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Fontaines D.C. - A Hero's Death

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A Hero's Death

FONTAINES D.C.

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The extreme tension and sincere rage of Dogrel, their first album, is still resonating as Fontaines D.C. strike again while the iron is hot. However, with A Hero’s Death, the Dublin band have shifted gear. They're still taking their influences from the post-punk scriptures of The Fall, Joy Division, Gang Of Four and Public Image Ltd., but this “difficult second album” also goes in other directions. The slow, almost oppressing rhythm on the opening I Don’t Belong introduces the band's new image. This image is that of a group dealing with the instantaneous success of their first album and the weighty tour that followed. Fontaines D.C. broaden their scope with ballads like Sunny and its baritone guitars, remisiscent of Indian summers, or Oh Such a Spring on which Grian Chatten sings with extraordinary delicacy. But A Hero’s Death also has the unstoppable clout that made Dogrel so good, anthems on which Chatten infinitely repeats the same phrase like “Life ain’t always empty”, belted out thirty times on the title track, A Hero’s Death, and “What ya call it, what ya call it, what ya” on Televised Mind… From the beginning, A Hero’s Death oscillates between incredibly rebellious and juvenile tension and more meditative, almost nostalgic sequences. Dogrel finished with Dublin City Sky, an acoustic ballad which conjured up images of a homely old pub and freshly pulled pints of Guinness, like a Pogues record (their favourite band). A Hero’s Death closes with No, another stripped back ballad, à la Oasis this time, which substitutes post-punk pessimism for lighter optimism, punctuated with the phrase “Please don’t lock yourself away just appreciate the grey”. Hard-hitting and brilliant. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

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A Hero's Death

Fontaines D.C.

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1
I Don't Belong
00:04:31

Dan Carey, Producer - FONTAINES D.C., MainArtist

© 2020 Partisan Records ℗ 2020 Partisan Records

2
Love Is The Main Thing
00:03:53

Dan Carey, Producer - FONTAINES D.C., MainArtist

© 2020 Partisan Records ℗ 2020 Partisan Records

3
Televised Mind
00:04:10

Dan Carey, Producer - FONTAINES D.C., MainArtist

© 2020 Partisan Records ℗ 2020 Partisan Records

4
A Lucid Dream
00:03:53

Dan Carey, Producer - FONTAINES D.C., MainArtist

© 2020 Partisan Records ℗ 2020 Partisan Records

5
You Said
00:04:36

Dan Carey, Producer - FONTAINES D.C., MainArtist

© 2020 Partisan Records ℗ 2020 Partisan Records

6
Oh Such A Spring
00:02:32

Dan Carey, Producer - FONTAINES D.C., MainArtist

© 2020 Partisan Records ℗ 2020 Partisan Records

7
A Hero's Death
00:04:18

Dan Carey, Producer - FONTAINES D.C., MainArtist

© 2020 Partisan Records ℗ 2020 Partisan Records

8
Living In America
00:04:57

Dan Carey, Producer - FONTAINES D.C., MainArtist

© 2020 Partisan Records ℗ 2020 Partisan Records

9
I Was Not Born
00:03:49

Dan Carey, Producer - FONTAINES D.C., MainArtist

© 2020 Partisan Records ℗ 2020 Partisan Records

10
Sunny
00:04:52

Dan Carey, Producer - FONTAINES D.C., MainArtist

© 2020 Partisan Records ℗ 2020 Partisan Records

11
No
00:05:08

Dan Carey, Producer - FONTAINES D.C., MainArtist

© 2020 Partisan Records ℗ 2020 Partisan Records

Album Description

The extreme tension and sincere rage of Dogrel, their first album, is still resonating as Fontaines D.C. strike again while the iron is hot. However, with A Hero’s Death, the Dublin band have shifted gear. They're still taking their influences from the post-punk scriptures of The Fall, Joy Division, Gang Of Four and Public Image Ltd., but this “difficult second album” also goes in other directions. The slow, almost oppressing rhythm on the opening I Don’t Belong introduces the band's new image. This image is that of a group dealing with the instantaneous success of their first album and the weighty tour that followed. Fontaines D.C. broaden their scope with ballads like Sunny and its baritone guitars, remisiscent of Indian summers, or Oh Such a Spring on which Grian Chatten sings with extraordinary delicacy. But A Hero’s Death also has the unstoppable clout that made Dogrel so good, anthems on which Chatten infinitely repeats the same phrase like “Life ain’t always empty”, belted out thirty times on the title track, A Hero’s Death, and “What ya call it, what ya call it, what ya” on Televised Mind… From the beginning, A Hero’s Death oscillates between incredibly rebellious and juvenile tension and more meditative, almost nostalgic sequences. Dogrel finished with Dublin City Sky, an acoustic ballad which conjured up images of a homely old pub and freshly pulled pints of Guinness, like a Pogues record (their favourite band). A Hero’s Death closes with No, another stripped back ballad, à la Oasis this time, which substitutes post-punk pessimism for lighter optimism, punctuated with the phrase “Please don’t lock yourself away just appreciate the grey”. Hard-hitting and brilliant. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

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