Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Doyle Bramhall II - Fitchburg Street

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Fitchburg Street

Doyle Bramhall

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

Doyle Bramhall began his music career on Fitchburg Street in Dallas, and on his album of the same name he applies a healthy slathering of Texas style to some rock, blues, and soul songs from his youth (and one of his own creations). It's a recipe for a raw, messy, and delicious delight for fans of rough-and-tumble bar band blues. Bramhall's style of Texas blues sounds a lot like Stevie Ray Vaughan, and with good reason: Bramhall influenced the Vaughan style, having co-written some of Vaughan's hits, including "Life by the Drop." While Vaughan played it as a soul-wrenching acoustic number on the posthumous The Sky Is Crying, Bramhall picks up the pace to make it a full-throttle rocker. Bramhall's voice is even reminiscent of Vaughan's on many tracks. His vocals are a joyful noise -- what he lacks in talent he makes up for with feeling. He sings with so much enthusiasm on "I'd Rather Be (Blind, Crippled & Crazy)" that you can't help but want to sing along. As befits a Texas blues album, each song features excellent guitar work, and the star guitar belongs to Bramhall's son, Doyle Bramhall II. Doyle the younger plays a mean rhythm guitar and his tone often sounds stolen directly from Vaughan. His shuffle playing on John Lee Hooker's "Dimples" is a dead ringer for Vaughan, while his interpretation of the Band of Gypsies' "Changes" shows that he has some imagination and style of his own. Bramhall's son plays on four tracks, and they shine the most, although the other guitarists and numerous musicians on the album (Bramhall has a lot of friends, it seems) play as tightly as any veteran bar band, held together by Bramhall's solid drumming. The only exception comes on "Sugar (Where'd You Get Your Sugar From)," where Dave Sebree's sloppy slide goes a bit too far out of tune (try a second take next time, guys). But that small misstep can't taint this fun journey through Bramhall's musical memories.
© Michael Gowan /TiVo

More info

Fitchburg Street

Doyle Bramhall II

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Dimples
00:04:06

Doyle Bramhall, MainArtist - Bramhall, Composer - Conrad Music, MusicPublisher

2003 Doyle Bramhall 2003 Conrad Music

2
I'd Rather Be Blind, Crippled and Crazy
00:03:54

Doyle Bramhall, MainArtist - Bramhall, Composer - Inving Music, Inc. E.M>, MusicPublisher

2003 Doyle Bramhall 2003 Inving Music, Inc. E.M>

3
Changes
00:05:57

Doyle Bramhall, MainArtist - Bramhall, Composer - Miles Ahead Music, MusicPublisher

2003 Doyle Bramhall 2003 Miles Ahead Music

4
Life by the Drop
00:03:05

Doyle Bramhall, MainArtist - Bramhall, Composer - Dreaworks Music, Bughouse, MusicPublisher

2003 Doyle Bramhall 2003 Dreaworks Music, Bughouse

5
That's How Strong My Love Is
00:04:16

Doyle Bramhall, MainArtist - Bramhall, Composer - Three Wise Boys Music, MusicPublisher

2003 Doyle Bramhall 2003 Three Wise Boys Music

6
Baby What You Want Me to Do
00:04:11

Doyle Bramhall, MainArtist - Bramhall, Composer - Conrad Music, Seeds of Reed Music, MusicPublisher

2003 Doyle Bramhall 2003 Conrad Music, Seeds of Reed Music

7
It Ain't No Use
00:04:28

Doyle Bramhall, MainArtist - Bramhall, Composer - Embassy Music Corp. Jerry Williams Music, MusicPublisher

