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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 10, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released September 9, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released September 8, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released September 7, 2021 | Rhino

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Electronic - Released September 3, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released September 1, 2021 | Rhino

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 27, 2021 | Rhino

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Dance - Released August 20, 2021 | Rhino

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 20, 2021 | Rhino

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 20, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released August 20, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released August 12, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released July 29, 2021 | Rhino

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Pop - Released July 28, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released July 28, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released July 22, 2021 | Rhino

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Jazz - Released June 25, 2021 | Rhino

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Reconsidering late-era Miles Davis is a dicey proposition. On one hand, there are albums like Aura that were largely ignored at the time, but upon revisitation, have proven to be challenging and consequential works. On the other, there are albums like Doo-Bop, which have ... not. (To be fair, much of Miles's post-'50s material took folks a while to warm to, as he was often an artist a few steps ahead of his time.) With that in mind, Merci! Miles Live at Vienne is both a curious time capsule and a bit of a "what if?" game. Recorded in France in July 1991, just a few months before Davis passed away, this relatively brisk set clocks in at just over 70 minutes long. Though Miles's trumpet is something of a spectral presence throughout—only occasionally pushing its way to the front of the proceedings—the audience is intensely and vocally appreciative of his playing and that of the band accompanying him. The energy level throughout is surprisingly high and nearly raucous in moments. And yes, this is the peak of Davis's "modern pop songs should be standards" phase, so both "Time After Time" and "Human Nature" get workouts, with all the popping bass and four-on-the-floor rhythm that implies. Similarly, then-new Davis cuts like "Amandla" and "Hannibal" are here, in all their high-gloss vitality. The inclusion of two songs written by Prince make this set an interesting document. Though the two only performed together once (at a 1987 New Year's Eve show at Paisley Park), they were big fans of one another, with Prince pitching several songs for Miles to record over the years and even building a whole jazz band (Madhouse) with the idea that Miles could collaborate with them. Prince wrote "Penetration" and "Jailbait" for Madhouse and submitted them for Miles's consideration in early 1991; Miles and his band recorded both, but the studio versions have never been released, due to Prince's disinclination to assist with their posthumous production. However, they were both consistently played in concert throughout 1991 and the versions here are excellent, with Miles and his band sticking hard and fast to each song's groove while finding plenty of space to stretch out. Thus, unlike Doo-Bop (the posthumous album they would have appeared on), these songs here spark a bit of an exciting round of "what could have been," which is most definitely not the case for most artists' late-period live albums. But, then again, Miles was always a few steps ahead of the game. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Rock - Released May 28, 2021 | Rhino

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Children - Released May 14, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released May 7, 2021 | Rhino

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For fifteen years now New Order has had to make do without a bassist, and without their co-founder Peter Hook, who stormed out in 2006. The new line-up, led by Bernard Sumner with Stephen Morris, Gillian Gilbert, Phil Cunningham and Tom Chapman, is clearly doing no worse, as we can tell from this new live record (their fifth in ten years) made in November 2018 in London's Alexandra Palace. The concert opens with Wagner, before raining down blow after blow on Singularity, which is one of four tracks on the setlist to be taken from the 2015 album Music Complete (the first album they made without Peter Hook). And while the record didn't win around the critics, this track makes masterful use of the old Joy Division DNA. The ghost of Ian Curtis looms over this 140-minute performance, with searing mementoes in the form of Atmosphere, Decades and Love Will Tear Us Apart which closes the set. Along the way, we get all the hits: from Blue Monday to Bizarre Love Triangle and The Perfect Kiss, all in a venue brought to the boil by an ecstatic, nostalgic audience. It's enough to cheer up even the bluest Monday. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz