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Pop - Released March 22, 2020 | Wolf+Rothstein - RCA Records

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He has been everywhere these last two years: on TV in Atlanta or Saturday Night Live, in cinemas with Star Wars, and on all the radio shows with his latest global hits Feels Like Summer or This Is America, and his superb video denouncing racism and violence in the country. After a period of confinement, Donald Glover came back without warning, uploading his fourth album, soberly titled 3.15.20. The track listing is just as detached, with tracks composed of numbers indicating the length of time since the beginning of the record, with the exception of Algorhythm, a cranky industrial P-funk that launches the album after a psychedelic prologue, and Time, with a very discreet Ariana Grande (Feels like Summer also returns under the title 42.26). Assisted in production by the faithful Ludwig Goransson and DJ Dahi (Kendrick Lamar, Vince Staples...), Childish Gambino revisits black music with a twist (53.49) and pushes it to its limits, mixing rap, rave and industrial on 32.22 or on the eight minutes of 24.19, somewhere between Prince and Bohemian Rhapsody. These sonic and cultural collisions create great moments, such as the synthetic pop song of the future 19.10 or 12.38 with 21 Savage and Khadja Bonet, the climax of an album that still has the power to upset the applecart. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 10, 2013 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

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Having left his full-time role on the hit comedy Community to concentrate on music, rapper Donald Glover aka Childish Gambino gets broader and bolder on his 2013 effort Because the Internet, an indulgent kaleidoscope of studio tricks and celebrity problems that's still wildly attractive thanks to its smarts and ability to swing. That latter bit comes courtesy of primary producers Glover and Ludwig Goransson, who mix the edgy sounds of indie rap and indie pop with the best the mainstream world of R&B has to offer. Cool, radio-friendly crooner Lloyd shows up on the creamy West Coast dream called "Telegraph Ave.," while "3005" comes with a chorus so uplifting and bright, it makes the nerdy stay-at-home wallflower at its center sound epic and sexy. The booming influence of the A$AP Mob is felt on numerous cloudy cuts like the grand "Worldstar," where popping pills at Coachella, a Martin Scorsese reference, and a twisted sax solo all congeal into a dank glop of hip-hop hash oil. Then there are all the instrumental interludes that divide the album into chapters or suites, because this one reaches for art with some interruptions for getting flashy on "The Worst Guys" (where Chance the Rapper is merely Chance the Hypeman) and crashing on the couch for either a spliff, or maybe spliff and a sweet snuggle, with Jhené Aiko's "Pink Toes." All of it flows splendidly and Gambino's wit, hipness, and lyrical dexterity are all still strong points, with "I got more tail than Petco," "More green than my Whole Foods/And I'm too Fly, Jeff Goldblum," plus a reference to the "Ain't Nobody Got Time for That" meme being some examples. Still, even with all these strong points, Gambino often frames his angst and anger with the burden of being born rich (something he mentions quite often on the album), providing plenty of "we should all have such problems" bait or "hierarchy of needs" ammunition, depending on the listener's viewpoint/bank account. Even the short "The Party" finds him inviting friends over and then yelling at them to get the "F" out, but there's long been a wide gap between the life experience of rappers and their fans, something supported by the growling background vocals on "Crawl" provided by Mystikal, an MC who did plenty of hard time when most of his fans have not. Connecting with the album is nearly impossible, understanding it is difficult, and often enough, its inflated ego is irksome, but Because the Internet is too free and fascinating to be dragged down by these complaints, so if a Yeezus with more flash and fun is what's required, Gambino's got the good stuff. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 6, 2018 | Wolf+Rothstein - RCA Records

