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Film Soundtracks - Released November 18, 2014 | WaterTower Music

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Classical - Released March 15, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 5, 2017 | Epic

It is the Quebec director Denis Villeneuve who bears the heavy responsibility of tackling the sequel of Blade Runner, the science-fiction movie directed by Ridley Scott in 1982, with Harrison Ford in the role of Rick Deckard, a former cop hunting Replicants. For its music, it was first the Icelander Jóhann Jóhannsson, a regular of Villeneuve’s movies (Sicario, Arrival…), that had the just as heavy responsibility to take over from Vangelis, the composer of the soundtrack of the first movie. Finally, the director wanted to get closer in spirit to the Greek composer: he fired Jóhannsson and replaced him with Hans Zimmer, whose ability to musically dress science-fiction needs no further proof. Remember his soundtracks for Christopher Nolan (Inception and Interstellar). For this sequel, Zimmer (helped by Benjamin Wallfish) navigates the synthetic and freezing waters of the first Blade Runner soundtrack. You just have to listen to the introductory track (2049) or to Mesa to notice the striking resemblance with the layers both heavy and harrowing from Vangelis’ score. The rest of the soundtrack is stuffed with atmospheric tracks of the same ilk, designed with extreme care and great efficiency, as always with Zimmer. It’s worth noting the presence of two of Elvis Presley’s sweet songs (among which we find the hit Can’t Stop Falling In Love) and another from Frank Sinatra, which are completely at odds with the whole thing. Maybe we’ll someday have access to the movie’s rejected music, the one composed by Jóhannsson? In the meantime, it constitutes a Grail popular with collectors, as often happens in Hollywood movie score history (see the rejected soundtrack for Troy by Gabriel Yared or the one for Robin and Marian by Michel Legrand). © NM/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 16, 2020 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released November 3, 2017 | Mercury Studios

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 12, 2017 | Sony Classical

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This 12-track collection brings together some of Hans Zimmer's most well-known film scores. With such a huge selection to choose from, The Classics draws material from his work on Inception, The Dark Knight Rises, and Gladiator, among others. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released September 17, 2021 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2006 | Decca Soundtracks

It is tempting to think that even Hans Zimmer, a composer who has written music for cinema projects large and small -- mostly large -- for decades, would be intimidated by the responsibility of composing an original soundtrack score for Ron Howard's film adaptation of Dan Brown's pulp fiction blockbuster The Da Vinci Code. Apparently not. While the music here holds some of Zimmer's trademark dynamic and textural tropes, it is remarkably fresh and expertly nuanced. The high degree of melancholy in the first three sections -- "Dies Maercurii I Maritus," "L'Espirit des Gabriel," and "The Paschal Spiral" -- creates a remarkably brooding tension and a speculative sense of foreboding. The first of these, "Dies Mercurii I Maritus," with its piano and hovering stings, does give way to a large pastoral theme a little over halfway through, but even it is re-introduced by eerie, sparse strings (Hugh Marsh's solo violin playing throughout is his highest achievement yet in a career full of them) before they begin to pulse with suspense. Even here, Zimmer holds some of his cards in check, because this theme gives way to more complex shades, colors, and emotions that don't so much resolve as lead the listener in further. The cues on "Fructus Gravis" that assert themselves about a minute in and carry it out on a swirl of strings, soprano voices and piano, provide for one of those moments in film scoring where the entire range of emotion and ambivalence is revealed. The longer pieces, the aforementioned "Dies Mercurii," "Ad Arcana," "Daniel's 9th Cipher," and "Rose of Arimathea" carry within them those necessary elements not simply to color the screen narrative, but to underscore its meaning, its emotional transference, its sense of confusion, terror, and the impending revelation of a truth long buried. The use of faux Gregorian chant here is ingenious; it never feels contrived or simply layered in for authenticity. It is a genuine creative force and pushes the music into the nooks and crannies where dimension is what makes texture and pace come together in an instructive and creative whole. While this is to be expected in the larger cues, it's often in the incidental music a score falters, loses its place inside the bigger themes, yet Zimmer's control and vision holds firm and carries the listener on a journey that not only points toward the film it illustrates, but one of deep resonance that borders on the spiritual. No matter what aural side projects are created as a cash-in, this original score will stand on its own and should -- if there is any critical or commercial justice -- become a classic. One does wonder what happened to the planned collaboration with Armenian duduk master Djivan Gasparyan, who isn't present, but it's a small question in the end. Bravo. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released August 29, 2012 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released July 15, 2008 | Warner Sunset - Warner Records

Even high-budget Hollywood movies generally get by with one A-list composer, but the renewed Batman series that kicked off with Batman Begins under the direction of Christopher Nolan in 2005 used two, Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard, both of whom return for the second installment, The Dark Knight. Although Zimmer and Howard are co-credited with each of the cues (with Lorne Balfe given a credit for unspecified "additional music"), their styles are sufficiently distinct that their individual contributions don't seem hard to delineate. The highly percussive synthesized music, much of it seemingly already mixed in with sound effects, sounds like Zimmer; the more conventional orchestral passages, sometimes giving way to solo piano, sound like Howard (who is, in fact, credited with playing piano on the soundtrack). Both approaches are combined in these sometimes lengthy cues, however. Those pounding, thunderous drums (or synthesized percussive effects) are never absent for long, even if certain tracks, notably Harvey Two-Face, Blood on My Hands. and Watch the World Burn, have a pastoral, classical feel. Other tracks, such as I'm Not a Hero and A Little Push, in which the percussion dominates, may be more Zimmer than Howard. Still, the two work well together on a score that, by definition, is "dark," laden with ominous sounds and relentlessly rhythmic accompaniments to the fast-paced action in the film. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released May 21, 2007 | Walt Disney Records

