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Soft Cell - Cruelty Without Beauty

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Cruelty Without Beauty

Soft Cell

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Soft Cell's fourth studio album was released a full 18 years after the duo's third, This Last Night in Sodom (1984). During those 18 years, both Marc Almond and Dave Ball pursued solo careers to huge success, and occasionally worked together on albums (Marc Almond's wonderful 1990 album, Enchanted) and remix singles. But here, the two are together in full force. Almond's lyrics are among the best he has ever written, especially on the tragic "Whatever It Takes," which seems to be the sequel to their debut single, "Fun City," revisiting the same character 25 years later. It all comes together with brilliant writing and Ball's atmospheric and swelling arrangement of the eerie music. And the music has grown; sure, it sounds like an updated Soft Cell, but the '80s are nowhere in sight. Wisely, this is not a "retro" album with re-recordings of the duo's big hits, but rather a more mature Soft Cell. Overall, the album has a dark, semi-political tone reflecting the late '90s and early '00s. While it is dark, it is also captivating and accessible. Almond's voice is strong and emotive, living and breathing his stories and observations. Autobiographical? Perhaps, but in the end it does not matter. The stories are vivid, and the music incredible. The only real shame is that Almond and Ball were not creating music for 18 years, because this album shows the talent and ability of these two writers, and how the times have adapted to them. ~ Aaron Badgley

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Cruelty Without Beauty

Soft Cell

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1
Darker Times 00:04:25

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

2
Monoculture 00:03:55

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

3
Le Grand Guignol 00:04:14

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

4
The Night 00:04:16

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

5
Last Chance 00:04:30

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

6
Together Alone 00:05:46

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

7
Desperate 00:04:45

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

8
Whatever It Takes 00:04:37

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

9
All out of Love 00:04:59

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

10
Sensation Nation 00:04:05

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

11
Caligula Syndrome 00:04:51

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

12
On an Up 00:04:26

Soft Cell, MainArtist

(C) 2002 Cooking Vinyl (P) 2002 Cooking Vinyl

Album Description

Soft Cell's fourth studio album was released a full 18 years after the duo's third, This Last Night in Sodom (1984). During those 18 years, both Marc Almond and Dave Ball pursued solo careers to huge success, and occasionally worked together on albums (Marc Almond's wonderful 1990 album, Enchanted) and remix singles. But here, the two are together in full force. Almond's lyrics are among the best he has ever written, especially on the tragic "Whatever It Takes," which seems to be the sequel to their debut single, "Fun City," revisiting the same character 25 years later. It all comes together with brilliant writing and Ball's atmospheric and swelling arrangement of the eerie music. And the music has grown; sure, it sounds like an updated Soft Cell, but the '80s are nowhere in sight. Wisely, this is not a "retro" album with re-recordings of the duo's big hits, but rather a more mature Soft Cell. Overall, the album has a dark, semi-political tone reflecting the late '90s and early '00s. While it is dark, it is also captivating and accessible. Almond's voice is strong and emotive, living and breathing his stories and observations. Autobiographical? Perhaps, but in the end it does not matter. The stories are vivid, and the music incredible. The only real shame is that Almond and Ball were not creating music for 18 years, because this album shows the talent and ability of these two writers, and how the times have adapted to them. ~ Aaron Badgley

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