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Rock - Released March 21, 1983 | Pink Floyd Records

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Four years separate this album from its predecessor The Wall which placed Pink Floyd at the height of its success. A well named Final Cut (a requiem for the post war dream), which will be the last disc with Roger Waters, solitary author of this concept-album which he interprets in its almost entirety — and the only one where keyboardist Richard Wright does not appear. Like a first solo opus? No doubt... His grandiloquence, put at the service of a frenzied anti-militarism (England and Argentina then clashed in the Falklands), is reminiscent of The Wall of which he reworked certain compositions that were discarded at the time. The result is an essay, lyrical at will.
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Rock - Released November 20, 2015 | Columbia - Legacy

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That album recording of the sold-out tour The Wall Live 2010-2013. This series of concerts by Roger Waters is the first comprehensive interpretation of the concept album by Pink Floyd since 1990. Mixing explosive scenic rock performances with strong message of peace and compassion, The Wall Live attracted more than 4.5 million spectators in more than 200 concerts across four continents! Produced by Nigel Godrich (Radiohead, Beck, Paul McCartney), the disc offers a rather exhilarating listening experience of the masterpiece originally published back in 1979, which was the first narrative concept album of Floyd. Three decades later, this scenic reinterpretation demonstrates the sheer timelessness of these particular songs. Above all, the versions offered here shed new light that all Pink Floyd fans worthy of the name will treasure. © CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released June 2, 2017 | Columbia

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Since 1979, Roger Waters has been up against The Wall. Almost 40 years after the release of The Wall, the former Pink Floyd bassist has never fundamentally surpassed his great work, the double album that entered into rock legend but which also marked a turning point in the life of the group that he founded in 1965 with Syd Barrett, Nick Mason and Richard Wright. In his several solo albums, as well as in the great live performances that re-interpret The Wall, Waters has always worked on the same grandiloquent musical and ideological themes. With Is This The Life We Really Want?, his obsessions with the alienation of the individual by society and imminent apocalypse have not changed one iota. Madness like the excesses of our times naturally form a central part of this record, his first proper studio album since Amused To Death, which came out in 1992. Roger Waters, who surely knew that he needed to introduce a little novelty into his creative universe, had the good idea of entrusting the production to Nigel Godrich, who is mainly known for his work with Radiohead. And to amplify the winds of change, the British producer even roused some of the big names of his generation, like the guitarist Jonathan Wilson, the drummer Joey Waronker and keyboard player Roger Manning. But the Waters fundamentals are still very much audible. And his fans, as well as Floyd fans, will soon feel a sense of homecoming. Roger Waters has not revolutionised his art, his words, and even less his personal touch. Instead, he has set about developing the talent for which he is known. And in his register of rock that verges on the theatrical, he truly excels. © CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released August 21, 1984 | Columbia

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When dissected carefully, The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking becomes a fascinating conceptual voyage into the workings of the human psyche. As an abstract peering into the intricate functions of the subconscious, Waters' first solo album involves numerous dream sequences that both figuratively and symbolically unravel his struggle with marriage, fidelity, commitment, and age at the height of a midlife crisis. While the songs (titled by the times in which Waters experiences each dream) seem to lack in musical fluidity at certain points, they make up for it with ingenious symbolism and his brilliant use of stream of consciousness within a subconscious realm. Outside from the deep but sometimes patchy narrative framework, the music slightly lacks in rhythm or hooks, except for the title track that includes some attractive guitar playing via Eric Clapton. David Sanborn's saxophone is another attribute, adding some life to "Go Fishing" and "The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking." But it's truly the imagery and the visual design of the album that is front and center, since the importance lies in what Waters is trying to get across to the audience, decorated somewhat casually by his singing and the music. With Pink Floyd, the marriage of Waters' concepts and ideas with the talented musicianship of the rest of the band presented a complete masterpiece in both thought and music, while his solo efforts lean more toward the conceptual aspects of his work. With this in mind, The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking continues to showcase Waters' unprecedented knack of addressing his darkest thoughts and conceptions in a most extraordinary fashion. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 9, 2020 | WaterTower Music

