Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Midori Gotō (Midori)|Beethoven : Violin Concerto & Romances 1 & 2

Beethoven : Violin Concerto & Romances 1 & 2

Midori - Festival Strings Lucerne - Daniel Dodds

Digital booklet

Available in
logo Hi-Res
24-Bit 96.0 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

It's a bit surprising that violinist Midori, whose repertory falls squarely in the mainstream, for the most part, waited until 2020 to record her first reading of the Beethoven Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61. However, listeners will find it worth the wait. Her reading is well-considered and distinctive. Her notes give an idea of what is to come: she emphasizes the fantasy-like qualities of the score, taking a deliberate approach that avoids sweeping virtuosity. Midori does run counter to type, but her playing is coherent and makes sense. It may be the first movement, relatively consistent in tempo and lacking grand gestures even in the Fritz Kreisler cadenza, that will be most difficult for many listeners to accept, but Midori's method becomes clearer in the slow movement, where her relaxed performance blooms into an intense, even revelatory lyricism. The finale is also very strong, with a wonderfully light and lively treatment of the main theme. In Midori's hands, the two rarely performed Romances for violin and orchestra take on new weight as they show elements in common with the violin concerto. Midori is sensitively accompanied by the Lucerne Festival Strings under Daniel Dodds in a generally modest-sized performance that corresponds well to her aims, and the sound from the KKL Luzern Concert Hall is ideal.
© TiVo

More info

Beethoven : Violin Concerto & Romances 1 & 2

Midori Gotō (Midori)

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 80 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this playlist and more than 80 million songs with our unlimited streaming plans.

From $10.83/month

Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61 (Ludwig van Beethoven)

1
I. Allegro ma non troppo
Midori
00:23:37

Midori, Violin - Festival Strings Lucerne - Daniel Dodds, Conductor - Ludwig van Beethoven, Composer

© 2020 Midori Goto under exclusive license to Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company A Warner Classics/Erato release, ℗ 2020 Midori Goto under exclusive license to Parlophone Records Limited

2
II. Larghetto
Midori
00:08:43

Midori, Violin - Festival Strings Lucerne - Daniel Dodds, Conductor - Ludwig van Beethoven, Composer

© 2020 Midori Goto under exclusive license to Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company A Warner Classics/Erato release, ℗ 2020 Midori Goto under exclusive license to Parlophone Records Limited

3
III. Rondo allegro
Midori
00:09:48

Midori, Violin - Festival Strings Lucerne - Daniel Dodds, Conductor - Ludwig van Beethoven, Composer

© 2020 Midori Goto under exclusive license to Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company A Warner Classics/Erato release, ℗ 2020 Midori Goto under exclusive license to Parlophone Records Limited

Romance No. 1 in G major, Op. 40 (Traditional)

4
Romance No. 1 in G Major, Op. 40
Midori
00:06:05

Midori, Violin - Festival Strings Lucerne - Daniel Dodds, Conductor - Ludwig van Beethoven, Composer

© 2020 Midori Goto under exclusive license to Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company A Warner Classics/Erato release, ℗ 2020 Midori Goto under exclusive license to Parlophone Records Limited

Romance No. 2 in F major, Op. 50 (Ludwig van Beethoven)

5
Romance No. 2 in F Major, Op. 50
Midori
00:07:53

Midori, Violin - Festival Strings Lucerne - Daniel Dodds, Conductor - Ludwig van Beethoven, Composer

© 2020 Midori Goto under exclusive license to Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company A Warner Classics/Erato release, ℗ 2020 Midori Goto under exclusive license to Parlophone Records Limited

Album Description

It's a bit surprising that violinist Midori, whose repertory falls squarely in the mainstream, for the most part, waited until 2020 to record her first reading of the Beethoven Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61. However, listeners will find it worth the wait. Her reading is well-considered and distinctive. Her notes give an idea of what is to come: she emphasizes the fantasy-like qualities of the score, taking a deliberate approach that avoids sweeping virtuosity. Midori does run counter to type, but her playing is coherent and makes sense. It may be the first movement, relatively consistent in tempo and lacking grand gestures even in the Fritz Kreisler cadenza, that will be most difficult for many listeners to accept, but Midori's method becomes clearer in the slow movement, where her relaxed performance blooms into an intense, even revelatory lyricism. The finale is also very strong, with a wonderfully light and lively treatment of the main theme. In Midori's hands, the two rarely performed Romances for violin and orchestra take on new weight as they show elements in common with the violin concerto. Midori is sensitively accompanied by the Lucerne Festival Strings under Daniel Dodds in a generally modest-sized performance that corresponds well to her aims, and the sound from the KKL Luzern Concert Hall is ideal.
© TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Beethoven : 9 Symphonies (1963)

Herbert von Karajan

Beethoven : 9 Symphonies (1963) Herbert von Karajan

Williams: Violin Concerto No. 2 & Selected Film Themes

Anne-Sophie Mutter

Beethoven : Symphonies n°5 & n°7

Carlos Kleiber

From The Fires

Greta Van Fleet

From The Fires Greta Van Fleet
More on Qobuz
By Midori Gotō (Midori)

Mozart: Sinfonia concertante, Concerto for Violin & Piano

Midori Gotō (Midori)

Paganini: Violin Concerto 1 - Tchaikovsky: Sérénade mélancolique, Valse-Scherzo

Midori Gotō (Midori)

Encore !

Midori Gotō (Midori)

Encore ! Midori Gotō (Midori)

Mendelssohn & Bruch : Violin Concertos

Midori Gotō (Midori)

Sibelius: Violin Concerto - Bruch: Scottish Fantasy

Midori Gotō (Midori)

Playlists

You may also like...

The New Four Seasons - Vivaldi Recomposed

Max Richter

Exiles

Max Richter

Exiles Max Richter

Beethoven: Complete Piano Concertos

Krystian Zimerman

Old Friends New Friends

Nils Frahm

Nightscapes

Magdalena Hoffmann

Nightscapes Magdalena Hoffmann
In your panoramas...
The Earth’s Song: The World of Gustav Mahler

What could have prompted Gustav Mahler to compose a work as unclassifiable as this one? Written between 1907 and 1908, a pivotal period in Mahler's life, The Song of the Earth occupies a special place within his oeuvre. It combines the “fin de siècle” spirit with the fascination for the exotic that was spreading amongst his peers at the time. Vienna was in turmoil when this music was composed, and the piece oscillates between the notions of farewell and new beginnings. With a lot of layers to peel back, The Song of the Earth definitely merits a closer look.

Undervalued: a Look Back on Female Composers

From Sappho of Mytilene to Kaija Saariaho and Clara Schumann, several women have managed to break through the macho codes of the milieu and become composers. While the classical music landscape has been largely dominated by men in recent centuries, the work of their female colleagues, whether pioneers or contemporaries, is just as fascinating. Here we put eleven undervalued figures of female composition in the spotlight.

The Stylish Henry Mancini

Sophistication, humour, sensitivity… These are the words that often come to mind when describing Henry Mancini’s music. 23 years after his death, he is still seen as a major and influential pop composer. No doubt because, in addition to his glossy and light works for which he is renowned (notably Breakfast at Tiffany’s and The Pink Panther), he also knew how to display the complexity of his musical language in more tormented compositions.

In the news...