As the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy has unfolded, the films' quirky characters have become even more of a draw than the action and special effects. The music for the films has followed suit, although not at the same pace: Hans Zimmer's score for the final film, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End has a few moments of whimsy, spooky drama and exotic flavor mixed with more typical, churning musical backdrops for the action set pieces. With sawing strings and huge brass and choral sections, tracks such as "At Wit's End," "I Don't Think Now Is the Best Time," and "I See Dead People in Boats" are no doubt serviceable in the film's context, but separated from it, they're too repetitive and overwhelming to be enjoyable. However, "Up Is Down"'s Celtic flair makes it more interesting than many of the other amped-up tracks, while the chanted shanty "Hoist the Colours" and mischievous, sinister "Multiple Jacks" prove that the score's quieter moments are the most entertaining. It's also too bad that Keith Richards, who plays Captain Jack Sparrow's pirate dad, isn't featured somehow in the music -- it's a missed opportunity that makes this send-off for Captain Jack and his maties just a little less satisfying. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released February 23, 1999 | RCA Victor

Hans Zimmer's Oscar-nominated score for reclusive director Terrence Malick's ambitious James Jones adaptation -- only the director's third film in 25 years -- is one of his most subtle and sophisticated yet. Then again, it's not as if the German-born composer has ever been known as a master of bombast or overstatement -- Max Steiner he is not (among other works, he penned the award-winning soundtracks for Rain Man and The Lion King). Unlike the scores for most other war movies (The Thin Red Line is set during World War II), the action in Malick's elegiac epic is driven mostly by the action itself (heated exchanges between characters, sudden eruptions of devastating violence) and not the music. The soundtrack, which consists primarily of long, string-laden pieces, also includes one of the film's mesmerizing chants, which were so popular that a separate recording, Chants From The Thin Red Line, consisting entirely of chants by the Melanesian Brotherhood and the Choir of All Saints, was released in conjunction with this recording. © Kathleen C. Fennessy /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released September 3, 2021 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released June 12, 2013 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released July 14, 2008 | Warner Sunset - Warner Records

Even high-budget Hollywood movies generally get by with one A-list composer, but the renewed Batman series that kicked off with Batman Begins under the direction of Christopher Nolan in 2005 used two, Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard, both of whom return for the second installment, The Dark Knight. Although Zimmer and Howard are co-credited with each of the cues (with Lorne Balfe given a credit for unspecified "additional music"), their styles are sufficiently distinct that their individual contributions don't seem hard to delineate. The highly percussive synthesized music, much of it seemingly already mixed in with sound effects, sounds like Zimmer; the more conventional orchestral passages, sometimes giving way to solo piano, sound like Howard (who is, in fact, credited with playing piano on the soundtrack). Both approaches are combined in these sometimes lengthy cues, however. Those pounding, thunderous drums (or synthesized percussive effects) are never absent for long, even if certain tracks, notably Harvey Two-Face, Blood on My Hands. and Watch the World Burn, have a pastoral, classical feel. Other tracks, such as I'm Not a Hero and A Little Push, in which the percussion dominates, may be more Zimmer than Howard. Still, the two work well together on a score that, by definition, is "dark," laden with ominous sounds and relentlessly rhythmic accompaniments to the fast-paced action in the film. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2006 | Walt Disney Records

The always dependable Hans Zimmer took the wheel from Klaus Badelt on 2006's Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, the sequel to Disney's surprise blockbuster smash Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl. The Curse of the Black Pearl score was a mishmash of several composers, and its weaknesses were derived from the resulting lack of focus. While there is little that positions the Dead Man's Chest score anywhere near the esteemed Spielberg-esque mantle that it strives for, Zimmer adds much-needed zest and characterization to the franchise. "Jack Sparrow," a cello-led waltz that perfectly encapsulates Johnny Depp's cartoonish antihero, finally gives the character the musicality it needs, and the occasional burst of Celtic folk brings a warmth and whimsicality to the series that was sorely needed the first time around. Zimmer, who brings his usual blend of percussion-heavy keyboard orchestration to the action sequences, could do this in his sleep, but it's the kind of mediocrity that dispels negativity. Lastly, the embarrassing "He's a Pirate [Tiësto Remix]" sounds like an outtake from a Project Runway/Zoolander "pirate week." © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released July 21, 2017 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 9, 2006 | Varese Sarabande

In recent years the name of movie composer Hans Zimmer has become synonymous with that of director Christopher Nolan. Those who have come to know Zimmer through his dark, moody, bombastic scores to Nolan's films like The Dark Knight and Inception might be surprised by his work on The Holiday. His score for this Christmas-themed romantic comedy by writer/director Nancy Meyers starring Cameron Diaz, Jude Law, Kate Winslet, and Jack Black is appropriately playful, gentle, and infused with holiday spirit. © Sergey Mesenov /TiVo
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Classical - Released March 15, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released November 20, 2020 | Milan

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Hans Zimmer in the magazine