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Rock - Released June 16, 1987 | Columbia

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Roger Waters' second solo album is yet another conceptual narrative, one that tells the tale of a wheelchair-bound boy who tries to halt the threat of nuclear war through his use of the HAM radio. The story line isn't held together as tightly as his first album, and the whole fable seems a little too far fetched, even when taken lightly. Unlike The Pros and Cons album, the music here overrides the narrative, but not by much, highlighted by the upbeat pop single "Radio Waves." The last tune, entitled "The Tide Is Turning," is the only other focal point of the album, an honest-sounding ballad that relinquishes a glimmer of hope in an otherwise unpromising world. Waters' anti-war theme is stretched full across the album, but the music itself struggles to capture any attention, bogged down by half-whispers and flat-lined melodies that are only slightly resuscitated from time to time with some trumpet and saxophone. The novelty of Los Angeles disc jockey Jim Ladd wears off quickly, as he was obviously used to add some lightheartedness to the album's pessimistic undertones. Waters' use of imagery and thematic depth are absent from Radio K.A.O.S., leaving his superficial spiel with barely any sustenance, which in turn hinders the moral of the album so that it fails to reach its fruition. While both The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking and Amused to Death convey his talented use of concept, imagination, and lyrical mastery, this album seems to be nothing more than a fictional tale with a blatantly apparent message. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 7, 2004 | Columbia

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Rock - Released November 7, 2011 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Classical - Released October 4, 2005 | Sony Classical

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Roger Waters, the man who equated "education" with "thought control" in his pseudo-opera The Wall, is now back and appealing to higher culture in his new opera Ça Ira. Moreover, this is a real opera, with singers, a chorus, and an orchestra with not a single dreamy, overlong electric guitar solo in sight. Fans of Pink Floyd will find little in Ça Ira to satisfy their jones for "the Floyd," although there are many standard musical features associated with the classic rock staple group that have been carried over into this work -- crushingly slow tempi, somber and monotonous singing, and a mania for pristine recordings of sound effects. At one point, a volley of musket fire makes you jump out of your seat. Ça Ira was undertaken with librettists Etienne and Nadine Roda-Gil not long after The Wall, but it took Waters so long to put the finishing touches on it that his collaborators have since died. Waters made a smart decision in using librettists for this project, as his own corroded worldview would certainly have undone the basic idea, the message of which is "there is hope." That said, the Roda-Gils took on too large of a swath of the French Revolution to cram into three acts, and the listener gets no more than a picture postcard sense of its flavor. All of the principal singers in this recording are required to take on multiple roles in Ça Ira, and this results in a twofold effect. The first is that it brings Ça Ira into the realm of opera-oratorio, and even to some degree Brechtian "Lehrstück," and secondly, it's hard to tell what character a singer is supposed to be portraying if one is not following the libretto. Expect the motion picture version soon! Naturally, Bryn Terfel and Ying Huang are top-drawer opera singers, and Terfel relishes the opportunity, chewing on as much scenery as he can get his hands on. Huang, for her part, hangs in there, but she does not sing as though she loves this material. Ça Ira would be a hard opera for a singer to love, as there is no characterization through the singing whatsoever, and characters themselves are not given enough of the floor to engage us. The orchestration is handled with taste and some sophistication, but in terms of melody, Ça Ira is the sing-songiest opera since the pre-revolutionary days of Thomas and Sally. Wherever the fundamental of the harmonic movement is, the melody line follows, and vice-versa. In spots where there is no harmonic foundation, Waters resorts to scalar or bugle-call like figures that, while effectively passing as notes to hang the words onto, do not constitute melody in and of themselves. This kind of texture overall would be tremendously monochromatic and dull for the average opera listener. However, if the name above the title were Andrew Lloyd Webber, then Ça Ira would be considered better than average. Moreover, there is potential good to be reaped if Ça Ira gains some popularity. If it proves to your standard-issue stoner that you don't have to be a dork to enjoy an opera, that's terrific. If it helps raise the public profile of the fine singers involved here, that is great, too. Nevertheless, as an opera of which the notion "there is hope" is the main theme, at least musically Ça Ira isn't very hopeful. © TiVo
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Dance - Released January 1, 2007 | Pryda Presents

