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John Lee Hooker - Boom Boom

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Boom Boom

John Lee Hooker

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John Lee Hooker won many new listeners with his 1989 star-studded comeback album, The Healer, and his 1992 studio album, Boom Boom, was designed as introduction to his classic songs for this new audience. It wasn't that The Healer or its 1991 follow-up, Mr. Lucky, avoided either Hooker's signature boogie or several of his signature tunes, but they were tempered by both a slicker production and newly written tunes. In contrast, Boom Boom was lean and direct, relying on such staples as "Boom Boom," "I'm Bad Like Jesse James," "Bottle Up and Go," and "I Ain't Gonna Suffer No More." This leanness is in comparison to its two immediate predecessors, of course, because Boom Boom is hardly as gritty as the original versions of these tunes. It might not feel as slick as The Healer, but it's polished and professional and filled with cameos -- but this time, the professional sound comes from the seasoned sidemen offering support and the stars here are all guitarists (or in the case of Charlie Musselwhite, a harpist) who never overshadow Hooker. Jimmie Vaughan and Robert Cray have never been known for their flashiness and they give their respective numbers -- "Boom Boom" and "Same Old Blues Again" -- sharp, typically tasteful leads, but even Albert Collins seems a bit restrained on "Boogie at Russian Hill" -- it's as if all involved decided to lay back and give Hook the center stage. However, he's not in a particularly energetic mood here. He's hardly lazy, but he's not inspired either, which leaves Boom Boom as a rather curious entry in his latter-day comeback catalog. The feel is better than The Healer (and certainly the subsequent Chill Out), but it's not as memorable as some of the other albums that may not have been as consistent but at least had distinguishing characteristics. Boom Boom just captures Hooker the professional -- which is good enough to modestly entertain as it plays but it leaves no real impression behind. [Pointblank reissued the CD in 1992.]
© Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

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Boom Boom

John Lee Hooker

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1
Boom Boom
00:04:18

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Roy Rogers, Producer

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

2
I'm Bad Like Jesse James
00:02:14

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

3
Same Old Blues Again
00:06:13

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

4
Sugar Mama
00:04:06

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

5
Trick Bag (Shoppin' For My Tombstone)
00:04:39

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

6
Boogie At Russian Hill
00:04:35

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

7
Hittin' The Bottle Again
00:02:23

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Roy Rogers, Producer

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

8
Bottle Up & Go
00:02:46

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

9
Thought I Heard
00:04:36

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

10
I Ain't Gonna Suffer No More
00:06:26

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

11
Dimples Bonus Track
00:03:36

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

12
Ain't No Love In This House Bonus Track
00:03:43

John Lee Hooker, MainArtist

℗ 2007 Shout! Factory LLC

Album Description

John Lee Hooker won many new listeners with his 1989 star-studded comeback album, The Healer, and his 1992 studio album, Boom Boom, was designed as introduction to his classic songs for this new audience. It wasn't that The Healer or its 1991 follow-up, Mr. Lucky, avoided either Hooker's signature boogie or several of his signature tunes, but they were tempered by both a slicker production and newly written tunes. In contrast, Boom Boom was lean and direct, relying on such staples as "Boom Boom," "I'm Bad Like Jesse James," "Bottle Up and Go," and "I Ain't Gonna Suffer No More." This leanness is in comparison to its two immediate predecessors, of course, because Boom Boom is hardly as gritty as the original versions of these tunes. It might not feel as slick as The Healer, but it's polished and professional and filled with cameos -- but this time, the professional sound comes from the seasoned sidemen offering support and the stars here are all guitarists (or in the case of Charlie Musselwhite, a harpist) who never overshadow Hooker. Jimmie Vaughan and Robert Cray have never been known for their flashiness and they give their respective numbers -- "Boom Boom" and "Same Old Blues Again" -- sharp, typically tasteful leads, but even Albert Collins seems a bit restrained on "Boogie at Russian Hill" -- it's as if all involved decided to lay back and give Hook the center stage. However, he's not in a particularly energetic mood here. He's hardly lazy, but he's not inspired either, which leaves Boom Boom as a rather curious entry in his latter-day comeback catalog. The feel is better than The Healer (and certainly the subsequent Chill Out), but it's not as memorable as some of the other albums that may not have been as consistent but at least had distinguishing characteristics. Boom Boom just captures Hooker the professional -- which is good enough to modestly entertain as it plays but it leaves no real impression behind. [Pointblank reissued the CD in 1992.]
© Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

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