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Pop - Released February 16, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

Hi-Res Distinctions Grammy Awards - Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik
Brandi Carlile does not lay idle. Between her new life as an LGBTQ mother which she openly displays or her activism with the association War Child, she has found time to return to the studio for the sixth time. As a mother, the hallucination of an America at the edge of cracking infused the story of what she considers the most intense of her career. By The Way, I Forgive You, entwined by the evangelical theme of forgiveness, co-produced by Shooter Jennings (the son of the late Waylon) and Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Chris Stapleton and Lori McKenna) succeeds the country folk of The Firewatcher's Daughter (2015). Ten tracks totalling 43 minutes, touching on topics such as Carlile's family, politics, identity and the faithful twin Hanseroth (Fightings Machinists). The strings were arranged by the late Paul Buckmaster (Elton John, David Bowie, Rolling Stone or Leonard Cohen) and its all packed into an emotional style of country made for a broad audience. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Pop - Released October 1, 2021 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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For nearly 13 years Brandi Carlile was a cult favorite with a loyal fanbase before her big mainstream breakout moment in 2018 with her sixth album By the Way, I Forgive You Since then, she's become a bona-fide celebrity with a best-selling memoir, a celebrated supergroup (the Highwomen), six Grammys and a slew of A-list friends who pop up on her charming Instagram account. She's been name-checked by Barack Obama as a favorite, produced a record for Tanya Tucker, performed Joni's Blue in its entirety in concert, and released duets with Alicia Keys and Sam Smith. There's a lot riding on her follow-up album, and In These Silent Days is a knockout on a par with such classics as Tapestry, Madman Across the Water, Leon Russell, and Blue. In fact, there are shades of all those records here. It opens with the piano drama of "Right On Time," a gorgeous, sweeping ballad that's a showcase for her powerhouse voice (much like 2018's "The Joke"). The excellent "Letter to My Past" sounds like a love letter to Elton John circa 1971, while "You and Me on the Rock" is practically a tribute to Joni Mitchell's sunny early '70s jangle folk—and both are absolutely perfect. "Rock" also shows off Carlile's Bernie Taupin-level poetry: "I built paper planes when I learned to fly/ Like a 747 falling out of the sky/ I folded them crooked and now I'm wondering why/ I could always end up in the water." Carlile, who created the album with longtime bandmates Phil and Tim Hanseroth, worked while holed up at her Washington State "compound" during COVID lockdowns and as she was penning her stirring memoir. She has said all the "uncertainty" led her to more "dramatic" places of her brain. You hear it in the stark, spine-shivering "Mama Werewolf": "Your mama is a werewolf with long sharp teeth/ I'm up all night when the world should sleep ... If my good intentions go running wild/ If I cause you pain, my own sweet child/ Won't you promise me you'll be the one/ My silver bullet in the gun." It all feels intensely personal and you might sigh with relief when she later gives her daughters the buttery lullaby "Stay Gentle." Stripped-down "This Time Tomorrow" could've been a Highwomen outtake, "Broken Horses" is rollicking Southern rock, and "Sinners, Saints and Fools" uses strings and punchy percussion like bright spotlights on Carlile's darkest corners, before going out with a wild, arena-rock flash. The album ends in the same dramatic fashion it started, with "Throwing Good After Bad"—a heartbreaker of a piano ballad that nods at all those aforementioned '70s album influences. "Are you fantasizing?/ You're taken us for granted/ I know you're bored/ You always say I'm heavy-handed," she sings and pulls at heartstrings. It's at once so personal you might blush and so universal you might cry. Stunning. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 3, 2007 | Columbia

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 1, 2012 | Columbia

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2011 | Columbia

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Pop - Released January 1, 2021 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 13, 2006 | Red Ink - Columbia

