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Marco Beasley - "Antidotum Tarantulae"

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"Antidotum Tarantulae"

La Tarantella

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This album is not just about the southern Italian tarantella dance; it actually proclaims itself as an antidotum Tarantulae, an antidote to the bite of the tarantula. Both the spider (which is not the same animal as the feared tarantula of the southwestern U.S.) and, indirectly, the dance are named for the city of Taranto in southern Italy. La Tarantella presents tarantellas interspersed with other songs of the region, some traditional, others with known composers. The texts of the vocal pieces are in southern Italian dialects, translated in the booklet into modern Italian, French, and English. The liner notes, in French and English only, are a delightfully diverse lot, with excerpts from writings dating back to the Renaissance, medical and more metaphysical musings on the "tarantism" phenomenon, and several passages that invite the listener to experience the tarantella phenomenon for herself or himself. The pieces included touch not only on the dance but on phenomena that influence the bodily "humors" that the spider's poison was thought to affect. Thus there are songs of love, night, poverty and alms-giving, and more. Some are dances with lots of percussion, others are melancholy. As L'Arpeggiata leader Christina Pluhar writes, "Each of these pieces presents a musical universe in itself, and is functional, therapeutic music, which could stretch over several hours or days, as required. The decision to enclose these dances in a restricted period of time has a practical basis: the real amount of time that can be pressed on a CD." Keep this in mind if L'Arpeggiata gives a concert in your town! "It is left up to the listener to play the pieces in sequence, or to pick out a song that elicits a particularly strong reaction from him," Pluhar goes on. Plainly, this is one of the more original album conceptions of recent years. If you're afraid of spiders, don't buy it; there are several close-ups of the beasts in the booklet notes. And, since the tarantella is still ritually danced in certain southern Italian towns, it would be interesting to know whether it's a louder thing, danced to music with a stronger tendency to break down physical and mental defenses, than what Pluhar presents here. The dominant sound on La Tarantella is Pluhar's Baroque harp, accompanying some very expressive but subtle singers. These questions aside, La Tarantella is quite an intellectual adventure, and you can't say that about every early music release.
© TiVo

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"Antidotum Tarantulae"

Marco Beasley

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1
La Carpinese (Tarantella)
Lucilla Galeazzi
00:03:41

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Traditionnel, Composer - Athanasius Kircher, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

2
Lu Gattu la sonava la zampogna
Marco Beasley
00:01:35

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Traditionnel, Composer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Composer - V. Paparello, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

3
Tarantella napoletana, Tono hypodorico
Lucilla Galeazzi
00:02:43

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Athanasius Kircher, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

4
Lu passariellu (Tarantella dell'Avena)
Marco Beasley
00:02:34

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Traditionnel, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

5
Lamento dei mendicanti
Marco Beasley
00:03:07

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Matteo Salvatore, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

6
Luna lunedda (Pizzica)
Marco Beasley
00:03:34

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Alfio Antico, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

7
Ah, vita bella !
Lucilla Galeazzi
00:03:06

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

8
Tarantella del Gargano
Marco Beasley
00:04:38

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Traditionnel, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

9
Pizzicarella mia (Pizzica tarantata)
Marco Beasley
00:03:05

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Traditionnel, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

10
Silenzio d'amuri
Marco Beasley
00:03:13

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Alfio Antico, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

11
Tarantella calabrese
Marco Beasley
00:03:09

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Traditionnel, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

12
Sogna fiore mio (Ninna nanna sopra la Tarantella)
Marco Beasley
00:04:09

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Ambrogio Sparagna, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

13
Tarantella italiana
Marco Beasley
00:01:47

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Don Francisco Xavier Cid, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

14
Tu bella ca lu tient lu pettu tundu (Tarantella)
Marco Beasley
00:03:43

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Giuseppe De Vittorio, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

15
Pizzica ucci
Marco Beasley
00:02:13

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Traditionnel, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

16
Lu povero 'Ntonuccio (Lamento funebre)
Marco Beasley
00:02:53

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Traditionnel, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

17
Antidotum tarantulae
Marco Beasley
00:02:01

L' Arpeggiata, Performer - Christina Pluhar, Performer - Lucilla Galeazzi, Performer - Marco Beasley, Performer - Athanasius Kircher, Composer

2002 Alpha 2001 Alpha

Album Description

This album is not just about the southern Italian tarantella dance; it actually proclaims itself as an antidotum Tarantulae, an antidote to the bite of the tarantula. Both the spider (which is not the same animal as the feared tarantula of the southwestern U.S.) and, indirectly, the dance are named for the city of Taranto in southern Italy. La Tarantella presents tarantellas interspersed with other songs of the region, some traditional, others with known composers. The texts of the vocal pieces are in southern Italian dialects, translated in the booklet into modern Italian, French, and English. The liner notes, in French and English only, are a delightfully diverse lot, with excerpts from writings dating back to the Renaissance, medical and more metaphysical musings on the "tarantism" phenomenon, and several passages that invite the listener to experience the tarantella phenomenon for herself or himself. The pieces included touch not only on the dance but on phenomena that influence the bodily "humors" that the spider's poison was thought to affect. Thus there are songs of love, night, poverty and alms-giving, and more. Some are dances with lots of percussion, others are melancholy. As L'Arpeggiata leader Christina Pluhar writes, "Each of these pieces presents a musical universe in itself, and is functional, therapeutic music, which could stretch over several hours or days, as required. The decision to enclose these dances in a restricted period of time has a practical basis: the real amount of time that can be pressed on a CD." Keep this in mind if L'Arpeggiata gives a concert in your town! "It is left up to the listener to play the pieces in sequence, or to pick out a song that elicits a particularly strong reaction from him," Pluhar goes on. Plainly, this is one of the more original album conceptions of recent years. If you're afraid of spiders, don't buy it; there are several close-ups of the beasts in the booklet notes. And, since the tarantella is still ritually danced in certain southern Italian towns, it would be interesting to know whether it's a louder thing, danced to music with a stronger tendency to break down physical and mental defenses, than what Pluhar presents here. The dominant sound on La Tarantella is Pluhar's Baroque harp, accompanying some very expressive but subtle singers. These questions aside, La Tarantella is quite an intellectual adventure, and you can't say that about every early music release.
© TiVo

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