Okay it’s Childish Gambino! Stay Calm! During his appearance on Saturday Night Live, where he hosted and was the musical guest, Mr. Donald Glover, alias Childish Gambino, debuted two new tracks off a soon to be released album. The two tracks titled This is America and Saturday are a sneak peak for what’s to come and oh baby we can not wait! This Is America was released with a video directed by Hiro Murai, Glovers long time creative partner on previous music videos and on his award winning comedy series Atlanta. The track coupled with the imagery sees the Atlanta artist in a new light, one in which we are yet to see him. He is addressing recent events and current issues that divide and cripple the USA; gun violence, mass shootings, racism. And it’s a welcomed change for Gambino, as it seems he has moved away from themes of sex, fame and growing up on his early records Kauai, because the internet, Camp, as well as the critically acclaimed soul/funk infused Awaken, My Love!. But now we see him tackling this social juggernaut that he handles with such character and brilliance, both musically and visually.The video is truly thought provoking as we see Glover marching around a warehouse topless, as he shoots a man in the head, dances with some school children, and even mows down an entire choir with an automatic rifle. Sounds pretty shocking right? Additionally, his nonchalance when jumping from jolly dancing to murder seems like a strong narrative on how senseless and emotionless America has become when it comes to gun violence. And it all soon becomes evident that he himself is a mere distraction from the chaos that is occuring in the background (we recommend you re-watch it and see for yourself). It is as if the song holds even more significance and importance with recent events, as we have Kanye West taking on an entirely different approach to try and bring about change, with twitter rants, TMZ appearances and incoherent ramblings that have left society baffled and stunned. This thoughtless output isn’t undertaken by Gambino, who has shifted effortlessly into a voice for transforming our society.It is a credit to the man hailing from Atlanta, as he quite literally does it all. Having graduated from NYU, he started off as a comedy writer for the TV series 30 Rock, moved into acting on the hit show Community, jumped ship to stand up comedy, became an award winning creator of Atlanta, a TV series in which he also stars, and finally as Childish Gambino, he’s a Grammy winning artist. Oh and did we mention he’s starring in the latest Star Wars spin off Solo: A Star Wars Story. There is nothing this man can’t do and it is why his take on America’s political and social climate holds so much weight. It’s a message that has class, quality and all in a time where we really need a coherent voice. The upcoming LP, which is set to be his last as Childish Gambino, cannot come soon enough and although previously he has told us to “Stay Woke”, now we need to face up to the America of today and fight for change. © Aidan Nickerson/ Qobuz 
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released November 15, 2011 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

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In the time before this wonderful album named Camp existed, the “actors who rap” proposition would have been all red flags. Brian Austin Green, Mr. T, Joaquin Phoenix, and many others are on the “cons” list, while the “pros” would have been Drake (barely counts, unless Degrassi: The Next Generation was your thing) and maybe AVN award-winner Dirt Nasty. These were the horrible odds Community star and comedy writer Donald Glover was up against when he took the Internet’s Wu-Tang Name Generator to heart and became rapper Childish Gambino, but anyone who right-clicked on one of his 2010/2011 mixtapes can tell you, he beat those odds, and with Camp, indie rap fans won the Lotto. The gloriously different and wonderfully inspired rhymes that downloaders experienced are here once more, and Gambino’s style is still that attractive blend of heartfelt and humorous or, in a nutshell, I-just-wasn’t-made-for-these-times-and-yet-I-love-the-Internet with “That ain’t even ironic bitch/I love Rugrats!” being a quintessential punch line/decree. He’s got that Kanye-sized swagger on lock too, as the triumphant “All the Shine” struts with vibrant colors, and he's just as complicated, as the track slowly descends into self-doubt and earth tones before it fades into the soft and meek “Letter Home,” all of it adding up to some kind of bizarre and ambitious bipolar backpacker suite. Nerdy wonders and insightful laughs are the reasons you want to visit Camp Gambino, but you’ll stay for the lush, surprisingly large production from Glover and Ludwig Göransson, along with the thrill of untangling it all for hours on end, separating the incredibly cool moments from the touching ones and figuring out how this “actor who raps” packaged it all sensibly in a concept album about summer camp that doubles as his showcase debut. Try it and be stunned or submit to it and be satiated; Camp is like the Drake, Cudi, and Kweli camps all offered their best, but it’s really just Glover and his overwhelming bundle of talent, taking indie hip-hop to new levels after spending the day working alongside Chevy Chase. Remarkable. © David Jeffries /TiVo

R&B - Released July 11, 2018 | Wolf+Rothstein - RCA Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 3, 2014 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