The sticker affixed to the initial pressings of Brandi Carlile's eponymous 2005 major-label debut trumpet that the singer/songwriter is an "artist to watch" by Rolling Stone, Interview, and Paste. Those accolades, combined with cover artwork that captures her at her cutest -- as if she were a cousin of Rachael Leigh Cook -- might make some listeners suspicious of Carlile, since the cumulative effect makes her seem like a pretty, prepackaged creation. One listen to her absolutely terrific debut immediately dispels these notions. From the moment "Follow" seeps out of the speakers, it's clear that Carlile isn't a prefabricated pop star. For starters, she's a powerful, captivating vocalist, clearly influenced by Jeff Buckley, but lacking the mannered theatrical histrionics that could occasionally creep into his work. She's quieter and intimate, slowly pulling listeners into her tales of love and loss. While her words and topics may not be bracing, her music is: it's rich, warm, and seductive, familiar in its form and sound, yet sounding fresh, even original, particularly in how her folky singer/songwriter foundation blends with her art-pop inclinations. Her music ebbs and flows with long, languid melodies, strummed acoustic guitars, and her surging vocals, creating an album that's ideal for introspective, late-night listening. Carlile is supported by guitarist Tim Hanseroth and his bassist twin brother Phil (they're billed as "The Twins" in the production credits for the album), and they're not mere support, they're collaborators, co-writing several songs (Tim writes "What Can I Say" on his own), and giving the album the graceful, liquid musicality that makes it such a rewarding, addictive listen. The best thing about Brandi Carlile is that it not only doesn't sound like a debut, it sounds like a record that exists out of time and place -- which means it's not only a superb debut, it's a hell of a record by any measure. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released October 2, 2009 | Columbia

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Pop - Released July 21, 2021 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Country - Released February 16, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

Brandi Carlile does not lay idle. Between her new life as a homosexual mother which she openly displays or her activism with the association War Child, she has found time to return to the studio for the sixth time. As a mother, the hallucination of an America at the edge of cracking infused the story of what she considers the most intense of her career. By The Way, I Forgive You, entwined by the evangelical theme of forgiveness, co-produced by Shooter Jennings (the son of the late Waylon) and Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Chris Stapleton and Lori McKenna) succeeds the country folk of The Firewatcher's Daughter (2015). Ten tracks totalling 43 minutes, touching on topics such as Carlile's family, politics, identity and the faithful twin Hanseroth (Fightings Machinists). The strings were arranged by the late Paul Buckmaster (Elton John, David Bowie, Rolling Stone or Leonard Cohen) and its all packed into an emotional style of country made for a broad audience. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Pop - Released March 3, 2015 | ATO (UK)

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Seizing the occasion of a label switch to shake up her approach to recording, Brandi Carlile cut The Firewatcher's Daughter quickly, bashing out its 12 songs in a series of single takes with longtime collaborators Tim and Phil Hanseroth. The Twins, as the Hanseroth brothers are known, have been by Carlile's side since her 2005 eponymous debut, so this album doesn't amount to a shift in aesthetic as much as it is a consolidation -- a consolidation that just so happens to leave a few frayed edges dangling. It's a nifty trick, emphasizing mess, especially in the wake of records where all the loose ends were appealingly tied. That's not the case on The Firewatcher's Daughter. Whether the band is engaged in a breakneck sprint, as on the throttling "Mainstream Kid," or harmonizing with delicacy on "The Eye" and "Wilder (We're Chained)," the music twitches with energy and this vibrancy enhances a set of songs casually touching upon every style Carlile's played in the past. As always, she's grounded in Americana, often straying into a burnished folky melancholy but finding space for urgent country stomps and such full-throttle rock & roll as "Blood Muscle Skin & Bone," whose hook places it in a netherworld between arena rock and power pop. None of the stylistic shifts amount to showboating: it feels as if Carlile is following her fascinations wherever they lead. She takes a few detours, including indulging in a bit of big-footed stomp on "The Things I Regret" and the fingerpicked electric guitars of "Heroes and Songs," every one of which keeps The Firewatcher's Daughter from being as cohesive as 2012's Bear Creek, but that laissez-faire sprawl is often more appealing than its predecessor's tidiness: this is music that's lived in and deeply felt, so it resonates long after the album finishes. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 7, 2021 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Pop - Released March 14, 2021 | Oh Boy Records

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Rock - Released January 10, 2006 | Red Ink - Columbia

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Pop - Released October 17, 2018 | Low Country Sound - Elektra

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Rock - Released January 12, 2009 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop/Rock - Released September 16, 2008 | Columbia

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 9, 2010 | Columbia

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 29, 2005 | Red Ink - Columbia