Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Lilya Zilberstein|Grand Piano Masters: Appassionata

Grand Piano Masters: Appassionata

Ludwig van Beethoven

Available in
logo Hi-Res
24-Bit 96.0 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

The "Grand Piano Masters" series title for this disc may seem a little bit of a stretch when applied to the only moderately well-known Russian-born pianist Lilya Zilberstein, but she lives up to the billing here with Beethoven performances that can stand with anything on the market. The disc is a product of Germany's K&K label, which specializes in live performances held in historically significant, if not acoustically appropriate, locations. Here they manage both. The Castle Church of Bad Homburg offers a fine ambience for piano music in general and for Zilberstein's muscular, dynamic style in particular. The disc offers the first half of a live concert whose date is localized only to October 2007; the second half was devoted to music of Brahms. At 52 minutes the program is short, but it is complete in itself, and one wants to hear the other disc if only to find out whether Zilberstein can sustain the intensity level from this half. Zilberstein has managed to devise fresh, fully realized interpretations of these two sonatas; no small feat, especially in the case of the ubiquitous Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57, "Appassionata." Hear Zilberstein's exquisite shaping of the work's brooding opening page. The Beethovenian short-short-short long motif that plays such an important role in binding the music together is introduced in the shadows, but soon enough emerges as an exclamation with sufficent force to propel the main theme through its numerous harmonic transformations. The level of tension in the entire sonata is remarkable; even the middle movement seems to seethe with repressed energy. The early Piano Sonata No. 2 in A major, Op. 2/2, is equally strong, with a unique rhythmic conception of the main theme. The booklet is the one weak spot, with flowery phrases describing the recording project that somehow transmit very little real information, unsuccessfully artsy photos, and notes on the music cribbed from other publications. But just sit and listen: even among all the Beethoven sonatas on the market, this one stands out.
© TiVo

More info

Grand Piano Masters: Appassionata

Lilya Zilberstein

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 90 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this playlist and more than 90 million songs with our unlimited streaming plans.

From $10.83/month

Piano Sonata No. 2 in A major, Op. 2 No. 2 (Ludwig van Beethoven)

1
I. Allegro vivace (Live)
00:07:41

Lilya Zilberstein, piano

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

2
II. Largo appassionato (Live)
00:07:51

Lilya Zilberstein, piano

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

3
III. Scherzo. Allegretto - Trio (Live)
00:03:20

Lilya Zilberstein, piano

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

4
IV. Rondo. Grazioso (Live)
00:06:52

Lilya Zilberstein, piano

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

Cantata III- Dir vorrei (Ludwig van Beethoven)

5
I. Allegro assai (Live)
00:10:41

Lilya Zilberstein, piano

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

6
II. Andante con moto (Live)
00:06:18

Lilya Zilberstein, piano

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

7
III. Allegro ma non troppo - Presto (Live)
00:08:31

Lilya Zilberstein, piano

(C) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt (P) 2011 K&K Verlagsanstalt

Album Description

The "Grand Piano Masters" series title for this disc may seem a little bit of a stretch when applied to the only moderately well-known Russian-born pianist Lilya Zilberstein, but she lives up to the billing here with Beethoven performances that can stand with anything on the market. The disc is a product of Germany's K&K label, which specializes in live performances held in historically significant, if not acoustically appropriate, locations. Here they manage both. The Castle Church of Bad Homburg offers a fine ambience for piano music in general and for Zilberstein's muscular, dynamic style in particular. The disc offers the first half of a live concert whose date is localized only to October 2007; the second half was devoted to music of Brahms. At 52 minutes the program is short, but it is complete in itself, and one wants to hear the other disc if only to find out whether Zilberstein can sustain the intensity level from this half. Zilberstein has managed to devise fresh, fully realized interpretations of these two sonatas; no small feat, especially in the case of the ubiquitous Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57, "Appassionata." Hear Zilberstein's exquisite shaping of the work's brooding opening page. The Beethovenian short-short-short long motif that plays such an important role in binding the music together is introduced in the shadows, but soon enough emerges as an exclamation with sufficent force to propel the main theme through its numerous harmonic transformations. The level of tension in the entire sonata is remarkable; even the middle movement seems to seethe with repressed energy. The early Piano Sonata No. 2 in A major, Op. 2/2, is equally strong, with a unique rhythmic conception of the main theme. The booklet is the one weak spot, with flowery phrases describing the recording project that somehow transmit very little real information, unsuccessfully artsy photos, and notes on the music cribbed from other publications. But just sit and listen: even among all the Beethoven sonatas on the market, this one stands out.
© TiVo

About the album

Improve album information

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Puccini: Tosca

Leontyne Price

Puccini: Tosca Leontyne Price

Vincenzo Bellini : Norma

Cecilia Bartoli

Vincenzo Bellini : Norma Cecilia Bartoli

Verdi : Aida

Sir Georg Solti

Verdi : Aida Sir Georg Solti

Barn

Neil Young

Barn Neil Young
More on Qobuz
By Lilya Zilberstein

Lilya Zilberstein Plays Piano Works

Lilya Zilberstein

Debussy: Pour le piano, L.95; Estampes, L.100 / Ravel: Miroirs, M.43; Sonatine, M.40; Jeux d'eau, M.30

Lilya Zilberstein

Rachmaninov: Preludes Op. 32; Shostakovich: Piano Sonata No. 1

Lilya Zilberstein

Chopin: Mazurkas

Lilya Zilberstein

Chopin: Mazurkas Lilya Zilberstein

Rachmaninov: Piano Concertos Nos.2 & 3

Lilya Zilberstein

Playlists

You may also like...

Eclipse

Hilary Hahn

Eclipse Hilary Hahn

Sibelius: Complete Symphonies

Klaus Mäkelä

The New Four Seasons - Vivaldi Recomposed

Max Richter

Old Friends New Friends

Nils Frahm

Nightscapes

Magdalena Hoffmann

Nightscapes Magdalena Hoffmann
In your panoramas...
8 Great Women of Electronic

From the pioneers of musique concrete to the stars of 21st century clubbing, Qobuz is celebrating eight women who have left their own distinct marks on electronic music over the past fifty years.

Scriabin's Flamboyant Raptures

Somewhat overshadowed today by his compatriots Rimsky-Korsakov, Stravinsky and Rachmaninov, Alexander Scriabin is nonetheless a key figure in Russian music. At the beginning of the 20th century, the composer and virtuoso pianist broke away from the Romantic legacy to offer a unique and innovative musical language which no one would follow. His work, deeply influenced by mystical philosophy and synaesthesia, would undergo a dazzling evolution in barely two decades, interrupted by his premature death at the age of 43.

Nils Frahm, an Atypical Piano Master

Hailed by critics of classical music as well as amateurs of the electronic genre, Nils Frahm’s talent has brought harmony between the two worlds for the last ten years. Whether he plays on a church organ or a synthesiser fitted with effect pedals, the German pianist is always looking forward, and that’s what makes him so appealing.

In the news...