie mecum eris in Paradiso')
00:05:46

Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century - Frans Bruggen, Conductor - Joseph Haydn, Composer - Ron Ford, Composer (Intermezzi)

4
Sonata III. Grave ('Mulier, ecce filius tuus')
00:06:56

Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century - Frans Bruggen, Conductor - Joseph Haydn, Composer - Ron Ford, Composer (Intermezzi)

5
Sonata IV. Largo ('Deus meus, utquid dereliquisti me ?')
00:05:24

Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century - Frans Bruggen, Conductor - Joseph Haydn, Composer - Ron Ford, Composer (Intermezzi)

6
Sonata V. Adagio ('Sitio')
00:06:30

Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century - Frans Bruggen, Conductor - Joseph Haydn, Composer - Ron Ford, Composer (Intermezzi)

7
Sonata VI. Lento ('Consummatum est')
00:05:24

Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century - Frans Bruggen, Conductor - Joseph Haydn, Composer - Ron Ford, Composer (Intermezzi)

8
Sonata VII. Largo ('In manus tuas, Domine, commendo spiritum meum')
00:05:28

Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century - Frans Bruggen, Conductor - Joseph Haydn, Composer - Ron Ford, Composer (Intermezzi)

9
Il Terremoto. Presto e con tutta la forza
00:01:39

Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century - Frans Bruggen, Conductor - Joseph Haydn, Composer

Album Description

The commission came from the port city of Cádiz, in southern Spain. Joseph Haydn had been invited to compose orchestral passion music for performance during Holy Week. The Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross, which contributed significantly to Haydn's international reputation, also exists in versions for string quartet and piano, and as an oratorio, but the symphonic version presented here is the original. The composer himself considered this one of his finest works, and today, more than two centuries later, we can only concur. Haydn "translated" Christ's last words, culled from the various gospels, into seven slow, sober and imposingly spiritual movements.
After Cádiz the work became removed from its liturgical context. In modern-day programming attempts have been made to reconstruct the original setting, but in a concert hall, spoken commentary only interferes with the music, and even more so on a recording. In respecting this objection, but at the same time desiring to create a meaningful space between the movements, Frans Brüggen invited the Dutch-American composer Ron Ford (Kansas City, 1959) to compose instrumental intermezzi. "This was a real challenge," says Ford. "I looked for a balance between contrast and creating suitable connections. With this sort of commission you have to ask yourself: what haven't we had yet? Haydn is punctual, logical, direct. What is missing is a sense of swell and ebb. I explored that route, with the sound of the Orchestra of the 18th Century in mind. Their breathing style of playing is unique in the world." (Glossa)
Under the steady hands of Frans Brüggen, the Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century performs the orchestral version of Haydn with sculpted balances, molded ensembles, and bright but warmly blended colors. Brüggen gives Haydn's music the sense of seriousness and spirituality it needs to succeed, but never allows the work to become bogged down in its own solemnity. Brüggen has written that he was looking for brief musical interludes to take the place of the Gospel readings that were originally intended to separate the movements, and Ford's intermezzi serve that function. The aesthetic viewpoint of the listener will determine whether or not they satisfactorily serve that function. (Qobuz)


 

Details of original recording : Recorded live in Utrecht (Vredenburg) and in Leiden (Stadsgehoorzaal), Netherlands, in November 2004

About the album

Distinctions:

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Fragile

Yes

Fragile Yes

Ben Webster Meets Oscar Peterson

Ben Webster

Greatest Hits

Tracy Chapman

Greatest Hits Tracy Chapman

When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?

Billie Eilish

More on Qobuz
By Frans Brüggen

Teleman, Loeillet & Others: Recorder Works

Frans Brüggen

Ludwig van Beethoven : The Symphonies (Live from Rotterdam, 2011)

Frans Brüggen

Haydn: Sturm und Drang, Paris & London Symphonies

Frans Brüggen

Telemann, Lœillet, Fasch & Quantz: Chamber Music with Flutes

Frans Brüggen

The Early Recordings, Vol. 2

Frans Brüggen

You may also like...

Haydn: String Quartets, Op. 76 Nos. 4-6

Chiaroscuro Quartet

Entre Orient & Occident

Virgil Boutellis-Taft

Entre Orient & Occident Virgil Boutellis-Taft

Gade: Sonatas for Violin and Piano

Christina Åstrand

Six Evolutions - Bach: Cello Suites

Yo-Yo Ma

Bach: Little Books

Francesco Corti

Bach: Little Books Francesco Corti
In your panoramas...
Fabio Biondi & Europa Galante, 30 years of freedom

The Italian violinist and conductor Fabio Biondi, notably famous for his rendition of the Four Seasons by Vivaldi with his ensemble Europa Galante, is one of the musicians who actively spurns the idea of separating and compartmentalising music. We take a look back at the career of one of the most versatile and open-minded classical musicians of our time, and an essential figure of baroque violin.

Mason Bates' weird and wonderful electronic symphonies

What do you mean, you haven’t heard about Mason Bates (yet)? He is one of the hottest names on the North-American music scene. Born in 1977, Bates is a symphonic and lyrical composer as well as an electro DJ (under the alias DJ Masonic) – two completely opposing genres which he takes great delight in mixing. Around half of his symphonic and lyrical work consists, in one way or another, of electronic sounds. The majority of these sounds are “every day sounds”, which are prerecorded and later put into a score. On the release date of his brilliant opera The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs, Qobuz interviewed this extraordinary person.

François Couperin, the modern harpsichord

A favourite of Louis XIV, François Couperin (1668-1733) was the harpsichord superstar of the 18th century. At the time, the harpsichord was a prestigious instrument which was at the height of its fame (although it would return to obscurity in the following century), and Couperin revolutionised the way it was played, breaking a path that would later be trod by other virtuosos of the period like Dandrieu or Rameau. The Quebecois harpsichordist Olivier Fortin tells Qobuz the story of "Couperin the Great".

In the news...