Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Christian Poltéra|Dutilleux: Tout un monde lointain - Lutoslawski: Cello Concerto

Dutilleux: Tout un monde lointain - Lutoslawski: Cello Concerto

Christian Poltéra, Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Jan van Steen

Digital booklet

Available in
logo Hi-Res
24-Bit 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

On this CD, Swiss cellist Christian Poltéra tackles the complete cello works by two of the leading independent-minded European modernists of the mid- to late-twentieth century, Henri Dutilleux and Witold Lutoslawski. Each of the works was written at the instigation of Mstislav Rostropovich, a concerto from each composer, both of which he premiered in 1970, and a solo cello tribute from each, written in 1975 in honor of the Swiss conductor and new music advocate, Paul Sacher. Dutilleux took the title of his concerto, Toute un monde lointain… (A Whole Distant World…), as well as the names of the movements, from the poetry of Baudelaire, the mystery and sensuality of whose writing is reflected in the music. While it has the harmonic sophistication characteristic of postwar European music, Dutilleux's five-movement concerto clearly falls in the lineage of Debussy in its evocative delicacy, essentially lyrical character, and gossamer but colorful orchestration. Lutoslawski's concerto, while idiomatically not too far from Dutilleux's, is more aggressive and emphatic, with a more traditionally competitive relationship between the soloist and the orchestra. These concertos are canonical cello works of the late twentieth century, but the solo pieces are also attractive and idiomatically written, and deserve to be better known. Poltéra delivers committed, virtuosic performances, but he doesn't quite have the radiant tone to make the Dutilleux shimmer and glisten as it can. The ORF Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, led by Jac van Steen, is likewise more persuasive in the more formally and timbrally straightforward Lutoslawski concerto. The sound of BIS' SACD is clean, detailed, and vivid, but particularly in the Dutilleux, it could benefit from more warmth.
© TiVo

More info

Dutilleux: Tout un monde lointain - Lutoslawski: Cello Concerto

Christian Poltéra

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

Cello Concerto "Tout un monde lointain" (Henri Dutilleux)

1
I. Enigme
00:06:43

Christian Poltera, cello - Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jac van Steen, Conductor

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

2
II. Regard
00:07:47

Christian Poltera, cello - Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jac van Steen, Conductor

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

3
III. Houles
00:04:36

Christian Poltera, cello - Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jac van Steen, Conductor

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

4
IV. Miroirs
00:06:59

Christian Poltera, cello - Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jac van Steen, Conductor

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

5
V. Hymne
00:04:56

Christian Poltera, cello - Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jac van Steen, Conductor

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

3 Strophes sur le nom de Sacher (Henri Dutilleux)

6
No. 1. Un poco indeciso
00:03:49

Christian Poltera, cello

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

7
No. 2. Andante sostenuto
00:02:58

Christian Poltera, cello

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

8
No. 3. Vivace
00:02:51

Christian Poltera, cello

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

Cello Concerto

9
Introduction -
00:05:31

Christian Poltera, cello - Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jac van Steen, Conductor

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

10
4 Episodes -
00:06:43

Christian Poltera, cello - Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jac van Steen, Conductor

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

11
Cantilena -
00:05:59

Christian Poltera, cello - Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jac van Steen, Conductor

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

12
Finale
00:07:02

Christian Poltera, cello - Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jac van Steen, Conductor

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

Sacher Variation

13
Sacher Variation
00:04:05

Christian Poltera, cello

2010 BIS 2010 BIS

Album Description

On this CD, Swiss cellist Christian Poltéra tackles the complete cello works by two of the leading independent-minded European modernists of the mid- to late-twentieth century, Henri Dutilleux and Witold Lutoslawski. Each of the works was written at the instigation of Mstislav Rostropovich, a concerto from each composer, both of which he premiered in 1970, and a solo cello tribute from each, written in 1975 in honor of the Swiss conductor and new music advocate, Paul Sacher. Dutilleux took the title of his concerto, Toute un monde lointain… (A Whole Distant World…), as well as the names of the movements, from the poetry of Baudelaire, the mystery and sensuality of whose writing is reflected in the music. While it has the harmonic sophistication characteristic of postwar European music, Dutilleux's five-movement concerto clearly falls in the lineage of Debussy in its evocative delicacy, essentially lyrical character, and gossamer but colorful orchestration. Lutoslawski's concerto, while idiomatically not too far from Dutilleux's, is more aggressive and emphatic, with a more traditionally competitive relationship between the soloist and the orchestra. These concertos are canonical cello works of the late twentieth century, but the solo pieces are also attractive and idiomatically written, and deserve to be better known. Poltéra delivers committed, virtuosic performances, but he doesn't quite have the radiant tone to make the Dutilleux shimmer and glisten as it can. The ORF Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, led by Jac van Steen, is likewise more persuasive in the more formally and timbrally straightforward Lutoslawski concerto. The sound of BIS' SACD is clean, detailed, and vivid, but particularly in the Dutilleux, it could benefit from more warmth.
© TiVo

About the album

Distinctions:

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Cinema

Ludovico Einaudi

Cinema Ludovico Einaudi

Ludwig van Beethoven : Piano Concerto No.5 "Emperor" - Piano Sonata No.32 in C Minor, Op.111

Nelson Freire

Bach: Piano Works

Nelson Freire

Bach: Piano Works Nelson Freire

Breakfast In America

Supertramp

More on Qobuz
By Christian Poltéra

Toch: Works for Cello

Christian Poltéra

Toch: Works for Cello Christian Poltéra

Barber: Cello Concerto, Cello Sonata, Adagio for strings

Christian Poltéra

Ligeti: Concertos

Christian Poltéra

Ligeti: Concertos Christian Poltéra

R. Schumann, C. Schumann & Brahms: Sonatas & Songs

Christian Poltéra

Mendelssohn : Works for Cello & Piano

Christian Poltéra

Playlists

You may also like...

BACH: The Art of Life

Daniil Trifonov

BACH: The Art of Life Daniil Trifonov

Schubert: Winterreise

Mark Padmore

Schubert: Winterreise Mark Padmore

Souvenirs d'Italie

Maurice Steger

Souvenirs d'Italie Maurice Steger

Exiles

Max Richter

Exiles Max Richter

Recomposed By Max Richter: Vivaldi, The Four Seasons

Max Richter

In your panoramas...
The Paradox of Esa-Pekka Salonen’s Studio

Esa-Pekka Salonen is an acclaimed finnish conductor and prolific composer. With over 60 albums under his belt, he has heavily contributed to the history of musical interpretation. This is an interview with an exceptional musician, who discusses his unique approach to working on classical music in the studio.

The Stylish Henry Mancini

Sophistication, humour, sensitivity… These are the words that often come to mind when describing Henry Mancini’s music. 23 years after his death, he is still seen as a major and influential pop composer. No doubt because, in addition to his glossy and light works for which he is renowned (notably Breakfast at Tiffany’s and The Pink Panther), he also knew how to display the complexity of his musical language in more tormented compositions.

The Little Tramp: The Great Composer

As the Paris Philharmonic puts on a major exhibition dedicated entirely to his career, it’s the perfect opportunity to take a look back at Charlie Chaplin’s close ties with music. He may be famous as a legendary performer and director, but the man with the iconic bowler hat and cane also composed the music in his films himself.

In the news...