2003 Doyle Bramhall 2003 Embassy Music Corp. Jerry Williams Music

8
Maudie
00:03:30

Doyle Bramhall, MainArtist - Bramhall, Composer - Conrad Music, MusicPublisher

2003 Doyle Bramhall 2003 Conrad Music

9
Fourty Four
00:05:50

Doyle Bramhall, MainArtist - Bramhall, Composer - Arc Music, MusicPublisher

2003 Doyle Bramhall 2003 Arc Music

10
Sugar (Where'd You Get Your Sugar From)
00:03:59

Doyle Bramhall, MainArtist - Bramhall, Composer - Arc Music, MusicPublisher

2003 Doyle Bramhall 2003 Arc Music

Album Description

Doyle Bramhall began his music career on Fitchburg Street in Dallas, and on his album of the same name he applies a healthy slathering of Texas style to some rock, blues, and soul songs from his youth (and one of his own creations). It's a recipe for a raw, messy, and delicious delight for fans of rough-and-tumble bar band blues. Bramhall's style of Texas blues sounds a lot like Stevie Ray Vaughan, and with good reason: Bramhall influenced the Vaughan style, having co-written some of Vaughan's hits, including "Life by the Drop." While Vaughan played it as a soul-wrenching acoustic number on the posthumous The Sky Is Crying, Bramhall picks up the pace to make it a full-throttle rocker. Bramhall's voice is even reminiscent of Vaughan's on many tracks. His vocals are a joyful noise -- what he lacks in talent he makes up for with feeling. He sings with so much enthusiasm on "I'd Rather Be (Blind, Crippled & Crazy)" that you can't help but want to sing along. As befits a Texas blues album, each song features excellent guitar work, and the star guitar belongs to Bramhall's son, Doyle Bramhall II. Doyle the younger plays a mean rhythm guitar and his tone often sounds stolen directly from Vaughan. His shuffle playing on John Lee Hooker's "Dimples" is a dead ringer for Vaughan, while his interpretation of the Band of Gypsies' "Changes" shows that he has some imagination and style of his own. Bramhall's son plays on four tracks, and they shine the most, although the other guitarists and numerous musicians on the album (Bramhall has a lot of friends, it seems) play as tightly as any veteran bar band, held together by Bramhall's solid drumming. The only exception comes on "Sugar (Where'd You Get Your Sugar From)," where Dave Sebree's sloppy slide goes a bit too far out of tune (try a second take next time, guys). But that small misstep can't taint this fun journey through Bramhall's musical memories.
© Michael Gowan /TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Aqualung

Jethro Tull

Aqualung Jethro Tull

Thick as a Brick

Jethro Tull

Thick as a Brick Jethro Tull

Speaking in Tongues

Talking Heads

Speaking in Tongues Talking Heads

WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?

Billie Eilish

More on Qobuz
By Doyle Bramhall II

Be Here Now (feat. Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks)

Doyle Bramhall II

Shades

Doyle Bramhall II

Shades Doyle Bramhall II

Rich Man

Doyle Bramhall II

Rich Man Doyle Bramhall II

Welcome

Doyle Bramhall II

Welcome Doyle Bramhall II

Be Here Now (feat. Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks)

Doyle Bramhall II

You may also like...

Mammoth WVH

Mammoth WVH

Mammoth WVH Mammoth WVH

Letter To You

Bruce Springsteen

Letter To You Bruce Springsteen

Power Up

AC/DC

Power Up AC/DC

Rumours

Fleetwood Mac

Rumours Fleetwood Mac

Abbey Road (Super Deluxe Edition)

The Beatles

In your panoramas...
The Pioneers of Rock’n’Roll

Rock’n’roll isn’t dead. But you can count the pioneers of the genre who are still alive on two fingers: Jerry Lee Lewis and Wanda Jackson. They’re 84 and 82. Lewis was a wild rocker signed with Sun Records who made history by igniting his instrument and transforming church music, country and boogie-woogie into wicked rock'n'roll. Jackson was a country singer who had a brilliant career alongside Elvis. Going from Little Richard to Chuck Berry, not forgetting Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, Bo Diddley, Bill Haley, Elvis Presley, Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran, Buddy Holly and Hank Williams, Qobuz pays tribute to the precursors of rock.

The Golden Age of American Death Metal

An often rejected, parodied and misinterpreted sub-genre of metal, the fierce death metal has nevertheless succeeded in garnering a significant following over the decades. Arriving in the 80s, the genre continues to evolve; from its early pursuit of the ultra-violent to its more recent incorporation of aspects from more mainstream genres. Let us look back at the origins of death metal.

The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus

What a difference 50 years can make! By early 1969 rock music had become a leading cultural force: The Who had just recorded Tommy; Cream packed Royal Albert Hall for their farewell concert; Janis Joplin became a solo act; Led Zeppelin performed for the first time. And after four months of recording, The Beatles (aka The White Album) was out and climbing the charts. To understate the obvious, rock music was awash in talent and standards were high.

In the news...