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Andreas Ottensamer - Gershwin: Three Preludes: I. Allegro ben ritmato e deciso (Adapted for Clarinet and Piano by Ottensamer)

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Gershwin: Three Preludes: I. Allegro ben ritmato e deciso (Adapted for Clarinet and Piano by Ottensamer)

Andreas Ottensamer, Julien Quentin

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Gershwin: Three Preludes: I. Allegro ben ritmato e deciso (Adapted for Clarinet and Piano by Ottensamer)

Andreas Ottensamer

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Three Preludes (George Gershwin)

1
I. Allegro ben ritmato e deciso (Adapted for Clarinet and Piano by Ottensamer)
00:01:48

George Gershwin, Composer - Andreas Ottensamer, Clarinet, Adapter, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Julien Quentin, Piano, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Thomas Bößl, Producer, Engineer, StudioPersonnel

℗ 2021 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

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