Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Rose Dorn - Days You Were Leaving

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Days You Were Leaving

Rose Dorn

Available in
logo Hi-Res
24-Bit 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Select Audio Quality

To be elegible for this price, subscribe to Sublime+

Returning engineer Phil Hartunian from prior EPs, Days You Were Leaving, the full-length debut of Los Angeles indie trio Rose Dorn, stays loyal to the home-recorded, melancholic folk-rock that earned them a record deal with Bar/None. Rarely deviating from middling tempos and languid atmospheres, the album invites elevated feet and rain-sheltered porches. That imagery is partly suggested by Big Thunder," an over-seven-minute scene-setter that opens with the sound of steady rainfall, then a single, decaying note on the guitar. The track gathers momentum slowly, building a makeshift melody one note at a time before co-vocalist Scarlet Knight enters over two minutes in with a weary "Stay in bed till two/It's warm outside and my room is red hot and everyone is blue." The rain-scored narrative is punctuated by guitar-generated sound effects and organic sounds like bird calls and whistles before it locks into a rhythmic waltz over broken chords. Eventually, drums and distortion factor in. Functioning as an overture that leaves 'em wanting more, it leads into the bouncy "Shaking," which changes tempos with singers and points of view. The cinematic presentation makes an impression early, and the album goes on to deliver hypnotic and catchy '90s lo-fi-descended indie rock with a rickety impressionism that extends to lyrics about dreaming, sleep, and anxiety, including trippy lines like "Some light's harder to break down than plastic/Peaking through you." Song highlights include the harmonically modulating "Heaven II" and the lush, meandering "Deathwish," though the quality control here is consistent. It's an intriguing and promising debut, especially considering Days You Were Leaving was held back from release until Knight graduated high school. ~ Marcy Donelson

More info

Days You Were Leaving

Rose Dorn

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app
Listen on Webplayer

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 40 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 40 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Big Thunder 00:07:24

Rose Dorn, MainArtist

2019 Bar None Records 2019 Bar None Records

2
Shaking 00:02:57

Rose Dorn, MainArtist

2019 Bar None Records 2019 Bar None Records

3
Genius 00:03:07

Rose Dorn, MainArtist

2019 Bar None Records 2019 Bar None Records

4
Collar 00:04:02

Rose Dorn, MainArtist

2019 Bar None Records 2019 Bar None Records

5
Champ 00:03:09

Rose Dorn, MainArtist

2019 Bar None Records 2019 Bar None Records

6
LRP 00:01:16

Rose Dorn, MainArtist

2019 Bar None Records 2019 Bar None Records

7
HYC 00:01:53

Rose Dorn, MainArtist

2019 Bar None Records 2019 Bar None Records

8
Deathwish 00:03:51

Rose Dorn, MainArtist

2019 Bar None Records 2019 Bar None Records

9
Heaven II 00:05:01

Rose Dorn, MainArtist

2019 Bar None Records 2019 Bar None Records

10
Wish 00:02:21

Rose Dorn, MainArtist

2019 Bar None Records 2019 Bar None Records

Album Description

Returning engineer Phil Hartunian from prior EPs, Days You Were Leaving, the full-length debut of Los Angeles indie trio Rose Dorn, stays loyal to the home-recorded, melancholic folk-rock that earned them a record deal with Bar/None. Rarely deviating from middling tempos and languid atmospheres, the album invites elevated feet and rain-sheltered porches. That imagery is partly suggested by Big Thunder," an over-seven-minute scene-setter that opens with the sound of steady rainfall, then a single, decaying note on the guitar. The track gathers momentum slowly, building a makeshift melody one note at a time before co-vocalist Scarlet Knight enters over two minutes in with a weary "Stay in bed till two/It's warm outside and my room is red hot and everyone is blue." The rain-scored narrative is punctuated by guitar-generated sound effects and organic sounds like bird calls and whistles before it locks into a rhythmic waltz over broken chords. Eventually, drums and distortion factor in. Functioning as an overture that leaves 'em wanting more, it leads into the bouncy "Shaking," which changes tempos with singers and points of view. The cinematic presentation makes an impression early, and the album goes on to deliver hypnotic and catchy '90s lo-fi-descended indie rock with a rickety impressionism that extends to lyrics about dreaming, sleep, and anxiety, including trippy lines like "Some light's harder to break down than plastic/Peaking through you." Song highlights include the harmonically modulating "Heaven II" and the lush, meandering "Deathwish," though the quality control here is consistent. It's an intriguing and promising debut, especially considering Days You Were Leaving was held back from release until Knight graduated high school. ~ Marcy Donelson

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...
More on Qobuz
By Rose Dorn
You may also like...
In your panoramas...
And then Nirvana killed rock ‘n’ roll

Thirty-two years ago, Nirvana was born: the most unexpected punk swerve of the end of the 20th century. A rocketing career, international hits, hordes of fans and a tragic epilogue for this worldwide phenomenon. And what if Kurt Cobain’s band was none other than the last band in the history of rock? The ultimate generational phenomenon of genre, if not its last myth.

Interpol, fade to black

At the dawn of the new millennium, when garage was king, the New York quartet that then became a trio exploded onto the scene by reviving the dark romanticism of 80’s post-punk. But over their six albums, would the grace that touched Interpol become obsolete?

Soul Music, a nod to the past

Since the start of the Teenies, many voices have resurrected the soul from the sixties and seventies with albums recorded “the old way”. With Amy Winehouse, Leon Bridges, Sharon Jones, Michael Kiwanuka and Curtis Harding, to mention a few, the vintage groove has made a flamboyant comeback.

In the news...