Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RESkr419.79
CDkr349.79

Opera - Released January 1, 1966 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions Choc de Classica - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CDkr223.29

Classical - Released January 1, 1963 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CDkr239.99

Opera - Released May 6, 2016 | Myto Historical

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
From
HI-RESkr264.29
CDkr220.29

Full Operas - Released November 5, 2001 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
From
CDkr177.59

Classical - Released January 1, 1971 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CDkr86.81

Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released June 28, 2010 | Les Indispensables de Diapason

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
From
CDkr177.59

Classical - Released January 1, 1975 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Karl Böhm's set of the last Mozart symphonies, recorded for Deutsche Grammophon between 1959 and 1966, rank among the greatest performances of these extraordinary works. The Berlin Philharmonic brings genuine warmth and vitality to the symphonies, yet maintains a poise throughout, which, in terms of balance and measured phrasing, is decidedly Classical. Böhm's rendition of the Symphony No. 35 "Haffner" is exciting in the outer movements, but steadily paced in the Andante and the stately Menuetto. The Symphony No. 36 "Linzer" is admirable for its clarity of form and sturdiness, though the performance is briskly paced to keep the music from seeming rigidly architectural. The Symphony No. 38 "Prager" glows with amorous feeling and humor, and Mozart's orchestral palette is at its most colorful in the Andante. After an intensely dramatic introduction, the Symphony No. 39 proceeds in a relaxed, gemütlich manner, and the slower tempi allow the winds to be fully resonant. In the Symphony No. 40, tenderness and pathos are emphasized over anxiety and drama, and Böhm's dynamics are carefully gauged to make this distinction clear. The Symphony No. 41 "Jupiter" is grand and energetic, and the Berlin Philharmonic's performance of the miraculous finale is this set's crowning achievement. © TiVo
From
HI-RESkr563.29
CDkr487.99

Classical - Released June 2, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
The Austrian conductor Karl Böhm is one of the towering conductors of the 20th Century. As the embodiment of the long Austro-German musical tradition, he helped to write musical history. This 19-CD set assembles all the extant recordings he conducted for EMI (notably its German Electrola label) over the period 1935 to 1949 in Dresden, Berlin, Vienna and London includes a number of rarities and the world premiere release of a version of Mozart’s Serenata notturna recorded in Vienna in 1947. It was during these years that Böhm cemented his reputation as a major conductor of Austro-German repertoire. Collectors will also be pleased to know that this set contains all the recordings that featured in the now-iconic series of Dresden-themed LP boxes released by EMI to mark Böhm’s 85th birthday in 1979.
From
CDkr115.39

Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RESkr180.29
CDkr119.99

Symphonies - Released November 17, 2017 | Orfeo

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
From
CDkr119.99

Symphonies - Released August 22, 2007 | Audite

Distinctions Diapason d'or
Thirty years after his glorious performance of Anton Bruckner's Symphony No. 7 in E major with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Karl Böhm's live 1977 concert recording has been released on Audite, and this fine disc is required listening for any serious fan of the conductor or the composer. Böhm's discography of Bruckner's symphonies is comparatively small, with a number of his recordings dating from the 1930s and '40s, so any opportunity to hear his interpretations in modern sound with realistic stereo separation should be taken. And what an opportunity it is, to hear one of the most eloquent and expressive performances of this popular work, one that may not blow the competition away with massive orchestral force or powerful dynamics, but instead draws the listener in with its long-breathed lyricism, magical interplay of tone colors, and sensitivity to the subtleties of the richly chromatic harmonies. Böhm uses the 1885 version, as edited by Leopold Nowak, so the questionable cymbal crash and triangle roll that appear at the climax of the Adagio are, unfortunately, included; yet in most other respects, the listener can feel comfortable with the scholarship behind this exceptional performance. But more than giving a reliable rendition of the work, Böhm delivers a profound emotional experience that is perhaps most comparable to the soul-stirring effect of the great performances by Günter Wand, Eugen Jochum, or Georg Tintner. Listeners who come to the Symphony No. 7 for the first time through this recording will be initiated at the highest level. Audite's sound quality is first-rate, and the recording is unmarred by extraneous noises. © TiVo
From
CDkr179.99

Full Operas - Released October 7, 2014 | Myto Historical

Distinctions 9 de Classica-Répertoire
From
CDkr177.59

Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RESkr238.59
CDkr198.79

Symphonies - Released January 1, 1975 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
Karl Böhm's set of the last Mozart symphonies, recorded for Deutsche Grammophon between 1959 and 1966, rank among the greatest performances of these extraordinary works. The Berlin Philharmonic brings genuine warmth and vitality to the symphonies, yet maintains a poise throughout, which, in terms of balance and measured phrasing, is decidedly Classical. Böhm's rendition of the Symphony No. 35 "Haffner" is exciting in the outer movements, but steadily paced in the Andante and the stately Menuetto. The Symphony No. 36 "Linzer" is admirable for its clarity of form and sturdiness, though the performance is briskly paced to keep the music from seeming rigidly architectural. The Symphony No. 38 "Prager" glows with amorous feeling and humor, and Mozart's orchestral palette is at its most colorful in the Andante. After an intensely dramatic introduction, the Symphony No. 39 proceeds in a relaxed, gemütlich manner, and the slower tempi allow the winds to be fully resonant. In the Symphony No. 40, tenderness and pathos are emphasized over anxiety and drama, and Böhm's dynamics are carefully gauged to make this distinction clear. The Symphony No. 41 "Jupiter" is grand and energetic, and the Berlin Philharmonic's performance of the miraculous finale is this set's crowning achievement. © TiVo
From
HI-RESkr298.29
CDkr248.59

Symphonies - Released October 1, 1996 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res
From
HI-RESkr340.79
CDkr283.99

Symphonies - Released October 1, 1996 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res
From
HI-RESkr298.29
CDkr248.59

Symphonies - Released October 1, 1996 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res
From
HI-RESkr340.79
CDkr283.99

Symphonies - Released October 1, 1996 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res
From
CDkr418.29

Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Given that most folks who love the music of Mozart will probably already have their favorite recordings of his wind concertos and his best-known serenades and divertimentos, why should they seek out this seven-disc collection? Because, even if they already have Dennis Brain's horn concertos or Richard Stoltzman's clarinet concerto or James Galway's flute concertos, they still have to hear these performances of the same works by Günter Högner, Alfred Prinz, and Werner Tripp for three reasons. First, these players have the distinction of being the principal players from the world's greatest Mozart orchestra, the Vienna Philharmonic; second, the accompaniment is provided by the same orchestra; and third, the conducting is provided by Karl Böhm, the Austrian said by some to be the greatest Mozart conductor of the middle years of the twentieth century. All this makes a difference -- a huge difference. Here, the tone, color, rhythm, phrasing, balances, indeed, everything about the performances is so wholly natural and wonderfully idiomatic that even the greatest wind virtuosos sound almost awkward by comparison. Even Böhm's performances of three big serenades with the Berlin Philharmonic sound so completely as one with the music that after them, it'll be hard to go back to even the finest performances by other players. Deutsche Grammophon's stereo sound is as good if not better than 90 percent of digital sound and these recordings are sonically fully competitive. © TiVo
From
CDkr1,303.79

Classical - Released June 19, 2020 | Orfeo