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Rock - Released May 29, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

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Rock - Released June 19, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

Country - Released July 31, 2020 | Kitchen Dwellers

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Rock - Released July 12, 2019 | GOBO

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Country - Released June 26, 2020 | Kitchen Dwellers

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House - Released April 27, 2016 | Rhythm Lab

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Classical - Released October 4, 2005 | Sony Classical

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Roger Waters, the man who equated "education" with "thought control" in his pseudo-opera The Wall, is now back and appealing to higher culture in his new opera Ça Ira. Moreover, this is a real opera, with singers, a chorus, and an orchestra with not a single dreamy, overlong electric guitar solo in sight. Fans of Pink Floyd will find little in Ça Ira to satisfy their jones for "the Floyd," although there are many standard musical features associated with the classic rock staple group that have been carried over into this work -- crushingly slow tempi, somber and monotonous singing, and a mania for pristine recordings of sound effects. At one point, a volley of musket fire makes you jump out of your seat. Ça Ira was undertaken with librettists Etienne and Nadine Roda-Gil not long after The Wall, but it took Waters so long to put the finishing touches on it that his collaborators have since died. Waters made a smart decision in using librettists for this project, as his own corroded worldview would certainly have undone the basic idea, the message of which is "there is hope." That said, the Roda-Gils took on too large of a swath of the French Revolution to cram into three acts, and the listener gets no more than a picture postcard sense of its flavor. All of the principal singers in this recording are required to take on multiple roles in Ça Ira, and this results in a twofold effect. The first is that it brings Ça Ira into the realm of opera-oratorio, and even to some degree Brechtian "Lehrstück," and secondly, it's hard to tell what character a singer is supposed to be portraying if one is not following the libretto. Expect the motion picture version soon! Naturally, Bryn Terfel and Ying Huang are top-drawer opera singers, and Terfel relishes the opportunity, chewing on as much scenery as he can get his hands on. Huang, for her part, hangs in there, but she does not sing as though she loves this material. Ça Ira would be a hard opera for a singer to love, as there is no characterization through the singing whatsoever, and characters themselves are not given enough of the floor to engage us. The orchestration is handled with taste and some sophistication, but in terms of melody, Ça Ira is the sing-songiest opera since the pre-revolutionary days of Thomas and Sally. Wherever the fundamental of the harmonic movement is, the melody line follows, and vice-versa. In spots where there is no harmonic foundation, Waters resorts to scalar or bugle-call like figures that, while effectively passing as notes to hang the words onto, do not constitute melody in and of themselves. This kind of texture overall would be tremendously monochromatic and dull for the average opera listener. However, if the name above the title were Andrew Lloyd Webber, then Ça Ira would be considered better than average. Moreover, there is potential good to be reaped if Ça Ira gains some popularity. If it proves to your standard-issue stoner that you don't have to be a dork to enjoy an opera, that's terrific. If it helps raise the public profile of the fine singers involved here, that is great, too. Nevertheless, as an opera of which the notion "there is hope" is the main theme, at least musically Ça Ira isn't very hopeful. © TiVo
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Rock - Released August 31, 2016 | Pink Floyd Records

Rock - Released April 9, 2021 | Rhino - Parlophone

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House - Released November 18, 2011 | JTV Recordings

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Composer

Roger Waters in the magazine
  • The tale retold
    The tale retold Ever since he was a boy, Pink Floyd's bassist Roger Waters has been haunted by his father's death in the Second World