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As Imagine Dragons would say, "welcome to the new age," as Kauai is a benefit EP (money going to Hawaiian eco-preservation) that, when combined with the free STN MTN mixtape, forms a concept mixtape plus EP for a package that continues the story found on Gambino's 2013 album, Because the Internet. Complain that that's convoluted, or better yet, accept that distribution channels now allow for ambitious experiments such as this, because this is an attractive R&B-based EP where Gambino's character offers a smooth crooning appendix that's post-relationship, post-trust-in-the-world, and maybe even post-hip-hop. "Now that it's over, I"ll never be sober" goes the opener with a slow, nostalgic roll underneath, sounding as if the rapper joined the DeBarge family, while "The Palisades" is a calm-and-cool cut with guitars strumming and harmonies bumpin' while the genre of yacht-hop is further explored. Tack this on the mixtape, which was tacked onto the album, and this is an opus worth crowing about, but Kauai on its own is a weird and warm example of Gambino in a casual mode, strolling through pop music as if it ain't nuthin' and yet turning out memorable numbers that come in handy any time the ego swells while the world outside betrays. Snarky and hopeful play well together here, plus Jaden Smith surprises with his stern spoken word during "Late Night in Kauai." © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 10, 2013 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

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Having left his full-time role on the hit comedy Community to concentrate on music, rapper Donald Glover aka Childish Gambino gets broader and bolder on his 2013 effort Because the Internet, an indulgent kaleidoscope of studio tricks and celebrity problems that's still wildly attractive thanks to its smarts and ability to swing. That latter bit comes courtesy of primary producers Glover and Ludwig Goransson, who mix the edgy sounds of indie rap and indie pop with the best the mainstream world of R&B has to offer. Cool, radio-friendly crooner Lloyd shows up on the creamy West Coast dream called "Telegraph Ave.," while "3005" comes with a chorus so uplifting and bright, it makes the nerdy stay-at-home wallflower at its center sound epic and sexy. The booming influence of the A$AP Mob is felt on numerous cloudy cuts like the grand "Worldstar," where popping pills at Coachella, a Martin Scorsese reference, and a twisted sax solo all congeal into a dank glop of hip-hop hash oil. Then there are all the instrumental interludes that divide the album into chapters or suites, because this one reaches for art with some interruptions for getting flashy on "The Worst Guys" (where Chance the Rapper is merely Chance the Hypeman) and crashing on the couch for either a spliff, or maybe spliff and a sweet snuggle, with Jhené Aiko's "Pink Toes." All of it flows splendidly and Gambino's wit, hipness, and lyrical dexterity are all still strong points, with "I got more tail than Petco," "More green than my Whole Foods/And I'm too Fly, Jeff Goldblum," plus a reference to the "Ain't Nobody Got Time for That" meme being some examples. Still, even with all these strong points, Gambino often frames his angst and anger with the burden of being born rich (something he mentions quite often on the album), providing plenty of "we should all have such problems" bait or "hierarchy of needs" ammunition, depending on the listener's viewpoint/bank account. Even the short "The Party" finds him inviting friends over and then yelling at them to get the "F" out, but there's long been a wide gap between the life experience of rappers and their fans, something supported by the growling background vocals on "Crawl" provided by Mystikal, an MC who did plenty of hard time when most of his fans have not. Connecting with the album is nearly impossible, understanding it is difficult, and often enough, its inflated ego is irksome, but Because the Internet is too free and fascinating to be dragged down by these complaints, so if a Yeezus with more flash and fun is what's required, Gambino's got the good stuff. © David Jeffries /TiVo
From
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 3, 2014 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

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As Imagine Dragons would say, "welcome to the new age," as Kauai is a benefit EP (money going to Hawaiian eco-preservation) that, when combined with the free STN MTN mixtape, forms a concept mixtape plus EP for a package that continues the story found on Gambino's 2013 album, Because the Internet. Complain that that's convoluted, or better yet, accept that distribution channels now allow for ambitious experiments such as this, because this is an attractive R&B-based EP where Gambino's character offers a smooth crooning appendix that's post-relationship, post-trust-in-the-world, and maybe even post-hip-hop. "Now that it's over, I"ll never be sober" goes the opener with a slow, nostalgic roll underneath, sounding as if the rapper joined the DeBarge family, while "The Palisades" is a calm-and-cool cut with guitars strumming and harmonies bumpin' while the genre of yacht-hop is further explored. Tack this on the mixtape, which was tacked onto the album, and this is an opus worth crowing about, but Kauai on its own is a weird and warm example of Gambino in a casual mode, strolling through pop music as if it ain't nuthin' and yet turning out memorable numbers that come in handy any time the ego swells while the world outside betrays. Snarky and hopeful play well together here, plus Jaden Smith surprises with his stern spoken word during "Late Night in Kauai." © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released November 15, 2011 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

