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Steve Miller Band - Children Of The Future

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Children Of The Future

Steve Miller Band

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A psychedelic blues rock-out, 1968's Children of the Future marked Steve Miller's earliest attempt at the ascent that brought him supersonic superstardom. Recorded at Olympic Studios in London with storied producer Glyn Johns at the helm, the set played out as pure West Coast rock inflected with decade-of-love psychedelia but intriguingly cloaked in the misty pathos of the U.K. blues ethic. Though bandmate Boz Scaggs contributed a few songs, the bulk of the material was written by Miller while working as a janitor at a music studio in Texas earlier in the year. The best of his efforts resonate in a side one free-for-all that launches with the keys and swirls of the title track and segues smoothly through "Pushed Me Through It" and "In My First Mind," bound for the epic, hazy, lazy, organ-inflected "The Beauty of Time Is That It's Snowing," which ebbs and flows in ways that are continually surprising. The second half of the LP is cast in a different light -- a clutch of songs that groove together but don't have the same sleepy flow. Though it has since attained classic status -- Miller himself was still performing it eight years later -- Scaggs' "Baby's Callin' Me Home" is a sparse, lightly instrumentalized piece of good old '60s San Francisco pop. His "Steppin' Stone," on the other hand, is a raucous, heavy-handed blues freakout with a low-riding bass and guitar breaks that angle out in all directions. And whether the title capitalized at all on the Monkees' similarly titled song, released a year earlier, is anybody's guess. Children of the Future was a brilliant debut. And while it is certainly a product of its era, it's still a vibrant reminder of just how the blues co-opted the mainstream to magnificent success.
© Amy Hanson /TiVo

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Children Of The Future

Steve Miller Band

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1
Children Of The Future
00:03:01

Steve Miller Band, MainArtist - GLYN JOHNS, Producer - Steven Haworth Miller, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1968 Capitol Records, LLC

2
Pushed Me To It
00:00:38

Steve Miller Band, MainArtist - GLYN JOHNS, Producer - Steven Haworth Miller, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1968 Capitol Records, LLC

3
You've Got The Power
00:00:53

Steve Miller Band, MainArtist - GLYN JOHNS, Producer - Steven Haworth Miller, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1968 Capitol Records, LLC

4
In My First Mind
00:07:37

Steve Miller Band, MainArtist - GLYN JOHNS, Producer - Steven Haworth Miller, ComposerLyricist - Jim Peterman, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1968 Capitol Records, LLC

5
The Beauty Of Time Is That It's Snowing (Psychedelic B.B.)
00:05:10

Steve Miller Band, MainArtist - GLYN JOHNS, Producer - Steven Haworth Miller, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1968 Capitol Records, LLC

6
Baby's Callin' Me Home
00:03:16

Boz Scaggs, ComposerLyricist - Ben Sidran, Harpsichord, AssociatedPerformer - Steve Miller Band, MainArtist - GLYN JOHNS, Producer

℗ 1968 Capitol Records, LLC

7
Steppin' Stone
00:03:09

Boz Scaggs, ComposerLyricist - Steve Miller Band, MainArtist - GLYN JOHNS, Producer

℗ 1968 Capitol Records, LLC

8
Roll With It
00:02:29

Steve Miller Band, Producer, MainArtist - Steven Haworth Miller, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1968 Capitol Records, LLC

9
Junior Saw It Happen
00:02:30

Jim Pulte, ComposerLyricist - Steve Miller Band, MainArtist - GLYN JOHNS, Producer

℗ 1968 Capitol Records, LLC

10
Fanny Mae
00:03:09

Morris Levy, ComposerLyricist - STEVE MILLER, Producer - Steve Miller Band, MainArtist - Buster Brown, ComposerLyricist - Clarence L. Lewis, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1968 Capitol Records, LLC

11
Key To The Highway
00:06:20

Charles Segar, ComposerLyricist - Steve Miller Band, MainArtist - GLYN JOHNS, Producer - William Lee Broonzy, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1968 Capitol Records, LLC

Album Description

A psychedelic blues rock-out, 1968's Children of the Future marked Steve Miller's earliest attempt at the ascent that brought him supersonic superstardom. Recorded at Olympic Studios in London with storied producer Glyn Johns at the helm, the set played out as pure West Coast rock inflected with decade-of-love psychedelia but intriguingly cloaked in the misty pathos of the U.K. blues ethic. Though bandmate Boz Scaggs contributed a few songs, the bulk of the material was written by Miller while working as a janitor at a music studio in Texas earlier in the year. The best of his efforts resonate in a side one free-for-all that launches with the keys and swirls of the title track and segues smoothly through "Pushed Me Through It" and "In My First Mind," bound for the epic, hazy, lazy, organ-inflected "The Beauty of Time Is That It's Snowing," which ebbs and flows in ways that are continually surprising. The second half of the LP is cast in a different light -- a clutch of songs that groove together but don't have the same sleepy flow. Though it has since attained classic status -- Miller himself was still performing it eight years later -- Scaggs' "Baby's Callin' Me Home" is a sparse, lightly instrumentalized piece of good old '60s San Francisco pop. His "Steppin' Stone," on the other hand, is a raucous, heavy-handed blues freakout with a low-riding bass and guitar breaks that angle out in all directions. And whether the title capitalized at all on the Monkees' similarly titled song, released a year earlier, is anybody's guess. Children of the Future was a brilliant debut. And while it is certainly a product of its era, it's still a vibrant reminder of just how the blues co-opted the mainstream to magnificent success.
© Amy Hanson /TiVo

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