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In the time before this wonderful album named Camp existed, the “actors who rap” proposition would have been all red flags. Brian Austin Green, Mr. T, Joaquin Phoenix, and many others are on the “cons” list, while the “pros” would have been Drake (barely counts, unless Degrassi: The Next Generation was your thing) and maybe AVN award-winner Dirt Nasty. These were the horrible odds Community star and comedy writer Donald Glover was up against when he took the Internet’s Wu-Tang Name Generator to heart and became rapper Childish Gambino, but anyone who right-clicked on one of his 2010/2011 mixtapes can tell you, he beat those odds, and with Camp, indie rap fans won the Lotto. The gloriously different and wonderfully inspired rhymes that downloaders experienced are here once more, and Gambino’s style is still that attractive blend of heartfelt and humorous or, in a nutshell, I-just-wasn’t-made-for-these-times-and-yet-I-love-the-Internet with “That ain’t even ironic bitch/I love Rugrats!” being a quintessential punch line/decree. He’s got that Kanye-sized swagger on lock too, as the triumphant “All the Shine” struts with vibrant colors, and he's just as complicated, as the track slowly descends into self-doubt and earth tones before it fades into the soft and meek “Letter Home,” all of it adding up to some kind of bizarre and ambitious bipolar backpacker suite. Nerdy wonders and insightful laughs are the reasons you want to visit Camp Gambino, but you’ll stay for the lush, surprisingly large production from Glover and Ludwig Göransson, along with the thrill of untangling it all for hours on end, separating the incredibly cool moments from the touching ones and figuring out how this “actor who raps” packaged it all sensibly in a concept album about summer camp that doubles as his showcase debut. Try it and be stunned or submit to it and be satiated; Camp is like the Drake, Cudi, and Kweli camps all offered their best, but it’s really just Glover and his overwhelming bundle of talent, taking indie hip-hop to new levels after spending the day working alongside Chevy Chase. Remarkable. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 11, 2018 | Wolf+Rothstein - RCA Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 6, 2018 | Wolf+Rothstein - RCA Records

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released November 15, 2011 | Glassnote

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In the time before this wonderful album named Camp existed, the “actors who rap” proposition would have been all red flags. Brian Austin Green, Mr. T, Joaquin Phoenix, and many others are on the “cons” list, while the “pros” would have been Drake (barely counts, unless Degrassi: The Next Generation was your thing) and maybe AVN award-winner Dirt Nasty. These were the horrible odds Community star and comedy writer Donald Glover was up against when he took the Internet’s Wu-Tang Name Generator to heart and became rapper Childish Gambino, but anyone who right-clicked on one of his 2010/2011 mixtapes can tell you, he beat those odds, and with Camp, indie rap fans won the Lotto. The gloriously different and wonderfully inspired rhymes that downloaders experienced are here once more, and Gambino’s style is still that attractive blend of heartfelt and humorous or, in a nutshell, I-just-wasn’t-made-for-these-times-and-yet-I-love-the-Internet with “That ain’t even ironic bitch/I love Rugrats!” being a quintessential punch line/decree. He’s got that Kanye-sized swagger on lock too, as the triumphant “All the Shine” struts with vibrant colors, and he's just as complicated, as the track slowly descends into self-doubt and earth tones before it fades into the soft and meek “Letter Home,” all of it adding up to some kind of bizarre and ambitious bipolar backpacker suite. Nerdy wonders and insightful laughs are the reasons you want to visit Camp Gambino, but you’ll stay for the lush, surprisingly large production from Glover and Ludwig Göransson, along with the thrill of untangling it all for hours on end, separating the incredibly cool moments from the touching ones and figuring out how this “actor who raps” packaged it all sensibly in a concept album about summer camp that doubles as his showcase debut. Try it and be stunned or submit to it and be satiated; Camp is like the Drake, Cudi, and Kweli camps all offered their best, but it’s really just Glover and his overwhelming bundle of talent, taking indie hip-hop to new levels after spending the day working alongside Chevy Chase. Remarkable. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 1, 2014 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 1, 2011 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released March 3, 2014 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

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Dance - Released February 14, 2012 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

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R&B - Released July 11, 2018 | Wolf+Rothstein - RCA Records